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You are viewing a feed that contains frequently updated content from the Surface Freshwater GEF IW Portfolio, IUCN Water and other partner organisations working in Integrated River Basin Management.
Feed Item5th IWRM Regional Steering Committee Meeting
Celebrating the Successes of the GEF Pacific IWRM Project and Planning the Regional 'Ridge to Reef' Initiative 8th October 2013: The Fifth Regional Steering Committee Meeting for the GEF supported Pacific IWRM Programme will be convened in Nadi, Fiji Islands from 11-15 Novermber 2013. The meeting will be participated in by GEF Operational Focal Points, National IWRM Focal Points and Demonstration Project Managers, as well as representatives of the GEF Implementing Agencies, IUCN, diplomatic missions, and the Pacific regional CROP agencies. Important items of business for consideration by the Committee include: stocktaking of the projects process, stress reduction, environmental and water resource results; the status of the project’s suite of national IWRM demonstration projects; recent water and sanitation policy and IWRM planning achievements; development of a regional GEF supported 'Ridge to Reef' initiative; and the planning of the project's terminal evaluation. More information and background documents for the meeting can be accessed online here – Regional Steering Committee webpage . Meeting documentation can be accessed via Pacific-IWRM.org - please click here . Marc Wilson, Regional Project Manager
Feed ItemFilm: Integration for Sustainable Development
Pacific IWRW: New Film Highlights Achievements of Efforts to Develop Integrated Management for the Sustainable Development of Pacific SIDS Launched in 2009, the Global Environment Facility supported project entitled 'Implementing Sustainable Water Resources and Wastewater Management in Pacific Islands Countries' (or the GEF Pacific IWRM Project) has worked with 14 Pacific Island Small Island Developing States to pilot innovative IWRM solutions to the regions most pressing water and sanitation issues. This short film entitled 'Integration for Sustainable Development' highlights the results of the GEF Pacific IWRM Project in reducing stress on vulnerable freshwater and coastal lagoon resources, strengthening national coordination for IWRM, and in reforming national policy for water and sanitation management. No Frames
Feed ItemIWRM Achievement Stories
Recognising the accomplishments of communities, governments and IWRM teams through national IWRM Achievement Stories 7 th  March 2014: The IWRM project has been working hard over the past five years to ensure that real progress is made towards sustainable management of water and wastewater across the participating Pacific countries. To achieve this there has been a dedicated collective of project managers and assistants, local and national government members and most importantly of all local communities at demonstration sites, learning from each other and working together to make it all happen. These stories, written by national project managers and community members highlight some key achievements from each country. From innovative community engagement techniques and enhancing community capacities to introducing new waste-reduction technologies and developing water-related polices; these stories show how the projects are positively impacting on the communities and generating a deeper understanding of IWRM across the Pacific. Visit the Kava Bowl to access the Country Achievement Stories - click here .
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-035 «Shoreline and ice cleanup campaigns for Lake Baikal and Selenga River», application period: 20 March 2013 - 08 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-037 «Recommendations on environmental investments on active concerns to reduce pollution discharge in the Russian Federation», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-038 «Intercalibration of analytical procedures for analytes, included into harmonized program of hydrochemical monitoring for Selenga river basin (Mongolia)», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-041 «Development of optimal technological solutions for safe storage, retreatment, neutralization and utilization of toxic substances, contained in waste products of inoperative...», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Development of optimal technological solutions for safe storage, retreatment, neutralization and utilization of toxic substances, contained in waste products of inoperative mining enterprise “Dzhidinsky”
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-042 «Development of technological solutions for minimization of anthropogenic impact of adit mine waters of Kholodninsky poly-metal deposit on water ecosystems», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-044 «Biodiversity compatible tourism plan for the site of goddess Yangima representation of face on stone near Bargusinski Buddhist Temple, village Yaricto, Buriatiya, Russia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 15 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-053 «Friends of Baikal Basin” conception designing and implementation, Mongolia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-039 «Intercalibration of analytical procedures for analytes, included into harmonized program of hydrochemical monitoring for Selenga river basin (The Russian Federation)», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-040 «Setting up the model of pollutants transport and water balance in the Baikal Basin», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-045 «Complex eco-travel tour for the Baikal State Nature Biosphere Reserve», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-046 «Pilot sport fishing program», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-047 «The Ecological Atlas of the Baikal Basin development, Mongolia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-048 «The Ecological Atlas of the Baikal Basin development, Russia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-043 «Development of computer analysis of space images of Barguzinsky and Kurumkansky districts..." application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Tender RFQ_EMO_2013-043 «Development of computer analysis of space images of Barguzinsky and Kurumkansky districts of the Republic of Buryatia for identification of abandoned cattle mortuaries in Barguzinsky and Kurumkansy districts, and carrying out of microbiological analysis of soil in order to reveal the anthrax strains», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-049 «Baikal Information Center (BIC) maintenance, Mongolia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-050 «Baikal Information Center (BIC) maintenance, Russia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-054 «NGO Network “Friends of Baikal Basin” conception designing and implementation, Russia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-036 «Monitoring of water quality on Selenga Delta», application period: 16 April 2013 - 04 May 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-055 «Training for rising awareness and improvement in management of stakeholders in Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS) and Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs)», application period: 16 April 2013 - 04 May 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-056 «Documentary movie production», application period: 16 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-057 «Development of technological solutions for minimization of anthropogenic impact of ore gold mining and processing enterprises on environment », application period: 16 April 2013 - 04 May2013
"Development of technological solutions for minimization of anthropogenic impact of ore gold mining and processing enterprises on environment"
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-058 “Pilot construction of cattle mortuary in Kurumkansky district, Buryatia, The Russian Federation”, application period: 13 May 2013 - 25 May 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-059 «Clean up the riparian zone of Lake Hovsgol and expansion of water sanitation zone in the degraded shorelines», application period: 23 May 2013 - 12 June 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013_060 «The joint project with OECD for Selenga subbasin - Evaluation of effectiveness in IWRM», application period: 24 May 2013 - 12 June 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-061 (Round table and training for stakeholders), application period: 07 June 2013 - 26 June 2013
“Holding of round table “development of ecological tourism: initiatives and partnership of business, society and state” within the scope of international Forum “EcoTourism on Baikal +20” on July 13, 2013 in Turka (tourist zone “Baikalskaya gavanj”), Buryatia, Russia” and “Training for stakeholders’’ awareness rising and management improvement in the field of environmental problems of Lake Baikal Basin and the role of green economy in their solving".
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-062 "Biodiversity compatible tourism plan with a route to the seasonal haul for the Baikal seal on the island Tonkii. (Ushkanyi Islands), Buryatia, Russia", application period: 05 July 2013 - 25 July 2013
Feed ItemRFQ_GPSO_2013-063 "Model sub-basin Essential Fish Habitat in Russia", application period: 12 July 2013 - 01 August 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-064 “Pilot construction of cattle mortuary in Barguzinsky district, Buryatia, The Russian Federation”; application period: 16 August 2013 - 26 August 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-065 (IWC-78317) “Extension of eco-trail “Cedar Alley” and enhancement of biodiversity compatible comprehensive botanical tour for it in the Baikal State Nature Biosphere Reserve, Tankhoi, Buryatiya, Russia"
Feed Item7th GEF Biennial International Waters Conference
Feed Item3rd meeting of The Joint Russian-Mongolian comission of environment preservation.
On 28 October, 2013 the Russian delegation headed by the Chairman of the Commission, Deputy Head of the Rosprirodnadzor, Amirhan Amirhanov, Mongolian - Chairman of the Committee, the Vice Minister of the Environment and Green Development of Mongolia Tulga Buyaa.
Feed ItemSub-regional workshop: “Strengthening Regional Cooperation in Water Management in North and Central Asia”
Feed ItemIV All-Russian congress of environmental protection of Natural Resources Ministry of Russia.
Feed ItemLake Baikal Project - the partner of tourism year.
There are participation in EUROPARK conference, “Baikal without boundaries” documentary preparation, development of touristic plans compatible with biodiversity were developed.
Feed ItemIntercalibration of analytical procedures for analytes, included into harmonized program of hydrochemical monitoring for Selenga river basin
Hydrochemical Institute, Rostov-on-Don, Russia Central Chemical Laboratory of Institute of Meteorology, Hydrology and Environment (Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia)
Feed ItemDevelopment of optimal technological solutions for safe storage, retreatment, neutralization and utilization of toxic substances, contained in waste products of inoperative mining enterprise “Dzhidinsky”.
Geological Institute SB RAS, Ulan-Ude, Russia
Feed ItemDevelopment of technological solutions for minimization of anthropogenic impact of adit mine waters of Kholodninsky poly-metal deposit on water ecosystems.
Buryat State University, Ulan-Ude, Russia
Feed ItemExtension of eco-trail “Cedar Alley” and enhancement of biodiversity compatible comprehensive botanical tour for it in the Baikal State Nature Biosphere Reserve, Tankhoi, Buriatiya, Russia
FSBI “Baikal State Nature Biosphere Reserve”
Feed ItemDevelopment of technological solutions for minimization of anthropogenic impact of ore gold mining and processing enterprises on environment (Holbinsky)
Baikal Institute of Nature Management SB RAS, Ulan-Ude, Russia
Feed ItemComplex eco-travel tour for the Baikal State Nature Biosphere Reserve
NGO "Baikal Eco-Touristic Association"
Feed Item2013 Summary
Brief summary of the project achievements in 2013 year
Feed ItemTransboundary Diagnostic Analysis of the Lake Baikal Basin
ANO “Center of international projects” (Moscow), Institute of GeoEcology (Ulaanbaatar), Saskia Marijnissen
Feed ItemGroundwater resource assessment as a contribution to the TDA, including surface water - groundwater interactions and groundwater dependent ecosystem in the Baikal Basin
UNESCO Division of Water Sciences - International Hydrological Programme (IHP)
Feed ItemMonitoring of water quality of the Selenga Delta
Baikal Institute of Nature Management SB RAS, Ulan-Ude, Russia
Feed ItemReview and rank upgrade needs for Mongolian municipalities in the Selenge River basin, including the identification of ongoing and planned water and sanitation projects, focusing on Kharaa River Basin pollution assessment
UNESCO Division of Water Sciences - International Hydrological Programme (IHP)
Feed ItemBiodiversity conservation standards and biodiversity management objectives for tourism and mining
Gunin Petr and Bazha Sergey, Moscow, Russia
Feed ItemDevelopment of a Sub-basin Essential Fish Habitat Model
FSUE “State research and development center of fishery”, Baikal branch
Feed ItemThe joint project with OECD for Selenga Sub-basin - Evaluation of effectiveness in IWRM
Group of consultants
Feed ItemTugnuy-Sukhara sub-basin watershed management plan (Buryatia, Russia)
Taisiya Bardakhanova, Russia
Feed ItemKhilok sub-basin watershed management plan (Zabaikalsky Krai, Russia)
Kochneva Natalia, Russia
Feed ItemIder sub-basin watershed management plan (Mongolia)
Mongolia Water Forum-ushelts
Feed ItemEg sub-basin watershed management plan (Mongolia)
Mongolia Water Forum-ushelts
Feed ItemOrkhon/Selenga sub-basin watershed management plan (Mongolia)
Mongolia Water Forum-ushelts
Feed ItemInstitutional Strengthening for IWRM
In 2013 the Project supported existing institutional transboundary structures...
Feed ItemTraining assessment (Mongolia)
SOLONGO Tsevegmid, Mongolia
Feed ItemTraining assessment (Russia)
Danilova Z.A., Russia
Feed ItemThe training workshop for stakeholders ’’Awareness rising and management improvement in the field of environmental problems of Lake Baikal Basin and the role of green economy in their solving’’
Baikal Institute of Nature Management SB RAS, Ulan-Ude, Russia
Feed ItemPOPs study guide and trainings
Center of International Projects and Bayarjargal Munkhuu, Russia, Mongolia
Feed ItemA training for raising awareness and improvement in management of stakeholders in Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS) and Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in Mongolia
Bayarjargal Munkhuu,
Feed ItemSetting up the model of pollutants transport and water balance in the Baikal Basin
Faculty of Geography of Moscow State University, Russia
Feed ItemBiodiversity compatible recreational tourism plan for Zabaikalsky National Park
Irkutsk State Technical University, Irkutsk, Russia
Feed ItemCreation of a biodiversity compatible tourism plan with a route to the seasonal haul for the Baikal seal on the island Tonkii (Ushkanyi Islands), Zabaikalski National Park, Buriatiya, Russia
FSBI “Zapovednoe Podlemorye”
Feed ItemEUROPARC integration support
Feed ItemAward for the Mongolian University Students
Feed ItemAward for the Outstanding Professional in the Tourism Industry
Feed ItemBaikal Information Center (BIC)
Baikal Institute of Nature Management, Russia Orkhon River Basin Council, NGO, Mongolia
Feed ItemEcological Atlas of the Baikal Basin
Institute of Geography SB RAS, Irkutsk, Russia Institute of Geography, MAS, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Feed Item2013 Shoreline clean-up campaigns in Russia
The project "Save Baikal"
Feed Item2013 Shoreline clean-up campaigns in Mongolia
Sayan Zone NGO
Feed ItemThe documentary “BAIKAL WITHOUT BOUNDARIES”
The Project Atlas of Culture
Feed ItemDay of Russian Science in Ulan-Ude: HD Documentary "Baikal without boundaries" presentation
Feed ItemVA/2014/B5002/4759
SAP SAG member - Legal and Economic Expert-Mongolia Application period 13-Feb-2014 to 20-Feb-2014
Feed ItemVA/2014/B5002/4756
SAP SAG member - Social and Political Expert-Mongolia Application period 13-Feb-2014 to 20-Feb-2014
Feed ItemVA/2014/B5002/4742
SAP SAG member - Natural Scientists and Biodiversity Expert-Mongolia Application period 13-Feb-2014 to 20-Feb-2014
Feed ItemVA/2014/B5002/4758
SAP SAG member - Legal and Economic Expert-Russia Application period 13-Feb-2014 to 20-Feb-2014
Feed ItemVA/2014/B5002/4757
SAP SAG member - Social and Political Expert-Russia Application period 13-Feb-2014 to 20-Feb-2014
Feed ItemVA/2014/B5002/4755
SAP SAG member - Natural Scientists and Biodiversity Expert-Russia Application period 13-Feb-2014 to 20-Feb-2014
Feed ItemVA/2014/B5002/4760
SAP Development Expert Application period 13-Feb-2014 to 20-Feb-2014
Feed ItemIon chromatograph DIONEX was installed in Central Laboratory of Environment and Metrology
Feed ItemIn Full HD (English): Documentary "Baikal without boundaries"
The geographical scope of the movie is the whole Baikal Lake basin that extends to two countries, Russia and Mongolia, and encompasses waste territories with rivers bringing waters to the lake. The Baikal Lake Basin is home to several architectural and natural landmarks, as well as rare scientific artifacts. The main message of the documentary is to make the global community aware of the problems that the Baikal Lake Basin is facing and the need to preserve it as a unique natural, ecological and social and cultural phenomenon (Full HD, 39 min).
Feed ItemDocumentary "Baikal without boundaries" presentation
The Documentary "Baikal without boundaries" was presented to the project stakeholders in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Feed ItemBaikal Informational Center Workshop
Feed ItemUNEP/IW:LEARN ICT Workshop on Spatial Data Management
Feed ItemRound table in Russian State Library: “World Water Day 2014: Water and energetics”
Feed ItemWorld Water Day in Russia
Feed ItemStrategic Action Programme Meeting
Feed ItemApplication form
Use this form to prepare your application
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014_066 (IWC-78317) “Shoreline and ice cleanup campaigns for Lake Baikal and Selenga River”, application period: 05 Apr 2014 - 25 Apr 2014
Feed ItemThe first tender of 2014
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014-068 (IWC-78317) «Intercalibration of analytical procedures for analytes, included into harmonized program of hydrochemical monitoring for Selenga river basin. Phase II. (The Russian Federation)». Application period: 10 Apr - 29 Apr
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014-069 (IWC-78317) “Intercalibration of analytical procedures for analyses, included into harmonized program of hydrochemical monitoring for Selenga river basin. Phase II. (Mongolia)”. Application period: 10 Apr - 29 Apr 2014
Feed ItemRFQ_GPSO_2014_070 (IWC-78317) “Training workshop “Environmental education on lakeside areas: best practices and innovations”. Application period: 10 Apr - 29 Apr 2014
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014-072 (IWC-78317) “Development of a brand, media conception and presentation of "Pearl necklace of Baikal" (Baikal protected areas association) in Russian and English”; Application period: 10 Apr - 20 Apr 2014
Feed ItemRFQ_GPSO_2014-071 (IWC-78317) “Development of computer analysis of space images of Barguzinsky and Kurumkansky districts of the Republic of Buryatia for identification of abandoned cattle mortuaries in ... Application period: 10 Apr - 29 Apr 2014
“Development of computer analysis of space images of Barguzinsky and Kurumkansky districts of the Republic of Buryatia for identification of abandoned cattle mortuaries in Barguzinsky and Kurumkansy districts, and carrying out of microbiological analysis of soil in order to reveal the anthrax strains”
Feed ItemRFQ_GPSO_2014-073 (IWC-78317) “Development and publish a special release of journal devoted to sustainable ecotourism development in "Pearl necklace of Baikal" (Baikal protected areas association) ... Application period: 10 Apr - 29 Apr 2014
RFQ_GPSO_2014-073 (IWC-78317) “Development and publish a special release of journal devoted to sustainable ecotourism development in "Pearl necklace of Baikal" (Baikal protected areas association) in Russian and English”
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014-074 (IWC-78317) “Short-term training program for preparation guides for organizing ornithological tours in the Baikal region”; Application period: 10 Apr - 29 Apr 2014
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014_075 (IWC-78317) «The Ecological Atlas of the Baikal Basin publishing - Russia». Application period: 10 Apr - 29 Apr 2014
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014_076 (IWC-78317) «The Ecological Atlas of the Baikal Basin publishing - Mongolia» . Application period: 10 Apr - 29 Apr 2014
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014-077 (IWC-78317) The demonstration best practices in siting a new mine in order to avoid soil and groundwater contamination and impacts on surface water systems.” . Application period: 10 Apr - 29 Apr 2014
Feed Item“Baikal without boundaries” HD on TV channels
Feed ItemLake Baikal ice cleaning campaign
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014_066 (IWC-78317) “Shoreline and ice cleanup campaigns for Lake Baikal and Selenga River”, application period: 05 Apr 2014 - 25 Apr 2014
Feed ItemDrawing and essay writing competition
Feed ItemBrief introduction of “Ugii” lake and cleaning campaign round the lake
Feed ItemTenders deadline extension
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014-078 (IWC-78317) “Organization of the Project Steering Committee Meeting and Strategic Action Programme Team participants meeting; Holding of The International conference...", application period: 30 Apr 2014 - 20 May 2014
Tender RFQ_GPSO_2014-078 (IWC-78317) “Organization of the Project Steering Committee Meeting and Strategic Action Programme Team participants meeting; Holding of The International research-to-practice environmental conference with the participation of nature conservation community of Baikal region and Mongolia” (jointly with Rosprirodnadzor)”. Application period: 30 Apr 2014 - 20 May 2014
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014-078 : the deadline extension / Тендер RFQ_GPSO_2014-078 : продление срока приема заявок
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2014_079 (IWC-78317) "International fieldwork for establishment of sanitary and epidemiological monitoring of transboundary water bodies on the territories of the Republic of Buryatia and Mongolia", application period 27 May - 05 June 2014
Feed ItemTender RFQ No: RFQ_GPSO_2014_080 (IWC-78317) Biodiversity compatible tourist and recreational plan for Sorozhya bay, Zabaikalsky National Park, Buryatia, Russia; application period - 29 May - 09 June 2014
Feed ItemTender RFQ No: RFQ_GPSO_2014_081 (IWC-78317) "Organizing and conducting of training workshops for environmental inspectors of the Baikal Natural Territory"; application period - 29 May - 09 June 2014
Feed ItemConsultative Forum on the Strategic Action Programme at Bujumbura
Feed ItemLVEMP II rewards the best Community Driven Development Project in Watershed Management
The Lake Victoria Environmental Management Project joined the rest of the world to celebrate the World Environment Day (WED) on 5th June, 2014, in Furahia grounds - Mwanza, Tanzania. LVEMP II customized this year’s theme as Conserve our Environment to address Climate Change, in line with the Projects Global Development Objectives.
Feed ItemNational BWM Seminar Nicaragua
The first Meeting of the National Task Force for the Ballast Water Management Convention in Nicaragua was held on 23 May 2014 in Managua.
Feed ItemSampling Ballast Water in Aqaba
The GloBallast Project and PERSGA organised a three-day national training on sampling of ballast water in Aqaba, Jordan from 5 to 7 May 2014. The objective of the training was to further raise awareness about invasive alien species and the Ballast Water Management Convention and more importantly to prepare the country for the sampling of ballast water for data collection prior to entry into force of the BWM Convention.
Feed ItemTokelau steps up to host Fisheries Ministerial
The Pacific’s annual meeting of Fisheries Ministers heads to the region’s smallest island community this weekend, becoming part of a historic moment for Tokelau. Traditional leaders and the close-knit community of Atafu, where ministers and officials are set to make landing this Sunday are going to be welcoming the territory’s first-ever regional gathering of Pacific ministers. Staff of the Apia-based Government office for Tokelau, led by General Manager Jovilisi Suveinakama and Tokelau-based Mikaele Perez, Director for Economic Development, Natural Resources and Environment have spent months in preparation sorting host-country logistics for the nine Fisheries Ministers and all the 17 FFA member country delegations attending. Perez says the island community of Atafu is “abuzz” with the countdown to the arrival of almost 70 FFC10 ministerial meeting delegates and observers.
Feed ItemRegional Plan of Action on Sustainable Utilization of Neritic Tuna in the ASEAN Region Drafted
SEAFDEC with support from the SEAFDEC-Sweden Project organized the Experts Group Meeting on Regional Plan of Action on Sustainable Utilization of Neritic Tuna in the ASEAN Region in Krabi Province, Thailand on 18-20 June 2014. The Meeting was attended by representatives from Cambodia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam together with their respective delegations, and ... The post Regional Plan of Action on Sustainable Utilization of Neritic Tuna in the ASEAN Region Drafted appeared first on SEAFDEC-Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center .
Feed ItemGEF Provides Guide on How to Access Resources under the Special Climate Change Fund
Programs that focus on adaptation to climate change remain to be among the significant activities being funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) to support the Coral Triangle Initiative (CTI)....
Feed ItemInternational Water Centre Masters Scholarships - Australia
The International WaterCentre (IWC) is offering several scholarships for high calibre international and domestic students accepted into the IWC Master of Integrated Water Management (MIWM) commencing in Semester 1, 2015. These prestigious scholarships will be awarded on a merit-basis to candidates who clearly demonstrate potential to become future water leaders.
Feed ItemBlue growth - unlocking the potential of seas and oceans
Today’s fisheries sector hosts a multibillion dollar industry that is a vital source of food, employment, trade, economic wellbeing and recreation.
Feed ItemSustainable Tourism Thrives in Philippines' Largest Marine Sanctuary
Green Fins Initiative protects coral reefs and drives tourism
Feed ItemXVI Consultative Committee Meeting on Large Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Partners, Paris France
(Conference: 8-11 July 2014) The opening session will provide the opportunity to take stock of 15 years of marine and coastal projects and consultative LME meetings under the global coordination of NOAA, and highlight the progress achieved in advancing ecosystem assessment and management.
Feed ItemCampaign to protect the sardines of the Sulu-Celebes Sea launched
Recent studies have shown that the sardine stock in the Sulu Celebes Sea is under threat of collapse. Overfishing is an important factor but there are many other causes. These include pollution and climate change.
Feed ItemArt and Music Highlight the Beauty and Importance of Tropical Marine Life
A painting exhibit, a book launch, and soundscapes come together to celebrate the beauty and diversity of tropical marine life in “In Tropical Seas,” in observance of Environment Month (June)....
Feed ItemTWAP Groundwater - Regional Workshop for Western and Central Africa, Dakar, Senegal 22-24 July 2014
TWAP Groundwater - Regional Workshop for Western and Central Africa, Dakar, Senegal 22-24 July 2014
Feed ItemFAO Publishes Guide on Implementing Improved Tenure Governance in Fisheries
The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Fisheries and Aquaculture Department has published a guide that explains the characteristics of the fisheries sector and provides technical guidance....
Feed ItemIUCN releases "Transboundary water governance: adaptation to climate change"
Management of transboundary waters in increasingly becoming more challenging, and climate change is likely to exacerbate these pressures. Not least because climate change is a global issue, adaptation will require an international response. This book aims to identify issues, both theoretical and practical, that States face in establishing cooperative transboundary mechanisms to effectively adapt water management to climate change.
Feed ItemCompanies disclose ecological footprint of 82 million tonnes of pulp and paper
Gland, Switzerland — WWF recognizes the leadership in transparency of 25 of the world's most important pulp and paper manufacturers, as demonstrated by their participation in the WWF Environmental Paper Company Index 2013 . Companies voluntarily disclosed the ecological footprint of 40 product categories, more than doubling those evaluated in the 2011 index. The companies recognized for their transparency in today's launch of the WWF Environmental Paper Company Index (EPCI) 2013 together produce 14 per cent of the world´s paper and board, respectively 28 per cent of the world's graphic paper, 29 per cent of the world's newsprint, 14 per cent of the world's tissue and 6 per cent of the world's packaging. They also produce 14 per cent of the world's pulp. In alphabetical order, the 25 companies showing leadership in transparency in the EPCI 2013 are: Appleton Coated (North America), ARAUCO(South America), Arjowiggins Graphic (Europe), BillerudKorsnäs (Europe), Bio-PAPPEL (Central America), Cascades (North America), CMPC (South America), Domtar (North America), Fedrigoni (Europe), Fibria (South America), ITC (Asia), Klabin (South America), Lecta (Europe), Lenzing Papier (Europe), Metsä Group (Europe), Mondi (South Africa), NewPage (North America), Norske Skog (Europe), Resolute Forest Products (North America), SCA (Europe), Södra (Europe), Sofidel (Europe), Stora Enso (Europe), TNPL/Tamil Nadu (Asia), UPM (Europe). * Regions refer to headquarter locations. "We are delighted that over a third of the 70 globally significant players invited to participate in the WWF EPCI 2013 have taken this opportunity to disclose their sustainability performance and targets," says Emmanuelle Neyroumande, Manager of WWF International's pulp and paper work. "This robust participation shows a real interest by the companies in working towards reducing their ecological footprint." WWF's Environmental Paper Company Index covers the major impacts of the paper industry on the environment for the production of newspaper grades, graphic paper, packaging, tissue, or pulp. The companies scored against 3 aspects;impacts on forest ecosystems from fibre sourcing, emissions from manufacturing processes such as water pollution and greenhouse gas emissions and reporting and Environmental Management System. The criteria apply to both policy and production, hence measuring each company's targets and actual performance. WWF's projections show that higher incomes and a growing population will increase demand for many commodities, including food, fuel, timber and fibres 1 . Forest-based industries, which rely on resources that can be renewed, will be key to conserving forests in an age of resource scarcity and land-use competition. Even though the paper industry has shown some progress in recent decades, the globalized nature of the industry demands sector–wide, ambitious environmental goals for responsible sourcing, production and use of its products and maximum transparency. The WWF Environmental Paper Company Index can assist the pulp and paper industry on its path of continual improvement. "More important than the scores achieved is the transparency shown by the participants. Companies that declined to participate have missed a chance to demonstrate the efforts they might be undertaking to address environmental issues" says Neyroumande. In addition to reporting on environmental performance, companies participating in the WWF Environmental Paper Company Index can request WWF's advice and feedback on potential areas of improvement, potential risks and tools to support company efforts toward greater sustainability. For further information: Helma Brandlmaier, Senior Advisor Paper Footprint and Market Change WWF International Tel: +43676842728219 Email Notes to editors Access the WWF EPCI 2013 results on www.panda.org/epci2013 Early 2013 WWF invited 70 of the world's most important and strategically relevant paper manufacturers, representing 25 per cent of global wood pulp production and 35 per cent of global paper and paperboard production, to participate in the third edition of its Environmental Paper Company Index (EPCI). Find a list of all 70 invited companies on www.panda.org/epci2013 . The EPCI started in its current form in 2010. Participation has increased from 5 participants in 2010, to 15 (in 19 product categories) in 2011 and now 25 participants (in 40 product categories) in 2013. The Environmental Paper Company Index will continue to be highlighted biannually. Participants in the EPCI 2011 (in alphabetical order): Arjowiggins Graphic, Burgo, Cascades, Domtar, Fedrigoni, Korsnäs, Metsä Tissue, Mondi, M-real, Renova, SCA, Sofidel, Stora Enso, Suzano, UPM Participants in the EPCI 2010 (in alphabetical order): Domtar, Mondi, M-Real, Stora Enso, UPM The EPCI method looks at environmental aspects of a company's policies and targets, as well as the environmental performance of the overall production of a specific product category (newsprint, graphic paper, household and sanitary, packaging paper and boards, pulp). It includes the environmental performance from own pulp and paper production, as well as performance of market pulp purchased. 1 WWF´s Living Forest Report chapter 4 contains WWF´s 2050 projections www.panda.org/livingforests WWF tools to assist companies in the forest sector to improve their sustainability performance. the WWF´s Global Forest and Trade Network (GFTN ) assists companies in overcoming responsible forest management and responsible fiber purchasing challenges while progressing towards credible certification. The New Generations Plantations concept envisions forest plantations that maintain ecosystem integrity, protect high conservation values and are developed through effective stakeholder participation, while contributing to economic growth and employment. The New Generation Plantations platform collects knowledge and good practices in plantation forestry in order to promote better plantation management by sharing this information. WWF´s Check Your Paper database assists business to business information sharing on the forest, water and climate performance of paper brands.  The WWF Water Risk Filter is a free online tool covering all relevant water risk indicators, for all industries and all countries in the world.  WWF`s Climate Savers programme is WWF's global platform to engage business and industry on climate and energy issues.  Contact the WWF International Paper Team .  About WWF WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.
Feed ItemA WWF restoration project in Hungary brings life back to a Danube island
Budapest - WWF has successfully concluded its largest conservation project in Hungary which revitalised a 3 km long side arm and brought back the natural floodplain forest of Liberty Island on the Danube River. The project also contributes to securing drinking water for the citizens of Pecs and Mohacs and enhances opportunities for eco-friendly tourism and recreation in the area. Although part of a nature conservation area, the side branch of the island has been artificially blocked by a rockfill dam more than 30 years ago. The idea was to sustain more water in the main river branch instead of the side arm so that navigation is improved. Additionally, water pipes have been placed in the dam to take drinking water from the wells on one side of the side arm and send it to a purification station on the other. As a result the riverbed has filled up fast. It became a big mud pond with a stagnant surface. Water was flowing only for several days every year, during the highest floods, accelerating sedimentation. WWF and partners decided to revitalise the side arm and create a good quality semi-natural softwood forest on Liberty Island. Both are important alluvial habitats for many fish and birds. The key element of the revitalisation was the opening of the rock fill dam and the dredging of the silted up side arm. Before opening of the dam, the water pipes located inside had to be relocated under the riverbed. During the 5-year restoration process WWF planted native, alluvial softwood forest which is typical of floodplain areas. The non-native tree plantations and colonising invasive plants were removed. After the restoration, the water flowing around the island is always at least two meters deep. There is a continuous connection with the main branch of the Danube River. It is no surprise that the first fish species are already returning to the side branch. Hopefully, they will spawn next spring. Key facts Liberty Island is located in South Hungary at the left side of the Danube River. It is about 3 km long and 150 m wide. Its territory is 47 ha. Liberty Island was purchased by WWF Hungary in 2009 on behalf of the Danube-Drava National Park Directorate with funding from the EU's Life + Nature fund and The Coca-Cola Company. The restoration works were carried out in partnership with the Danube-Drava National Park, the Lower-Danube District Water Management Directorate and the water company DRV.
Feed ItemCaviar from endangered sturgeon not suitable for Christmas
Caviar should be crossed off Christmas gift lists whenever possible to give highly endangered sturgeon a chance to recover in the wild. Sturgeon worldwide are teetering on the brink of extinction because of the persistent trade in their valuable caviar. Although legal fishing is strictly regulated in most countries, illegal fishing and trade continue. Caviar is considered a delicacy and is one of the world's most expensive wildlife products. "It's about being aware of what you buy, and the impact it can have on species and on the environment," said WWF's Sturgeon Expert, Jutta Jahrl, "anyone planning to buy a gift of caviar from wild sturgeon – for example Beluga - should reconsider." All sturgeon species are protected under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). At present, international trade in wild caviar from shared stocks - like the Caspian Sea or the Danube - is not allowed. According to trade statistics, the European Union, the United States and Switzerland are the largest importers of caviar with 81% of all legal caviar imports between 1998 and 2006. France and Germany are the largest markets in Europe. "One century ago, six species of this ancient fish were native to the Danube, but today five of them are classified as critically endangered. The main reason for this dramatic status is the unsustainable appetite for caviar," said Jahrl. In response to declining numbers, most countries along the Danube and the Black Sea have implemented catch and trade bans. Caviar smugglers using sophisticated methods also pose a dangerous threat to sturgeon populations, making saving sturgeon more that just a wildlife protection issue. "The catch and trade ban didn't stop the proliferation of illegal trade in caviar," Jahrl said. "Continuing seizures of illegal caviar in Europe indicate that there is a thriving black market in the whole region." Consumers determined to buy caviar from sturgeon should be cautious and make sure it comes in a tin or jar that is sealed by a non-reusable CITES label. The labelling requirements apply to all caviar, whether from wild caught or from farmed sturgeons. WWF is working to secure the long-term survival of sturgeon with their high natural and economic value. WWF's EU project "Joint actions to raise awareness on overexploitation of Danube sturgeons in Romania and Bulgaria" aims to tackle overfishing and poaching, the main threats to the survival of Danube sturgeon. In addition to overexploitation, sturgeon populations are adversely affected by the construction of dams, which interrupt their spawning migration, and by habitat changes meant to make the Danube more navigable.
Feed ItemWWF and H&M: The journey of water stewardship – year one
One year ago, WWF signed a partnership with the global fashion company H&M with the goal of developing a cutting-edge water stewardship strategy – one that works across the supply chain and can serve as a model for the fashion industry and beyond. "Long-term success in sustainable water management takes time. But this partnership is built on an understanding that water is a shared resource and a shared risk for business, communities and nature. We are on a journey together to create solutions that work for all water users," says Stuart Orr, Head of Water Stewardship at WWF International. In year one, we have already started to see the first achievements of the partnership. "We quickly realised that both organisations share common views and want to achieve tangible results. Since the launch, we have made water awareness part of H&M's global sustainability training for all 104,000 employees. Together, we have mapped water risks for H&M's 500 supplier factories working with wet processes and updated our routines to monitor wastewater treatment. Through the partnership, H&M is also supporting a WWF conservation project in China's Yangtze River basin," said Helena Helmersson, H&M's Head of Sustainability. "The problems of water supply and quality are felt across society, and by the species that rely on freshwater ecosystems. Shared risks to water security require collaborative action," said Jim Leape, Director General of WWF International. "By working with H&M, we want to inspire a shift of the whole fashion industry toward responsible water stewardship. The aims of this partnership are high, and so are the stakes." Going well beyond water efficiency in textile factories, this partnership will advocate for better water management plans in key river basins in China and Bangladesh. These management plans should account for ecological sustainability, continued economic benefits from natural resources and meet people's needs. H&M is also supporting WWF's work to save the iconic Yangtze finless porpoise. The species acts as an indicator of the health of the river system, and is currently under severe stress. Specific activities to safeguard the porpoises include improving sustainable fisheries and decreasing pollution from agriculture through farmer education.
Feed ItemDam threatens survival of Mekong dolphins
Phnom Penh, Cambodia – The Lao government's decision to forge ahead with the Don Sahong hydropower project in southern Laos, located just one kilometre upstream of the core habitat for Mekong dolphins, could precipitate the extinction of the species from the Mekong River, warns a new WWF brief. According to the WWF paper, the dam builders intend to excavate millions of tonnes of rock using explosives, creating strong sound waves that could potentially kill dolphins which have highly sensitive hearing structures. Increased boat traffic, changes in water quality, and habitat degradation represent other major direct risks to the dolphins, along with the cumulative indirect effects of disturbance and stress. "Plans to construct the Don Sahong dam in a channel immediately upstream from these dolphins will likely hasten their disappearance from the Mekong," said Chhith Sam Ath, WWF-Cambodia's Country Director. "The dam's impacts on the dolphins probably cannot be mitigated, and certainly not through the limited and vague plans outlined in the project's environmental impact assessment." Freshwater Irrawaddy dolphins are critically endangered in the Mekong River, where their numbers have dwindled to around 85 individuals restricted to a 190km stretch of the Mekong River mainstream between southern Laos and north-east Cambodia. The dolphins are already threatened from accidental entanglement in gillnets and low calf survival, additional pressures on the population will likely herald their demise. "Pressures on the Mekong dolphins are immense, but as long as they survive there is hope," added Sam Ath. "But the attitude implicit in the dam developer's impact assessment – that the dolphin population is already vulnerable and therefore should not stand in the way of development – will do nothing but seal their fate." In September last year, Laos announced its decision to proceed with the Don Sahong dam on the Mekong mainstream, bypassing the Mekong River Commission's (MRC) consultation process. The dam will block the only channel suitable for year-round fish migration, putting the world's largest inland fishery at risk. Despite objections from neighbouring countries, construction is expected to start soon and finish in early 2018. Alternatives to the Don Sahong dam exist, such as the Thako Project, which could generate approximately the same amount of electricity as Don Sahong but at lower cost and with far less impacts as it does not involve building a barrier across any of the channels of the Mekong mainstream. Unfortunately the Thako project cannot move ahead if the Don Sahong dam proceeds as they would be competing for the same water. "It is not too late to suspend the Don Sahong project and consider smarter alternatives," said Gerry Ryan, Technical Advisor with WWF-Cambodia and author of the brief. "Not building the Don Sahong dam is not an irreparable blow to the development aspirations of Laos, or their ability to produce electricity, but building it will almost certainly cause the extirpation of their dolphins and threaten critical fisheries." Mekong dolphins also have great cultural significance to local communities and bring tangible livelihood benefits. "Dolphin-watching tours are a major contributor to growth, bringing in much needed income to local communities," added Ryan. "It is clear that saving the dolphins also means smart development." The dolphins are also an important indicator of the health and sound management of the freshwater resources, and their decline could signal a potentially devastating decline in the health of the entire river ecosystem. WWF is calling for the suspension of the Don Sahong dam to allow decisions to be reached using sound science and in consultation with impacted countries. "Lower Mekong countries are bound by the MRC agreement to hold inter-governmental consultations before proceeding with dams that impact their neighbours," said Sam Ath. "Laos' failure to honour the consultation agreement is threatening transboundary cooperation, the livelihoods and food security of millions, and critically endangered species."
Feed ItemPowerful tool helps explain water risk
Gland, Switzerland: Water crises ranked third among 10 global risks of highest concern in 2014, according to the World Economic Forum's annual Global Risks Perception Survey. With water risk on the agenda of business and investors as never before, WWF unveils its updated Water Risk Filter. The free online tool allows users to map production facilities, supply chains and commodities. The new version of the website includes data on more than 120 agricultural commodities – including cotton, palm oil and corn – making it the most sophisticated tool for tracking water risk exposure. "What we're seeing with water is a real convergence of the business agenda and the conservation agenda," says Jochem Verberne, Head of Corporate Relations at WWF International. "Companies and investors are beginning to understand that their futures depend on a natural resource that is shared among many users. That creates business risk, and it creates incentive to be part of the solution. The Water Risk Filter can help." The Water Risk Filter generates a score based on the physical, regulatory and reputational risk related to water in basins around the world. It also includes an extensive risk mitigation toolbox, allowing the user to reference relevant case studies demonstrating actions to improve water management. Although now much more powerful, the Water Risk Filter remains too easy not to use. By simply inputting a facility location or a commodity and where it's grown, the user will receive information identifying risk hot spots. Once those locations have been identified, the user can review possible responses in the filter's mitigation toolbox. Close to 50,000 individual facilities have been assessed by the Water Risk Filter since its original release. Over 1,500 different organizations have used the tool, including global fashion retailer H&M, which utilized the filter when creating a new water strategy for its entire value chain. "The Water Risk Filter helped us see all the places where water touches our business, and create strategies to address raw material risks, support supplier factories and improve efficiency in our own stores and offices," says Felix Ockborn, Environmental Sustainability Coordinator for water at H&M. "The tool helped us see that working beyond our direct operations to promote sustainable water management is in the best interest of our business." First released by WWF in 2012, the Water Risk Filter was developed in collaboration with the German development finance institution DEG. The website can be accessed at http://waterriskfilter.panda.org/ .
Feed ItemNGOs set one-year deadline to stop Xayaburi dam
Bangkok, Thailand – Leading non-governmental organisations (NGOs) today issued a joint declaration in opposition to on-going construction of the Xayaburi dam on the Mekong River mainstem, and called on the Thai government to cancel the Power Purchase Agreement relating to the controversial hydropower project. The declaration, signed by 40 international and national NGOs and civil society group s, including International Rivers and WWF, comes ahead of this week's Mekong River Commission (MRC) Summit, attended by heads of government from the four Lower Mekong countries. The summit will address challenges facing the Mekong River Basin and regional cooperation. As the first dam to enter the MRC's consultation process, the Xayaburi project is a crucial test case for 10 other dams proposed for the Lower Mekong mainstem. The MRC process requires countries to jointly review projects proposed for the Mekong mainstem with an aim to reach consensus on whether they proceed or not. "Cambodia and Viet Nam have never approved of the Xayaburi dam. Nevertheless, Laos is marching ahead with construction without agreement among its neighbours," said Kraisak Choonhavan, leading environmental activist and former Chairman of Thailand's Senate Foreign Affairs Committee. "The Xayaburi project severely weakens the legitimacy of the MRC and threatens the health and productivity of the Mekong River and Delta, which could leave millions facing food insecurity. The Mekong Summit is the critical moment for Cambodia and Viet Nam to take a strong stance and make their concerns heard loud and clear before it's too late." According to Pöyry, the Finnish consulting firm advising Laos on the dam engineering, a coffer dam - used to divert the river's flow away from the in-river construction site - will be built in the first quarter of 2015. This will be the first direct intervention in the river bed during the dry season, and will mark the start of major irreversible environmental impacts. Thailand main consumer of energy produced by Xayaburi dam Thailand is slated to be the prime consumer of the electricity produced by the $US3.8 billion Xayaburi dam, and a syndicate of six Thai banks is financing the project, despite the acute environmental and social costs, and the uncertainties surrounding the financial return of the project. "It's not too late to stop this disastrous dam before irreversible harm occurs early next year," said Dr. Saranarat Oy Kanjanavanit, Secretary-General of Thailand's Green World Foundation. "Thailand must act responsibly and cancel its premature power purchase agreement until there is regional consensus on mainstem Mekong dams. And if the Thai banks reconsider their risk assessments, and value their international reputation and financial returns, they'd do well to pull out of this project." One of the world's most damaging dams In the joint declaration, the organizations recognise the Xayaburi project as one of the potentially most damaging dams currently under construction anywhere in the world, constituting the greatest transboundary threat to date to food security, sustainable development and regional cooperation in the Lower Mekong, and that the project's Environmental Impact Assessment does not meet any internationally-accepted standards. Expert reviews of Xayaburi dam have identified serious gaps in data and weaknesses with the proposed fish passes for the mega dam, and confirmed the Xayaburi project will block part of the sediment flow, destabilising the river's ecosystem upon which farmers, fishers and many other economic sectors depend. "Without the results of the on-going environmental studies, dam development on the lower Mekong mainstream is now largely guesswork," said Ame Trandem, Southeast Asia Programme Director for International Rivers. "But Laos expects its neighbours to take a dangerous leap of faith and trust that the risks associated with this project will somehow be resolved while construction moves ahead. This dubious approach not only pre-empts the conclusions of the studies, but clearly contravenes international best practice." The Lower Mekong, one of the world's last large untamed stretches of river, supports nearly 60 million people with its rich fisheries. In order for migratory fish to move up and down the river they would need swim through the dam via the proposed fish passages. No proven solutions for mitigating Xayaburi dam's impacts "There are no internationally accepted, technologically proven solutions for mitigating the Xayaburi dam's impacts on fish migrations and sediment flows," said Marc Goichot, Sustainable Hydropower Lead with WWF-Greater Mekong. "Resting the future of the Mekong on flawed analysis could have dire consequences for the livelihoods of millions of people living in the Mekong Basin." The NGO coalition supports Viet Nam's official response to the MRC's consultation process on 15 April, 2011 in which Viet Nam strongly requested "that the decision on the Xayaburi hydropower project as well as all other planned hydropower projects on the Mekong mainstem be deferred for at least 10 years", a recommendation previously stated by the MRC's 2010 Environmental Assessment for proposed mainstem dams. Progression and impacts of xayaburi dam construction from fmkellogg
Feed ItemAmazon survey investigates fish and communities in region targeted for hydropower development
WWF has launched a 12-day survey of Brazil's Juruena River focusing on migratory fish species and how communities near the river use its resources. The Juruena River flows through Juruena National Park, feeds the magnificent Salto Augusto falls, and is part of the wider Amazon basin. The study will target a fish species known locally as "matrinxã" (Brycon amazonicus). Ayslaner Gallo, one of the project's coordinators, says the bigger specimens of fish will be tagged so they can be tracked by remote monitoring systems. "With the tracking information in hand, we can come back to the region and find out what happened to these animals, see where they are and how they have developed, and identify other aspects of their behaviour," Gallo says. To better understand the pressures on the river as well as the services it provides, the research team will interview community members in Aldeia do Pontal, Barra de São Manoel and Colares, and isolated families living along the banks of the Juruena and Teles Pires rivers. Fishermen will be asked about which fish species they catch most, how often they fish, and how many fishermen are active in the area. The data will be tabulated to obtain a profile of all fishing activities in the vicinity. "This initial study is designed to build our knowledge of migratory fish species dynamics, and the social and economic aspects of the communities in regard to available resources," says Claudio Maretti, leader of WWF's Living Amazon Initiative. The Juruena River is situated in the larger Tapajos River basin. "The Brazilian government has identified the Tapajos River basin is the next frontier for hydroelectric projects in the Amazon. The construction of a hydroelectric dam completely alters the ecological, social and economic dynamics of a region. So it is of fundamental importance to get to know those aspects beforehand," says Maretti. WWF has supported five expeditions to the Juruena National Park since 2006, and another two in the surrounding Southern Amazon region. Each was designed to enhance scientific understanding of the region's geography and biodiversity, with the goal of informing community and government decisions about how to manage natural resources. In 2013, WWF donated a floating research base to the Juruena National Park and supported workshops aimed at stimulating community-based tourism as well as other sustainable economic activities. For more information, contact Denise Oliveira, Communication Coordinator, Doliveira@wwf.org.br   61 8175.2695 / 61 3364.7497
Feed ItemGlobal freshwater conservation gains momentum among UN countries
Thirty-five member countries of the United Nations have now officially agreed to common guidelines for sharing and managing freshwater resources that cross international borders. With Vietnam's ratification, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Non-Navigational Uses of International Watercourses (UNWC) will go into effect in August, transforming the way governments share fresh water and settle water-related disputes. The agreement comes at a crucial moment. Climate change is influencing water quality and quantities, and people and wildlife are experiencing more volatile periods of droughts and floods. Growing populations and incomes are changing how people live, increasing and diversifying the demands placed on fresh water. Developing countries especially are using their water resources in new ways, particularly for industry and energy. There are 276 international rivers worldwide, with 60 per cent of the planet's freshwater flows. What one country does with its water impacts all others that share the same freshwater system. The UNWC will help countries manage local water concerns in a way that protects freshwater resources and ecosystems throughout an entire basin. Vietnam represents the first Asian country to ratify the UNWC, and does so from a particularly important region: the Greater Mekong . The Mekong River passes through six countries and fuels the 'rice bowl' of Asia. It is the world's most productive inland fishery, supporting the livelihoods and food security of some 60 million people. "This new set of rules is good for both people and nature," says Lifeng Li, Director of WWF's global freshwater programme. "Habitats and wildlife are not bound by national borders, and some of the most important conservation areas are linked to international rivers and lakes. "WWF has been working with countries and partners around the world to raise awareness of the UNWC and sow the seeds of cooperation. We look forward to supporting the roll-out of the guidelines and continuing to encourage nations to ratify and implement the convention in support of better water management," says Li.
Feed ItemEffects of Laos dam project to be revealed
WWF welcomes the Lao Government's decision to have the Don Sahong hydropower project undergo a formal consultation process, a decision likely to delay construction of the project. The consultation process requires Laos to hold inter-governmental consultations before proceeding with the dam, and conduct and share studies on the project's environmental and the social impacts. The process will take at least six months to complete. "Laos is now promising to do what they already signed up to under the Mekong agreement, and should have done months ago" said Marc Goichot, WWF-Greater Mekong's lead on sustainable hydropower. "Their decision to consult on the Don Sahong project, and share critical details about the project's impacts, comes after intense pressure from neighbouring countries. It is critical that pressure is maintained to ensure Laos delivers on their promise." In September last year, Laos announced its decision to proceed with the Don Sahong dam, bypassing the Mekong River Commision's (MRC) consultation process. The much-criticised project was discussed at the June 26-27 meeting of the MRC - an inter-governmental agency made up of representatives from the four Lower Mekong nations -- Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam. The Don Sahong dam threatens the Mekong's critically endangered Irrawaddy dolphins and will block the only channel available for dry-season fish migration, putting the world's largest inland fishery at risk. Close to 200,000 people have signed WWF's petition calling on the dam builder, Mega First, to pull out of the project. "We thank people around the world who signed the WWF's petition to stop the Don Sahong dam," added Goichot. "Mega First would do well to listen to the growing voices of opposition to this disastrous project and reconsider their engagement." The Don Sahong dam is the second dam on the Lower Mekong mainstem, following the controversial Xayaburi dam that Laos has begun constructing despite opposition from neighbouring Cambodia and Vietnam. "The Mekong River Commission's joint decision-making process was effectively broken in 2012 when Laos decided unilaterally to proceed with Xayaburi dam, against the express wishes of Vietnam and Cambodia," added Goichot. "There is currently little faith in the MRC's process to ensure joint decisions are made for the benefit of all Mekong nations. If Laos fails to be held to account, the MRC will soon lose its legitimacy and 60 million people living in the Mekong basin will suffer."
Feed ItemHow To Help Farmers Help The Reef
In 2008, the Australian government launched an initiative, Reef Rescue, aimed at protecting and restoring the environment. Last year, Amanda Cornwall, a legal and policy consultant, discussed the program advising that it needs to focus in on assisting farmers in improving water quality. That means learning from other successful schemes, she says.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: <br />Nature And The Nexus
Ecosystem Marketplace is gearing up for the 2014 State of Watershed Payments report. The report will cover the water energy food nexus and watershed investments among other topics. Meanwhile, EM is also preparing for Katoomba XX in Lima Peru where discussions will focus on aligning climate policy with other commitments that support resilient ecosystems and societies.
Feed ItemBuying Hope and Time for Coral Reef
Between now and August, we’ll be examining the economic benefits of coral reefs and financing mechanisms designed to help preserve them. Here’s a look at the other side of that equation: what it costs to maintain them, and the challenge of meeting that cost through conventional means.
Feed ItemPeruvian Ecosystem Services Law In Limbo On Eve Of 20th Katoomba Meeting In Lima
Peruvians have spent the last six years developing a comprehensive legal framework for the sticky issue of payments for ecosystem services (PES). The current bill is one of the most advanced pieces of legislation of its type, but it’s been stuck in committee for five years, and will remain so as the 20th Katoomba Meeting kicks off next week in Lima.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: Nestle, General Mills Sign On To International Water Standard
Two annual meetings take place this week and Ecosystem Marketplace will be on hand to cover them both. Meanwhile, EM's 2014 water survey wrapped up last week and water cooperation received a boost with Nestle and General Mills signing on to the International Water Stewardship Standard.
Feed ItemUS Chamber Of Commerce Aims To Promote Food Security Through Sustainable Management Of Water And Energy
Global demand for both water and energy is spiraling upward, with long-term implications for food security. Several private-sector initiatives have emerged to promote more coordination of energy and water issues, and this week the US Chamber of Commerce Foundation will offer insight into what works and what doesn’t.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: Breaking Down Nexus Silos
Businesses embrace the water energy nexus with innovative water-saving techniques and energy efficient measures. D.C. based non-profit, the Chamber of Commerce Foundation, highlighted companies' success stories in a recent report and event that took place in May. In other news, H&M's water stewardship efforts in China face new challenges and the US West continues to practice water cooperation.
Feed ItemPeruvian Congress Passes <br />Historic Ecosystem Services Law
Six years in the making, Peru's new Ecosystem Services Law passed on Thursday, providing a comprehensive legal framework for the sticky issue of payments for ecosystem services (PES). It is one of the most advanced pieces of legislation of its type, but had been stuck in committee for five years. Here is the latest from Lima.
Feed ItemThe Water-Energy-Food Nexus: Interlinked Solutions For Interlinked Challenges
In order to solve global freshwater scarcity challenges while providing enough food and energy for a growing population, the linkages between water, energy and food security must be fully understood. Here’s a look at how our demands for energy, food and water all drive each other, and how we can prevent them from driving in the wrong direction.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: Yorkshire Water Accounts for NatCap Impacts
Natural capital accounting receives another boost as a UK water utility becomes the first of its kind to develop an environmental profit & loss account. Payments for ecosystem services (PES) received a boost as well with passage of Peru's PES law that establishes a framework for compensation between providers and beneficiaries.
Feed ItemSenate Inquiry slams monitoring of environmental offsets
Feed Item10 ways to use tech and smart business practices to conserve water
Feed ItemMore people, less water mean rising food imports for Egypt
Feed ItemThe Future of Agriculture
Feed ItemAlong the Rio Grande, An Innovative Water Market Restores Riverside Habitat
Feed ItemChina's arid north feeds water-rich south
Feed ItemIt's slow going for businesses aiming to tackle Tanzania's water problems
Feed ItemAssessing Water Risk – A learning journey
Feed ItemYunnan tops in China for wetland biodiversity
Feed ItemNatural capital helps businesses put environmental metrics into context
Feed ItemTexas ranks high among 6.5 million coastal homes at storm-surge risk
Feed ItemBerkeley County, SC, taking stock of lakes, forests and other green spaces
Feed ItemSW China, ADB cooperate to finance watershed protection
Feed ItemEnvisioning Profit in Environmental Good Works
Feed ItemWest-Slope Colorado Towns Restore Local Flows, Even as Thirsty Front-Range Lawns Drink From their Rivers
Feed ItemChao Lake :The PRC’s extensive water management framework extends vertically and horizontally from the central government to its townships and villages
Chao Lake, the fifth largest in the People’s Republic of China, struggled to overcome one of the most serious eutrophication problems in the country caused by decades of pollution spurred by economic growth pressures.   The State Council decided to create an integrated management authority for Chao Lake in Anhui Province, the first such body in the country. The authority oversees land use planning, water quality and quantity issues, fisheries, navigation, and tourism. The authority can build on the results of earlier projects to improve watershed management and tackle waste management in townships and villages, as well as agricultural non-point source pollution and industrial waste management.   This is an excerpt of a case study from WaterWealth, a publication on basin management across Asia and the Pacific. WaterWealth is available for download on the IUCN and ADB websites   Interactive map:       Comment on this item by joining the LinkedIn group "riversnetwork.org"
Feed ItemBringing Back the Colorado River Delta - 2013
A new agreement between Mexico and the United States called Minute 319 will ensure more water flows into the Colorado River delta in Mexico, helping to restore parts of the once fertile region. Related article: http://nyti.ms/ZI94Hc Please visit http://nyti.ms/13qMiXp in order to embed this video Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n NYT on Google Plus: http://bit.ly/WnAshF Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/nytimesvideo   Comment on this item by joining the LinkedIn group "riversnetwork.org"
Feed ItemBrantas River Basin : A monitoring system has been established where stakeholder reporting, water quality monitoring and routine inspection are carried out
The Brantas basin in East Java supplies water to about 16 million users, but suffers from poor water quality due to rapid population growth and industrialization.   To tackle growing pollution, Jasa Tirta I Public Corporation (PJT I), the basin’s autonomous management corporation, has developed a monitoring system with three components: stakeholder reporting, water quality sampling, and routine inspection.   This is an excerpt of a case study from WaterWealth, a publication on basin management across Asia and the Pacific. WaterWealth is available for download on the IUCN and ADB websites   Interactive map:       Comment on this item by joining the LinkedIn group "riversnetwork.org"
Feed ItemBangalore Lake Diaries
Bangalore was once called the city of a 1000 lakes. Over time, we lost most of our lakes to urbanization, sewage dumping, encroachment and rapid development. This community film made by The Alternative and Korkai chronicles the pioneering lake conservation efforts undertaken by the city to combat the water crisis by preserving its only freshwater source - lakes.   You are here: Home # Displaying items by tag: _Selection
Feed ItemBali's traditional Subak irrigation system, a UNESCO's World Heritage
Bali's traditional Subak irrigation system has been announced as UNESCO's World Heritage ( June 29, 2012 )   Comment on this item by joining the LinkedIn group "riversnetwork.org"
Feed ItemAzzam Alwash: Lessons from Iraq's beautiful marshes
Azzam Alwash is the Founder and President of Nature Iraq, an NGO dedicated to protecting and preserving Iraq's natural environment and rich cultural heritage.   Comment on this item by joining the LinkedIn group "riversnetwork.org"
Feed ItemArizona's Bill Williams River (Nature Conservancy)
Learn how a partnership between the Conservancy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is improving the health of this river and the surrounding habitat, which supports more than 350 species of birds and a wide array of other animals.   Comment on this item by joining the LinkedIn group "riversnetwork.org"
Feed ItemAlaska: Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge
The Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge is a protected wetland area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It encompasses most of the Yukon Flats, a vast wetland area centered on the confluence of the Yukon River, Porcupine River, and Chandalar River. The area is a major waterfowl breeding ground, and after a proposal to flood the Yukon Flats via a dam on the Yukon River was turned down, the Yukon Flats were deemed worthy of protection. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act established the refuge in 1980. It is the third-largest National Wildlife Refuge in the United States, although it is less than one-half the size of either of the two largest, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, or the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is administered from offices in Fairbanks.   Comment on this item by joining the LinkedIn group "riversnetwork.org"
Feed ItemA wetland once leased to private parties now belongs to the community
Lying in northeast Bangladesh, the Tanguar Haor wetland forms part of the wetland and floodplain complex of the Surma and Kushiyara river basins. About half of Tanguar Haor’s area comprises waterbodies and almost a third cropland. The wetland provides habitats for many different species of waterbirds and fish.   IUCN Bangladesh, in 2006, on behalf of the Ministry of Environment and Forests, launched the Community-based Sustainable Management of Tanguar Hoar Project with funds from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC). Over a period of two years, the project has enabled communities in Tanguar Haor to negotiate and implement measures for managing the wetland and improving their livelihoods. A particular achievement has been the transfer of fishing rights from private parties to the local communities involved in management. Tanguar Haor is overseen by a successful co-management body with representatives from central and local government, and the local communities.   This is an excerpt of a case study from WaterWealth, a publication on basin management across Asia and the Pacific. WaterWealth is available for download on the IUCN and ADB websites   Interactive map:       Comment on this item by joining the LinkedIn group "riversnetwork.org"
Feed Item4Ps rivers : Cambodia’s Water Law supports strategic investments in developing water resources, and promotes transparent, accountable and participatory water management
The 4Ps River basin consists of four sub-basins of the Mekong River — the Prek Preah, Prek Krieng, Prek Kampi and Prek Te. Located in eastern Cambodia, the basin is still mostly covered by forests. About 1% of the area is cultivated, and a quarter of this is irrigated. Poverty is still widespread and local people are vulnerable to floods and drought.   In 2007, a Functional Water Partnership — a network of focal points for dialogue on integrated water management — was formed in the four sub-basins. The dialogue focused on economic development and poverty alleviation, environmental protection, social development, flood and drought management, integration through basin planning, and water resources information management. The Cambodia Water Partnership (CamboWP) and the 4Ps Basin Functional Water Partnership have been established as a result of this project.   This is an excerpt of a case study from WaterWealth, a publication on basin management across Asia and the Pacific. WaterWealth is available for download on the IUCN and ADB websites   Interactive map:   You are here: Home # Displaying items by tag: _Selection
Feed ItemFlexibility and adaptability: ingredients for transboundary success
By Juan Carlos Sanchez of IUCN’s Environmental Law Centre. One of the key messages coming from this year’s World Water Week in Stockholm is that climate change presents an opportunity for transboundary cooperation. After a series of seminars on this topic, there seem to be several arguments that support this. It is clear that a […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Flexibility and adaptability: ingredients for transboundary success appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemTalk of rivers and flooded forests
By Jane Lawton, Head of Communications, IUCN Asia. The word ‘dialogue’ may be somewhat overused in our development lexicon, but the recent meeting of the Mekong Water Dialogues I attended in Siem Reap, Cambodia provided a powerful example of what we really mean by effective dialogue in action. The meeting brought together national teams from […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Talk of rivers and flooded forests appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemShaking the bottle: reforming policy and improving water management
By James Dalton of IUCN’s Global Water Programme. Version française A year ago I wrote a blog post on a workshop that we jointly held with the Ramsar Secretariat in partnership with Danone Waters – the bottled water arm of the French multinational. It caught people’s attention, partly because of what we were doing, and […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Shaking the bottle: reforming policy and improving water management appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemFloods, finance, fears and fallacies
By James Dalton of IUCN’s Water Programme. Flooding is the most common hydrological hazard – with global economic losses from floods averaging US$3 billion a year, predicted to become US$1 trillion a year by 2050. Over the last 100 years they have also been the most fatal disasters, ruining families, communities, and at times, setting […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Floods, finance, fears and fallacies appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemIndus River dolphin calves successfully rescued in eastern Pakistan
 Sukkur, Pakistan: A joint team of WWF-Pakistan and the Sindh Wildlife Department recently rescued two stray Indus River dolphin calves caught in a canal in eastern Pakistan. The calves, a male and female, were stranded in the Dehar Wah canal for two hours before the successful rescue saw them released 80 km downstream. Joint rescue teams from WWF-Pakistan and the Sindh Wildlife Department regularly carry out these operations. The stranded dolphins are carefully captured, placed on a stretcher, kept moist with water and wet towels, and transported in a sound-proof vehicle and released in the main stream of the Indus River. The stranding of Indus River dolphins in irrigation canals is a potential threat to their existing population. Dolphins regularly travel back and forth into irrigation canals when canal gates are open and during canal closure the water level drops and dolphins become trapped in small pools with depleting fish supply. Intensive fishing in canals during closure period also aggravates the risk of net entanglements of these endangered dolphins. Since January 2013, four successful rescue operations have been carried out resulting in the rescue of five dolphins. WWF-Pakistan launched the first phase of the "Indus River Dolphin Conservation Project" (IRDCP) in 2004 with the goal of preserving the dolphin's genetic variability, conserving the biological diversity of the lower Indus River eco-system, ensuring sustainable use of river biological diversity and promoting actions to ease pollution and wasteful extraction of river resources, the second phase was launched in 2007. The Indus River Dolphin Conservation Project focuses on the root causes of biodiversity loss by linking the protection of the Indus River Dolphin with measures in the agricultural and fisheries sectors. Eco-tourism is also part of the project with dolphin watching tours and the new Indus Dolphin Conservation Centre in Sukkur. The project combines conservation work with the improvement of the livelihood of local communities. The Indus River dolphin is one of the world's rarest mammal and most endangered cetaceans. A 2011 dolphin population survey estimated the population to be 1,297 individuals.
Feed ItemWWF highlights global framework for water cooperation
Stockholm – With only a handful of countries needed before the UN Convention on the Law of the Non-Navigational Uses of International Watercourses (UNWC) enters into force, WWF and the Centre for Water Law, Policy and Science, University of Dundee present new research to better understand and implement this important global framework for water cooperation. Globally, there are 276 internationally shared watersheds, which drain the territories of 145 countries and represent more than 40 per cent of the Earth's land surface. The UNWC establishes the rights and duties of states sharing freshwater systems. It is designed to foster interstate cooperation on the sustainable management of transboundary waters in accordance with international law. To date, the convention counts 30 contracting states – only five short of the number required for entry into force, which now looks imminent. The joint WWF-CWLPS edited collection, "The UN Watercourses Convention in Force: Strengthening international law for transboundary water management," published by Earthscan, provides an assessment of the role and relevance of the UNWC as a key component of transboundary water governance. This unique collection draws together a decade of work led by WWF, along with numerous partners, to raise awareness and deepen knowledge of the UNWC among key stakeholders. The UNWC Global Initiative aims to contribute to the better management and protection of the world's iconic transboundary river basins, which include priority watersheds such as the Amazon, Congo and Mekong. The book includes contributions from more than 30 world-renowned experts in the multidisciplinary field of transboundary water management. The contributions describe the drafting and negotiation of the UNWC; the value of its entry into force; its relationship to other multilateral environmental agreements and development goals; and, through a series of case studies, the specific role of the convention at various levels across Latin America, Africa and Asia. The book concludes by proposing how the convention's future implementation might further strengthen international water cooperation. Flavia Rocha Loures, Senior Program Officer with WWF-US and a co-editor of the book, says the entry in force of the UNWC is vital to promote continued and peaceful collaboration and dialogue between riparian states, and will represent a significant step toward the better management, use and protection of transboundary waters. "We hope this book advances recognition of international law in general and the UNWC in particular as crucial tools for enabling the integrated management and sustainable development of international watercourses and the vital ecosystems services they provide for people and nature," she says. Join WWF to learn about the UN Watercourses Convention at Stockholm World Water Week Tuesday, 3 September 18:00, Booth B03:40 About the co-editors and other contributors: Flavia Rocha Loures is a Senior Program Officer, International Law and Policy, in the Freshwater Program of WWF-US, based in Washington, DC. Alistair Rieu-Clarke is a Reader in International Law at the Centre for Water Law, Policy & Science (under the auspices of UNESCO), at the University of Dundee, UK. Among the book's contributors are renowned international experts in the areas of international law and policy, political science and freshwater conservation. For further information and to order the book, please visit: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781849714464/ Ms. Loures is available for interviews, and can speak on the potential for conflict between countries sharing waters and the tools that exist to prevent them; and climate change impacts on international rivers and examples of cooperative responses. She can be contacted by phone or email: Flavia.loures@wwfus.org , +1 202 6409055
Feed ItemEmergency Meeting of the Mekong River Commission Urgently Needed &#8211; WWF
Bangkok, Thailand – In the wake of the Laos government's decision this week to proceed with the Don Sahong dam on the Mekong River mainstream, bypassing the Mekong River Commission (MRC) process for consultation, WWF calls on Lower Mekong ministers to hold an emergency meeting. "The MRC was effectively broken in November last year when Laos decided unilaterally to proceed with the controversial Xayaburi dam, against the express wishes of Vietnam and Cambodia," said WWF International Director General Jim Leape. "It is impossible to imagine that the Mekong River can be harnessed sustainably without the MRC functioning properly, ensuring joint decisions are reached on dam developments that are to the benefit of all. "The four Lower Mekong countries must immediately revisit the spirit of the original MRC agreement and meet urgently to resolve their differences and fix the consultation process before any other dam projects are considered. If the countries fail to get serious about their obligation to cooperate, they risk sabotaging both the MRC and management of one of the world's great rivers." On the 30 September 2013, the Laos government notified the MRC – an inter-governmental agency made up of representatives from the four Lower Mekong countries – of its decision to proceed with the development of the Don Sahong hydropower project in the Siphandone area of southern Laos. The Don Sahong dam will block the only channel available for dry-season fish migrations on the Mekong River, putting the world's largest inland fishery at risk. The project's construction is expected to start next month and be finished by February 2018. Under the MRC agreement, all dams on the mainstream of the Mekong, which include the Don Sahong and Xayaburi dams, should go through the MRC's consultation process. This process allows for a minimum 6-month consultation with other countries to review the development projects with an aim to reach consensus on whether they should proceed. "The Mekong is a shared river, and the four countries are bound by the MRC agreement to hold inter-governmental consultations before proceeding with dam developments that impact their neighbours," said Leape. "Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand need to voice their concerns now about Laos' continued failures to honour the consultation agreement. Without effective transboundary cooperation, the livelihoods and food security of 60 million people are in jeopardy." Environment and water ministers from the four Lower Mekong countries had agreed in 2011 to delay a decision on building the US$3.5 billion Xayaburi dam pending further studies on its environmental impacts. Nonetheless, the Laos government decided to forge ahead with construction without consensus among its neighbours or notifying the MRC. Vietnam has also previously requested that no further developments on the Mekong mainstream occur until the Mekong mainstream dams study, agreed upon by the MRC in 2011, is completed. "The Xayaburi dam is a dangerous experiment," said WWF's Dr. Jian-hua Meng, WWF's Sustainable Hydropower Specialist. "The risk to fisheries, fish migration and impacts from sediment effects are immense, and the consequences for downstream countries dire. There are 11 dams planned on the lower mainstream of the Mekong, and the region can't afford to get a single one wrong. "There are locations on the Mekong that are suitable for genuinely sustainable hydropower, but the Lower Mekong countries must urgently get the MRC back on track to broker those negotiations and fill the major science and data gaps, or risk building dams by guesswork." WWF advises Lower Mekong countries considering hydropower projects to prioritise dams on some Mekong tributaries that are easier to assess and are considered to have a much lower impact and risk. 
Feed ItemWWF launches Green Heart of Europe to protect nature across 12 countries
Salamanca/Vienna: WWF launched a new initiative to save and protect nature across 12 countries in Central and Eastern Europe. The Green Heart of Europe aims to protect the five natural riches of the region: forests, wilderness, large carnivores, rivers and wetlands, and the Danube sturgeon. WWF launched the Green Heart of Europe at WILD 10 , the World Wilderness Congress in Salamanca, Spain, which gathers governments, businesses, conservation and development NGOs, as well as community representatives from around the world to discuss the protection and sustainable development of natural habitats on our planet. "From the Danube basin to the Carpathian Mountains, our region, the Green Heart of Europe, includes many of the continent's greatest natural treasures. WWF has been working since the 1990s to save it for the benefit of local people and humanity," says Andreas Beckmann, Director of WWF's Danube-Carpathian Programme. The new WWF initiative covers the largest remaining area of virgin and natural forests in Europe outside of northern Scandinavia and Russia (with the primeval beech forests of Ukraine and Slovakia) and Europe's most spectacular remaining wilderness areas outside of Russia (including the southern Carpathians and the Danube Delta). The initiative will see better collaboration among partners such as government, NGOs and local communities as well as ensuring the full implementation of existing tools like regional and international protection frameworks, strong legislation and government commitments to ensure the protection of this diverse region. The region shelters two-thirds of the European populations of large carnivores such as bears, lynx and wolves. The Green Heart of Europe also includes most of Europe's last remaining intact rivers and wetlands, including the globally important Lower Danube Green Corridor and the Mura-Drava-Danube corridor, also known as "Europe's Amazon." These waters are home to the Beluga sturgeon, a 7-meter fish that has survived since the time of the dinosaurs, but now teeters on the edge of extinction. "The people of this region depend on these natural treasures. They provide us with essential goods and services, from timber and fish to clean water and climate regulation, and the essential 'green infrastructure' that secures our livelihoods and well-being," said WWF's Conservation Director for Central and Eastern Europe, Orieta Hulea. Unsustainable resource use and poorly planned infrastructure are causing the loss and fragmentation of forests, wetlands and wilderness. The treasures of the Green Heart of Europe are threatened by illegal and unsustainable logging of virgin and other high conservation value Forests, construction of roads, ski areas and other infrastructure, some of it illegal and much of it poorly planned. The rampant building of hundreds of large and small hydro and wind-power stations – many with limited benefits in terms of clean energy, but with massive impacts for streams, rivers and wildlife – and unsustainable agricultural practices are also threats. "We already have many of the tools needed to save the Green Heart of Europe. We have strong legislation, regional and international protection frameworks, government commitments, economic incentives and strong partnerships," says Beckmann. "Now we need to bring these together and ensure they are fully implemented to achieve their intended purpose."
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-006
“Revise of preliminary Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis for the Russian Federation”, application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 31
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-007
«Revise of preliminary Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis for Mongolia», application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 31
Feed ItemRFQ/EMO/2012-008
"Study on the Selenga Delta habitat and the health of the benthic zone", application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 21
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-009
“Study on Selenga Delta water quality issues”, application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 21
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-010
“Conducting baseline study and drafting sub-basin management plans - Mongolia”, application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 21
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-011
“Database for modeling and simulation of pollutants transport in the Baikal Basin”, application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 21
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-012
“Harmonized water quality monitoring program for the Baikal Basin”, application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 21
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-013
“Strategy for (dead) livestock disposal”, application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 21
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-014
"Biodiversity compatible tourism plan for Baikal State Nature Biosphere Reserve", application period: 2012 June 14 - 2012 June 25
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-016
“Baikal Information Center (BIC) Conception”, application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 25
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-021
“Ecological Education Enhancement Plan”, application period: 2012 April 28 - 2012 May 31
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-027
“Developing Harmonized water quality monitoring program for the Baikal Basin in Mongolia and accomplishing the initial Pollution Hotspot analyses”, application period: 2012 June 04 - 2012 June 14
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-028
“Shoreline cleanup campaigns for Lake Baikal and the Selenga River”, application period: 2012 June 28 - 2012 July 09
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-029
“Baikal Information Center (BIC) Conception for Mongolia”, application period: 2012 August 17 - 2012 September 07
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-030
“Shoreline clean-up of Hovsgol lake and setup of a water sanitation zone in Khatgal village”, application period: 2012 August 17 - 2012 September 07
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-031
"BIC information data exchange protocol Russia", application period: 2012 August 31 - 2012 September 27
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-032
«Biodiversity compatible recreational tourism plan for Zabaikalsky National Park», application period: 2012 August 31 - 2012 September 27
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-033
“Pilot construction of cattle mortuary in Barguzinsky district, Buryatia, The Russian Federation”, application period: 2012 September 21 - 2012 October 11
Feed ItemRFQ_EMO_2012-034
“Pilot construction of cattle mortuary in Kurumkansky district, Buryatia, The Russian Federation”; application period: 2012 September 11 - 2012 October 03
Feed ItemNew year holidays
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/334
Senior Law Expert, application period: 2012 April 20 - 2012 May 20
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/457
Training Expert - Russia; application period: 2012 April 30 - 2012 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/411
Consultant on Pollution Hotspot Analysis - Russia; application period: 2012 April 30 - 2012 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/414
Consultant on Pollution Hotspot Analysis - Mongolia; application period: 2012 April 30 - 2012 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/463
Environmental and Water Resources Management Consultant for sub-basin Khilok watershed/Zabaikalsky krai, Russia; application period: 2012 April 30 - 2012 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/460
Environmental and Water Resources Management Consultant for sub-basin Tugnuy-Sukhara watershed/Buryatia, Russia; application period: 2012 April 30 - 2012 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/458
Training Expert - Mongolia; application period: 2012 April 30 - 2012 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/413
Communication and Public Awareness Expert - Mongolia; application period: 2012 April 30 - 2012 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/412
Communication and Public Awareness Expert - Russia; application period: 2012 April 30 - 2012 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/404
Project Administration and Finance Officer (Mongolia), application period: 2012 May 03 - 2012 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/402
TDA Consultant and Scientific Advisory Group Leader, application period: 2012 May 03 - 2012 May 27
Feed ItemBaikal International economic forum 2012
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/1304
Biodiversity Expert, application period: 2012 October 15 - 2012 October 22
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/1372
Climate Change Consultant, application period: 2012 October 31 - 2012 November 07
Feed ItemVA/2012/B5103/1513
National Project Technical Director (Mongolia), application period: 2012 November 30 - 2013 January 27
Feed ItemTugnuy-Sukhara sub-basin watershed management plan (Buryatia)
Feed ItemPresentation of the Toolkit "Baikal Box"
A presentation of the toolkit for primary and middle grade students “Baikal’s Little Treasure Chest” will be held on February 21 at the Music and Humanities High School.
Feed ItemKhilok sub-basin watershed management plan (Zabaikalsky Krai)
Feed ItemVA/2013/B5002/2006
Consultant for cattle mortuary design, application period: 2013 March 06 - 2013 March 13
Feed ItemBiodiversity compatible recreational tourism plan for Zabaikalsky National Park
Feed ItemWorld Water Day 2013 International Year of Water Cooperation
Feed ItemBiodiversity conservation standards and biodiversity management objectives for tourism and mining
Feed ItemRound Table of the State Duma Committee on Natural Resources, Environment and Ecology
«Harmonization of legislation on the protection of Lake Baikal in the federal program "Protection of Lake Baikal and the socio-economic development of the Baikal natural territory for the years 2012-2020»
Feed ItemOptions for enhancing of transboundary cooperation
Feed ItemWorkshop of the Baikal territory municipalities and protected areas
Feed ItemVA/2013/B5002/2239
Training Expert in POPs/PTSs (Mongolia), application period: 2013 April 25 - 2013 May 26
Feed ItemTDA regional technical workshop
Feed ItemSecond Regional Steering Committee Meeting
Feed ItemVA/2013/B5002/2408
Consultant to develop recommendations on environmental investments on active concerns to reduce pollution discharge, application period: 2013 May 23 - 2013 May 30
Feed ItemVA/2013/B5002/2427
Senior Law Expert, application period: 2013 May 24 - 2013 May 31
Feed ItemMongolia Named as Global Host of World Environment Day 2013
Feed ItemInternational conference "Rivers of Siberia and Far East"
Feed ItemInternational conference "Baikal strategic resource of the planet"
Feed ItemInternational forum «Eco-tourism on Lake Baikal +20»
Feed ItemDuma hearings on "Transboundary water issues"
Feed ItemCattle mortuary construction in Kurumkansky district
Feed ItemContest "Best in tourism proffecison"
Feed ItemEco-trail Yangima
Feed ItemShoreline clean-up campaigns in Russia
Feed ItemVA/2013/B5002/3967
Consultant on Pollution Hotspot Methodology development, application period: 2013 September 20 - 2013 September 27
Feed ItemRecommendations for tenderers
Feed ItemPublications
Feed ItemThe GEF IW:Learn Web Award competition
Feed ItemPOPs study guide and trainings
Training for rising awareness and improvement in management of stakeholders in Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS) and Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs)
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-065 (IWC-78317) “Extension of eco-trail “Cedar Alley” and enhancement of biodiversity compatible comprehensive botanical tour for it in the Baikal State Nature Biosphere Reserve, Tankhoi, Buryatiya, Russia"
Feed ItemEUROPARC Annual Conference 2013
Feed ItemThe documentary “BAIKAL WITHOUT BOUNDARIES”
Festival version
Feed ItemAddressing impacts of climate change on Tunisian Kerkennah Islands
Recent studies indicate that a 50 cm rise in sea-level would immerse 30% of the Islands
Feed ItemWWF Study Cites Challenges Facing Taytay’s Fishing Industry
Taytay’s thriving Live Reef Fish Trade (LRFT) continues to be besieged by overfishing, lack of proper management practices, and the lack of supporting policies to address these concerns, according to a case study from the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). Taytay in Palawan is one of the biggest municipalities...
Feed ItemThe documentary “BAIKAL WITHOUT BOUNDARIES”
The IWC7 Festival Version version of the documentary “Baikal Without Boundaries” has been made. This scientific documentary is not only about Lake Baikal itself but it is also about the main basin rivers bringing clear and limpid waters to the lake. The Baikal Basin contains a lot of architectural and natural landmarks, as well as rare scientific artifacts. The major goal of this documentary is to make the thought clear to everyone that it is extremely important to preserve the Baikal Basin as a unique natural, ecological and sociocultural phenomenon.
Feed ItemOptions for enhancing of transboundary cooperation
Feed ItemFiji Moves Toward Systematic Coastal Planning
The Republic of Fiji will soon put in place its first comprehensive coastal resource planning system to address some of the country’s challenges to sustainable coastal development. Most government departments in Fiji currently lack the capacity to utilize coastal and marine assets while simultaneously protecting them from degradation. Although the...
Feed ItemSEAFDEC convenes Special Council Meeting in Bangkok, Thailand
SEAFDEC convened the Special Meeting of the Council in Bangkok, Thailand on 3-4 October 2013 to discuss important management issues in order to improve the operations of the Center, particularly on the recommendations of the Third SEAFDEC Review, the Plans of Operation of SEAFDEC Departments and Secretariat, as well as other management issues. The Meeting ... The post SEAFDEC convenes Special Council Meeting in Bangkok, Thailand appeared first on SEAFDEC-Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center .
Feed ItemPhilippine Scientist Grows Coral Reefs from Broken Coral Fragments
Guillermo Delos Reyes has been fishing all his life in the waters off Batangas. Three decades ago, he could earn several thousands of pesos from fish scooped up in his nets on an overnight trip. These days, he stays out at sea for hours and returns home with a small...
Feed ItemWorkshop to Introduce environmentally sound management of PCBs in Bosnia Herzegovina
The workshop aimed at introducing the environmentally sound management of PCBs to local experts, and training them on the sampling and analysis of PCBs by using the semi-mobile analyzer L2000DX.
Feed ItemCoastal and Marine Programs Seek to Rehabilitate Pacific Coral Reefs
Countries in the Pacific will be implementing new policies and programs on coastal and marine conservation, including the rehabilitation of coral reefs in the region. Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Timor-Leste are part of the Coral Triangle and these policies and programs are critical in the management of...
Feed ItemMFIs Visit PPP Model of Coastal, Marine Resources Conservation
The Multilateral Financial Institutions (MFI) Working Group on Environment observed on 18–19 October three Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) established through a public–private partnership (PPP) in the province of Batangas in the Philippines. Representatives from the Asian Development Bank, the World Bank, International Finance Corporation, European Investment Bank, Commerce and Economic...
Feed ItemCTI-SEA Philippines Annual Review Mission, Philippines
(ACTIVITY: 28 October) CTI-SEA Philippines Annual Review Mission, Philippines. Coral Triangle Initiative Southeast Asia Annual review mission with Philippines Project Management Unit. Headed by Raul Roldan, Deputy Team Leader. Contact roldanrg@yahoo.com.
Feed ItemInternational Waters Conference, Bridgetown, Barbados
(CONFERENCE: 26-31 October) International Waters Conference, Bridgetown, Barbados. The 7th Global Environment Facility (GEF) Biennial International Waters Conference (IWC7) will aim to to facilitate cross-sectoral and portfolio-wide learning and experience sharing. The conference seeks to solicit advice from the existing GEF IW portfolio on burning issues, and to assist in...
Feed ItemCTI-SEA Indonesia Annual Review Mission, Indonesia
(ACTIVITY: 22-25 October) CTI-SEA Indonesia Annual Review Mission, Indonesia. Coral Triangle Initiative Southeast Asia Annual review mission with Indonesia Project Management Unit. Headed by Dr. Daniel Monintja, Deputy Team Leader. Contact danipb41@yahoo.com.
Feed ItemThe Triangle – 2013 Official Selection of SDUFEX Undersea Film Exhibition
Watch amazing underwater footage from Indonesia and the Philippines in Dustin Adamson’s “The Triangle,” a 2013 official selection of the San Diego Undersea Film Exhibition.
Feed Item14th SEAFDEC Information Staff Program (ISP) Meeting
The Fourteenth Meeting of SEAFDEC Information Staff Program, 30 October – 1 November 2013, Thailand Please find the documents below. (click to download) File Document Name Updated Information Paper INF01 Information Notes for Participants 24 Oct INF02 Provisional Prospectus 24 Oct INF03 List of Documents 24 Oct INF04 List of Participants  24 Oct Working Paper ... The post 14th SEAFDEC Information Staff Program (ISP) Meeting appeared first on SEAFDEC-Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center .
Feed ItemEnvironmental flows and the sausage machine
By James Dalton of IUCN’s Water Programme, attending World Water Week. This year’s annual World Water Week was a challenge of schedules. With more to say and with us involved in many sessions we tag-teamed presentations, speaking slots, panels and facilitation. The week focussed on Water Cooperation – Building Partnerships, and our BRIDGE project was […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Environmental flows and the sausage machine appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemIs net positive feasible when it comes to water?
It is much more complicated to manage water than carbon and deserves more effort than simply transferring the same metrics, says James Dalton of IUCN’s Water Programme writing for Guardian Professional. New business terms and trends come and go. Net positive impact (NPI) is one of these engaging concepts. It’s a relatively simple idea – business impacts on […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Is net positive feasible when it comes to water? appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemA first-hand view of the gap between global goals and reality on the ground
By Milika Sobey of IUCN’s Oceania Office. Last week, I visited Manaoba Island, located in Malaita Province. This was my first visit to rural Solomon Islands since 1988 when I went on a two-week trip to the Western Province to do research in Marovo Lagoon. Little has changed in terms of living standards and access […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post A first-hand view of the gap between global goals and reality on the ground appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemAll hands to the pump – lessons and solutions on water management from Bogotà
By Claire Warmenbol of IUCN’s Water Programme. As part of the ‘Nexus Dialogue on Water Infrastructure Solutions’, I recently attended a workshop in Bogotà, Colombia – the second in a series of three regional workshops, jointly organised by IUCN and the International Water Association. Before I share some thoughts on this event, I should quickly […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post All hands to the pump – lessons and solutions on water management from Bogotà appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemIn The Colorado Delta, A <br />Little Water Goes A Long Way
This Week is World Water Week and a coalition spanning the US-Mexico border is a perfect example of this year's theme-water cooperation. The group is thinking outside the box to restore the Colorado River delta - using water rights markets, recaptured wastewater, and a groundbreaking new federal deal-that's breathing new life into an ecosystem widely assumed to be gone forever.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: With Water Energy Nexus, It's Lead Or Be Led
Ecosystem Marketplace is at the One Water Leadership Summit in Los Angeles this week where everyone is thinking about the water-energy nexus. Meanwhile, Australia's newly elected government reduces funds for Murray-Darling buybacks and Coca-Coca enters into a partnership with the USDA to protect US National Forests.
Feed ItemRestoration vs. Renewable Energy: Amateurism Doesn’t Pay
Good land stewardship and energy efficiency both support our economy, but governments don’t pay nearly as much attention to the economic benefits of investment in environmental restoration as they do to investments in energy efficiency. Damon Hess of Sitka Technology argues that they should.
Feed ItemJulio Tresierra: Transforming Lives <br />With Investments In Watershed Services
A Peruvian sociologist dedicated to poverty alleviation has helped implement a version of payments for watershed services projects in impoverished nations like Guatemala, Peru and Indonesia with the help of WWF. The initiatives have led to a host of benefits for the local populations and ecosystems and now have the Chinese government as well as other nations interested in the model.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: A Good Month For Green Infrastructure
The past month saw movement in the green infrastructure space with an assessment on green infrastructure valuation tools and a $50 million fund slated to implement natural infrastructure upgrades in Chicago. Also this month, two papers from Forest Trends offering thoughts on the social impact assessment of investments in watershed services programs.
Feed ItemNew Guidance To Protect America's Water And Reduce Costs With Natural Infrastructure
Feed ItemThe Siren’s Call of Urban Stormwater
Feed ItemMapping aquifers: Aerial technology used to find drinking water
Feed ItemTrading program could have positive affect on rivers
Feed ItemB.C. Water Act To Regulate Groundwater, Force Nestle To Pay
Feed ItemBusiness of Water summit stirs economic support for water conservation
Feed ItemWater management for irrigation
Feed ItemPA Municipal Authorities Assn. Joins Chesapeake Bay Foundation In Opposing SB 994
Feed ItemFood eco-labelling – green credentials or green-mail?
Feed ItemPennsylvania Governor Corbett Announces $53 Million Investment in Water Infrastructure Projects in 15 Counties
Feed ItemChina’s Cleaner-Air Plan Puts Water Supplies at Risk: WRI
Feed ItemSainsbury’s Opens ‘Water Neutral’ Store
Feed ItemExpert: Rising water demand will force more "holistic" approach
Feed ItemNew Belgium pledges $10K to water initiative
Feed ItemWater, energy and food nexus in the Arab world
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-062 "Biodiversity compatible tourism plan with a route to the seasonal haul for the Baikal seal on the island Tonkii. (Ushkanyi Islands), Buryatia, Russia", application period: 05 July 2013 - 25 July 2013
Feed ItemRFQ_GPSO_2013-063 "Model sub-basin Essential Fish Habitat in Russia", application period: 12 July 2013 - 01 August 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-064 “Pilot construction of cattle mortuary in Barguzinsky district, Buryatia, The Russian Federation”; application period: 16 August 2013 - 26 August 2013
Feed ItemEnvironment and Sustainable Development in Mongolian Plateau and Surrounding Regions
Feed ItemTraining workshop for stakeholders
’’Awareness rising and management improvement in the field of environmental problems of Lake Baikal Basin and the role of green economy in their solving’’
Feed ItemHigh-Level International Conference on Water Cooperation
Feed Item"Baikal dialogue" Forum
Feed ItemNational Workshop “Selenge – A River without Borders”
Feed ItemIntergovernmental Forum on Live Reef Food Fish Trade
SEAFDEC co-organized with the Coral Triangle Initiative-Coral Reefs, Fisheries and Food Security (CTI-CFF), the Intergovernmental Forum on Live Reef Food Fish Trade (LRFFT) from 31 January to 1 February 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. The forum brought together senior officials and heads of fisheries agencies of the relevant countries to share and synergise strategies and identify ... The post Intergovernmental Forum on Live Reef Food Fish Trade appeared first on SEAFDEC-Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center .
Feed ItemGWP Presents the New and Improved IWRM ToolBox
Thirteen years after it was first launched, GWP’s online database  IWRM ToolBox  gets a facelift. It is not the first time a change is made, but it is the most radical. The new version, now integrated with the main GWP website,  has more features and is easier to navigate.
Feed ItemHigh-Level International Conference on Water Cooperation
21 August 2013, Dushanbe, Tajikistan. “Fostering international cooperation through joint water...
Feed ItemAnnual Lecture: ”Adaptation issues affect everyone”
International water cooperation is essential. This was one of the key messages that Ambassador Robert F. Van Lierop delivered in his keynote speech at the GWP Consulting Partners Meeting in Stockholm. He made it clear that climate adaptation issues affect the entire world.
Feed ItemGWP and OECD Launch Global Dialogue Project
Global Water Partnership and the OECD have launched a joint project to establish a Global Dialogue on Water Security and Sustainable Growth. The major output of the cooperation will be a milestone report to be presented at the World Water Forum in 2015 in South Korea.
Feed ItemSpecial Council Meeting
Special Council Meeting, 3-4 October 2013, Bangkok, Thailand Please find Meeting Documents below; (Click to Download) File Document Name Updated Information Paper INF01 Information Note for Participants INF02 List of Documents INF03 List of Participants Working Paper  WP01 Agenda WP01a Annotated Agenda WP01b Agenda and Timetable WP02 The Financial Situation of SEAFDEC in 2003-2012 WP03 ... The post Special Council Meeting appeared first on SEAFDEC-Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center .
Feed ItemAfrica’s farmers get plugged in to water
New online tool helps smallholder water management The majority of farmers in Africa rely on rainwater for to produce their crops but suffer from high evaporation, variable and uneven distribution of rainfall, prolonged dry spells and occasional flooding. Climate change is making variable rainfall even less predictable in some areas.     But now Africa’s […]
Feed ItemIn the Caribbean, UNDP providing vital entrepreneurial skills for youth
A youth development project will assist Caribbean states and citizens reduce current unemployment figures, with UNDP support.
Feed ItemGWP and OECD Launch Global Dialogue Project
Global Water Partnership and the OECD have launched a joint project to establish a Global Dialogue on Water Security and Sustainable Growth. The major output of the cooperation will be a milestone report to be presented at the World Water Forum in 2015 in South Korea.
Feed ItemNegotiations enter final straight for major high-level commitments for the Baltic Sea - PRESS RELEASE
The members of the Baltic Sea Marine Environment Protection Commission (HELCOM), formed by the nine coastal countries and the EU, have today started their 42nd Heads of Delegation Meeting particularly focusing on the precise contents of the 2013 Ministerial Declaration, set to be adopted in exactly one month. The Declaration will cover a wide selection of topics covering biodiversity and ecosystem services, eutrophication, hazardous substances, shipping, preparedness and response to pollution at sea, along with monitoring, assessment and marine knowledge.
Feed ItemNational efforts, regional solidarity honoured as FFA receives Pacific Ocean Commissioner’s Award 2013
FFA HQ, Honiara, SOLOMON ISLANDS.—The honour of receiving the 2013 Pacific Ocean Commissioners Award has been described as a moment of recognition for   regional solidarity by the Forum Fisheries Director General, James Movick. News of the award came during a keynote statement at an ‘Oceanscape’ event last night in the wings of the current 44th Pacific Forum Leaders meeting this week in Majuro, Republic of the Marshall Islands.
Feed ItemCertification of Lobster fishery in Lamu County underway
The State Department of Fisheries (SDF) through support from Kenya Coastal Development Project (KCDP) is working on certification of the lobster fishery in Lamu County to give it a competitive edge in the world market. KCDP is a World Bank funded initiative implemented by Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI) in collaboration with SDF and five other partner agencies.
Feed ItemFFA FISHERIES TRADE NEWS Volume 6: Issue 4 July-August 2013
FFA FISHERIES TRADE NEWS  Volume 6: Issue 4   July-August 2013 By Liam Campling and Elizabeth Havice[1] CONTENTS Preferential Trade Agreements Philippines tuna industry set to gain from EU GSP reform  Fisheries Regulation EU makes first use of sustainable fisheries trade sanctions  OPRT pushes for reduction in WCPO fishing capacity Fisheries Development Greenpeace report promotes small-scale tuna fisheries in Pacific islands  China expands distant water fisheries  EU fishery strategy for the Pacific proposed ...
Feed ItemPacific Fisheries Observers help crack down on illegal tuna fishing
SPC-FFA Joint Media Release --Evidence given by Pacific Island fisheries observers has helped secure judgements against the owners, operators and fishing masters of six tuna purse seiners, with heavy fines imposed – over USD 1.5 million in total. All of the boats had been accused of fishing on fish aggregating devices (FADs) during the FAD ban in 2009, a measure put in place across the region to reduce catches of small bigeye ...
Feed ItemParaguay extends Zero Deforestation Law to 2018
Asunción, Paraguay: The Paraguayan government has extended the "Zero Deforestation Law" for a further five years, resulting in an important conservation win for this highly threatened eco-region. The Land Conversion Moratorium for the Atlantic Forest of Paraguay, also known as the "Zero Deforestation Law" was enacted in 2004 and dramatically slowed the country's deforestation rate by prohibiting the transformation and conversion of forested areas in Paraguay's eastern region.
Feed ItemWhy Disney, BP And Rio Tinto <br />Are Exploring Ecosystem Services
Sissel Waage of BSR (Business of Social Responsibility) discusses reasons why ecosystem services thinking is on the rise as the number of governments investing in ecosystem services and companies incorporating their environmental impacts into existing business models continue to grow.
Feed ItemEcosystem Services Front And Center As Lawsuit Seeks Restitution For Destroying Louisiana Wetlands
One of the agencies responsible for flood control in the US state of Louisiana is suing more than 100 oil and gas companies for damages caused by degraded coastal lands. Even if the suit fails, it could push the concept of ecosystem services into the mainstream.
Feed ItemBuilding A More Resilient Gulf
Tierra Resources’ new carbon methodology could help close the financing gap for wetlands restorations projects on the Louisiana Gulf Coast, offering an extra push for private landowners. Entergy, the major utility in the region, sees more than one reason to be involved.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: <br />Oil And Gas Sued For Climate <br />Damage To Wetlands In The Gulf
Forest Trends' Water Initiative will preview their work on blending green and grey infrastructure at World Water Week later this month. In the meantime, the Ohio River Basin water quality trading program is moving forward on pilot trades and an agency responsible for flood control in Louisiana is suing over 100 oil and gas companies for coastal land degradation in a groundbreaking new lawsuit.  
Feed ItemEntergy Seeks To Lead <br />On Climate Risk Mitigation
Most of Louisiana’s oil and gas companies are on the defensive after a state entity sued nearly 100 of them for damages they caused by destroying protective wetlands. A handful of companies, however, have identified wetland restoration as a major goal – for their protection and the protection of the state. Here’s a look at one of the biggest.
Feed ItemLouisiana Wetlands: Why We All Need Them, And Why Oil Companies Aren't The Only Ones On The Hot Seat
The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority – East (SLFPAE) has pursued legal action against 97 oil and gas companies for damages to Louisiana's coast. In an interview with Harry Shearer, SLFPAE vice president John Barry offers big-picture insight into the factors degrading the coast and driving the suit.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: Creative Cooperation
This week is World Water Week in Stockholm with this year's theme focusing on water cooperation and building partnerships. Seminars, interviews and other features will be available online. Meanwhile, forest fires in the US west are bringing water-energy-food nexus thinking to the fore, with the region's energy and water supplies vulnerable to the fires and overall climate risk.  
Feed ItemPennsylvania's Nutrient Trading Bill Pledges To Reduce Cost And Improve Results, But Will It Work?
Two organizations with a shared interest in improving the Chesapeake Bay watershed are divided over a draft nutrient trading bill in Pennsylvania, with supporters foreseeing a slash in the cost of Bay cleanup and opponents seeing technology that isn't cost-competitive or compliant with state and federal regulations. 
Feed ItemUS, Sweden unveil $25 mln clean water technology grant
Feed ItemNew regulations drive discussion at Iowa Farm Bureau conference
Feed ItemNew framework aims to help guide water-saving investments
Feed ItemWater conference opens in Stockholm with wise supply plea
Feed ItemArizona Irrigators Share Water with Desert River
Feed ItemColombia: Ecosystem services take a central role in disaster risk management
Feed ItemMajority of China’s Proposed Coal-Fired Power Plants Located in Water-Stressed Regions
Feed ItemUN agency says 2.2 mln Zimbabweans face food shortages
Feed ItemThe global water crisis – why water politics matter for business security
Feed ItemOECD urges government action over ‘water stress’
Feed ItemShould offsets fund the Coalition’s reef plan?
Feed ItemWildfires and Climate Change
Feed ItemWater footprinting: will it help companies manage a scarce resource?
Feed ItemAt the Farm and the Brewery, MillerCoors Gets More Beer to the Barrel with Water Efficiency
Feed ItemChina's clean-water program benefits people and the environment, Stanford research shows
Feed ItemTsolum River Partnership Reduces Copper Contamination and Brings Salmon Back
Feed ItemYellow river : The PRC’s extensive water management framework extends vertically and horizontally from the central government to its townships and villages
The Yellow River – the second-longest river in the People’s Republic of China and one of the ten longest rivers in the world – plays an important role in the national economy.
Feed ItemDavao river basin : Specially appointed authorities have been set up in major river basins to control water pollution
The Davao basin covers eight sub-basins and is the main source of water for Davao City in southern Philippines. The basin supports a rich range of resources and land uses, including urban areas, agricultural land, wetlands, mangroves, tree plantations and natural upland forests. It is also a major source of raw materials for food, medicine and cosmetics, and plays a crucial role in the economy of the country as a whole.
Feed ItemRed river : Policy and institutional changes in Viet Nam are responding to the need to modernize river basin management
The Red River Basin is a transboundary river basin spanning parts of the People’s Republic of China, Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Viet Nam. In Viet Nam, the basin encompasses 26 provinces including the capital city, Ha Noi, with a combined population of about 28 million people.
Feed ItemChao Lake :The PRC’s extensive water management framework extends vertically and horizontally from the central government to its townships and villages
Chao Lake, the fifth largest in the People’s Republic of China, struggled to overcome one of the most serious eutrophication problems in the country caused by decades of pollution spurred by economic growth pressures.
Feed ItemPublic awareness about the Yarra River was heightened through a long-term media campaign titled “Give the Yarra a go.”
The Yarra basin lies in a drought-prone region of the southern state of Victoria. The state capital Melbourne is positioned at the estuary of the Yarra River, from which it obtains 70% of its water needs.
Feed Item4Ps rivers : Cambodia’s Water Law supports strategic investments in developing water resources, and promotes transparent, accountable and participatory water management
The 4Ps River basin consists of four sub-basins of the Mekong River — the Prek Preah, Prek Krieng, Prek Kampi and Prek Te. Located in eastern Cambodia, the basin is still mostly covered by forests. About 1% of the area is cultivated, and a quarter of this is irrigated. Poverty is still widespread and local people are vulnerable to floods and drought.
Feed ItemYom river : Thailand’s inclusive approach ensures effective and innovative basin management through stakeholder participation
Plans to build a dam on the Yom River of Thailand have caused disputes between water users and communities living in the basin. In 2008, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of Thailand, with support from the Asian Development Bank, launched a collaborative integrated water resources management initiative that focused on participatory processes for the management of the Yom River Basin.
Feed ItemYoshino River : Japan’s water policies have been revised and adapted over the past 60 years in response to changing needs
The Yoshino River flows through Shikoku Island in southeastern Japan. The Yoshino River Basin Management Plan of 1966 was one of the first such efforts in Asia and the Pacific region. It was formulated through consultations held with local stakeholders, including riparian residents in Tokushima on the east of Shikoku Island, upstream residents of Kochi on its southern coast, and transboundary water users in Ehime and Kagawa on its northern side.
Feed ItemBrantas River Basin : A monitoring system has been established where stakeholder reporting, water quality monitoring and routine inspection are carried out
The Brantas basin in East Java supplies water to about 16 million users, but suffers from poor water quality due to rapid population growth and industrialization.
Feed ItemThe Water Council of Bengawan Solo was set up to improve coordination and management
The Bengawan Solo basin is the largest on the island of Java. Administratively it is shared by two provinces, Central and East Java, and is jointly managed by Jasa Tirta Public Corporation I (PJT I) and Balai Besar Wilayah Sungai Bengawan Solo (BBWS-BS).
Feed ItemWorld Bank Water Partnership Program Releases Progress Report
27 Aug 2013 - 10:22 by OOSKAnews Correspondent WASHINGTON, DC, United States The World Bank last week released a progress report on the first phase of its Water Partnership Program (WPP), a trust fund supported by the governments of the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Denmark that aims to bring “the best knowledge available to help countries solve their uniquely complex water challenges.” Access Climate Corporate Risk Development Aid Disasters Ecosystems Energy ...
Feed ItemSurvey Finds Groundwater Contamination in All Major Indian Cities
28 Aug 2013 - 10:12 by OOSKAnews Correspondent NEW DELHI, India Almost all major cities in India, including New Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata and Chennai, have poor quality groundwater, leaving residents susceptible to a host of diseases, according to a water audit carried out by Indian water purification system maker Eureka Forbes and German market research organization GfK Group.
Feed ItemClimate change adaptation in practice
By Dr James Dalton, Coordinator, Global Initiatives, IUCN Water Programme. ‘Nam bilong me James Dalton’ – I said as we all did introductions in Pidgin at the beginning of the stakeholder consultation meeting in Gizo, the capital of the Western Province of the Solomon Islands.  We continued introductions around the table and I handed over […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Climate change adaptation in practice appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemKayaks to Korea – locally-managed marine areas at the 2012 IUCN World Conservation Congress
By Brian Jones, Conservation Coordinator, Blue Ventures Conservation, an IUCN Member It’s no secret that fisheries around the globe are in trouble, with the Food and Agriculture Organization recently reporting that over half of the world’s fisheries are “fully exploited” and another third are either “over-exploited”, “depleted” or “recovering from depletion”. The challenge of managing […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Kayaks to Korea – locally-managed marine areas at the 2012 IUCN World Conservation Congress appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemDo we need more data, or just more of turning knowledge into action?
By Dr James Dalton, Coordinator, Global Initiatives, IUCN Water Programme. Well, it’s an easy question to answer – we need both. But what sort of blend do we need? Over the last few weeks I have been surprised and, I’ll admit, a little exasperated over some things – maybe it’s the heat and the noise in […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Do we need more data, or just more of turning knowledge into action? appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemSharing learning on water diplomacy at World Water Week
By Rebecca Welling of IUCN’s Water Programme attending World Water Week in Stockholm. When you think about water diplomacy, what is the first thing that comes to mind? Law? Transboundary conflict? States and Ministers agreeing on pertinent issues? For me, from a water management perspective, it was about legal frameworks, international law and States coming together to […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Sharing learning on water diplomacy at World Water Week appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemThe realities of the Nexus
By Claire Warmenbol of IUCN’s Global Water Programme. I will start this post with a confession. When I recently told my mother I was flying to Nairobi for a workshop on the Nexus Dialogue, I struggled to explain to her, in a jargon-free way, what this project is all about. The truth was, the Nexus, […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post The realities of the Nexus appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemHydropower back on the agenda
By Dr James Dalton, Coordinator, Global Initiatives, IUCN Water Programme. I just came back from the International Hydropower Association (IHA) Congress in Kuching – the capital of the Malaysian State of Sarawak on Borneo. We wanted to see what progress had been made in the application of the Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Protocol (HSAP) following its […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry... The post Hydropower back on the agenda appeared first on IUCN International .
Feed ItemEnvironmental flows Trial -- with a special focus on the Onkaparinga River
Feed ItemSource of Amur
Feed ItemJal Dharo Jal Bharo : Preserve Water Reserve Water (West Bengal)
Feed ItemGoodbye to the baiji, the Yangtze River dolphin (Natural History Museum)
Feed ItemWater powered trade-offs in the Indus River Basin ( CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE))
Follow this link : The Indus rises on the Tibetan plateau in the Himalayas and runs down through Pakistan to the Arabian Sea. Along its way it feeds the largest connected irrigation system in the world, covering more than 18 million hectares of farmland. It also powers four major hydropower facilities, upstream of the farming areas. While other countries often have mixed priorities for their water, Pakistan has always been clear. The Indus is for irrigation. Hydropower is a secondary concern...
Feed ItemYavapai County Supervisor Chip Davis Interview on the Verde River
Click on "read more" to watch part 2, 3 and 4
Feed ItemArizona's Bill Williams River (Nature Conservancy)
Feed ItemSave the Confluence (Little Colorado)...
Feed ItemAlaska: Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge
Feed ItemCooperation and joint management of shared basins and water resources are crucial to socioeconomic development in Central Asia
The Chu and Talas rivers, shared by Kazakhstan and The Kyrgyz Republic, support a combined population of more than 1.6 million, and are crucial sources of water for agriculture, aquaculture, power generation, industry and domestic consumption in both countries.
Feed ItemA wetland once leased to private parties now belongs to the community
Lying in northeast Bangladesh, the Tanguar Haor wetland forms part of the wetland and floodplain complex of the Surma and Kushiyara river basins. About half of Tanguar Haor’s area comprises waterbodies and almost a third cropland. The wetland provides habitats for many different species of waterbirds and fish.
Feed ItemPartnerships between communities, the government, and civil society organizations can be effective in managing water resources
The basin of the Gagas River, a fragile spring-fed river in northern India, has seen major changes over the past few decades. Dwindling tree cover has led to a marked reduction in water flows. River fish no longer form part of the local diet, and agricultural production has declined.
Feed ItemSingapore’s success in managing its water efficiently is evident in the domestic reduction in water consumption
By the second half of the 20th century, rapid industrialization and urbanization had severely degraded water quality in the Kallang Basin. The Kallang River was devoid of aquatic life and considered ecologically dead.
Feed ItemRiver basin management strategies in Malaysia are taking account of important habitats for endangered plant and animal species
The Lower Kinabatangan region is rich in biodiversity, with waterlogged and dry forests, saline and freshwater swamps, and limestone forests. It has around 1,000 plant species and 50 mammal species, including primates, many endemic to the region. The Kinabatangan River is also the source of water for Sandakan, the second-largest city in Sabah, where oil palm cultivation is its main economic activity.
Feed ItemPolicy and institutional changes in Viet Nam are responding to the need to modernize river basin management
The lower part of the Dong Nai River supplies water to Ho Chi Minh City and Dong Nai and Binh Duong provinces and feeds a hydropower plant in the Tri An reservoir, but has been polluted by wastewater runoff from agriculture, aquaculture, industry and built-up areas (Ha et al. 2008).
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Vanuatu
Sustainable Management of the Sarakata Watershed 30 th  April 2013: Vanuatu’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Sustainable Management of the Sarakata Watershed” has strengthened arrangements for improved watershed management and community engagement. The project is also successfully testing various measures to reduce stress on the Sarakata watershed. Key project results include: establishment of the Sarakata Basin Integrated Flood Management Plan; establishment of Water Protected Zones; increase in community engagement with national Government on water issues; and successful trials of sustainable forest and land management practices with landowners. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access Vanuatu’s ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Tuvalu
Integrated Sustainable Wastewater Management (EcoSan) for Tuvalu 6 th  May 2013: Tuvalu’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Integrated Sustainable Wastewater Management (EcoSan) for Tuvalu” has strengthened arrangements for improved wastewater management and mainstreamed IWRM into National Policy. The project has also successfully shared sanitation solutions with other Pacific countries. Key project results include: successful design and replication of sanitation solutions; successful engagement of Tuvaluan communities and government; development of a National IWRM Policy and Indicator Framework; reduction in sewage pollution across Funafuti and a reduction in freshwater use for sanitation uses. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access Tuvalu’s ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in FSM
Ridge to Reef: Protecting Water Quality from Source to Sea 13 th  May 2013: FSM’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Ridge to Reef: Protecting Water Quality from Source to Sea” has strengthened national coordination in the water and sanitation sector and has enhanced community collaboration to improve water resource management. Key project results include: a Joint Resolution of President and State Governors endorsing the first framework National Water and Sanitation Policy; establishment and operation of a National Task Force including State representation; protection and rehabilitation of riparian zone of the main water supply in Nett Watershed; sustainable forest and land management practices established and trialled with landowner; and strengthening of routine water monitoring. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access FSM’s ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Tonga
Improvement and Sustainable Management of Neiafu, Vava’u’s Groundwater Resource 20 th  May 2013: Tonga’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Improvement and Sustainable Management of Neiafu, Vava’u’s Groundwater Resource” has strengthened arrangements for improved watershed management and community engagement. The project is also successfully testing various measures to reduce stress on the Neiafu aquifer. Key project results include: formation of the Neiafu Aquifer Management Committee; 60% increase in community engagement with national Government on water issues; assessment of sustainable yields from Neiafu Aquifer; and installation of 11 trial sanitation systems to reduce groundwater contamination. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access Tonga’s ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in SI
Managing Honiara City Water Supply and Reducing Pollution via IWRM 27 th  May 2013: Solomon Islands’ GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Managing Honiara City Water Supply and Reducing Pollution via IWRM” has made great progress in strengthening stakeholder engagement for water resource management and securing access to safe drinking water. Key project results include: Catchment Management Plans for Kovi & Kongulai; established IWRM Project Steering Committee; Water Use Efficiency and Demand Management in Honiara pilot zone; capacity training for SIWA’s Leakage Detection team; stress reduction measures such as consistent water sampling and increased water hours at Mbokonavera. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access Solomon Islands ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-058 “Pilot construction of cattle mortuary in Kurumkansky district, Buryatia, The Russian Federation”, application period: 13 May 2013 - 25 May 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-059 «Clean up the riparian zone of Lake Hovsgol and expansion of water sanitation zone in the degraded shorelines», application period: 23 May 2013 - 12 June 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013_060 «The joint project with OECD for Selenga subbasin - Evaluation of effectiveness in IWRM», application period: 24 May 2013 - 12 June 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-061 (Round table and training for stakeholders), application period: 07 June 2013 - 26 June 2013
“Holding of round table “development of ecological tourism: initiatives and partnership of business, society and state” within the scope of international Forum “EcoTourism on Baikal +20” on July 13, 2013 in Turka (tourist zone “Baikalskaya gavanj”), Buryatia, Russia” and “Training for stakeholders’’ awareness rising and management improvement in the field of environmental problems of Lake Baikal Basin and the role of green economy in their solving".
Feed ItemWED IN MONGOLIA
Feed ItemAttending the design work of database management system of Lake Tanganyika Monitoring
Visiting Scholar Program for MOST-UNEP Joint Project of Water Quality and Ecosystem Monitoring and Demonstration of New Waste Water Treatment
Feed ItemPRESS RELEASE: PARTNER STATES PREPARE PLAN TO IMPROVE FOREST GOVERNANCE AND TRADE IN EAST AFRICA
Nairobi, KENYA, 28 th May 2013: Experts from the East African Community partner states are meeting to prepare an elaborate action plan to improve Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade in the region.
Feed ItemPRESS RELEASE: LAKE VICTORIA BASIN COMMISSION TO HOST DONORS’ CONFERENCE IN ENTEBBE, UGANDA
Kisumu, KENYA, 13 th June 2013: The Lake Victoria Basin Commission, with support from the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA), has organised the 3 rd Lake Victoria Basin Donors’ Conference to be held from 17 th – 18 th June 2013 at Protea Hotel, Entebbe, Uganda. The Conference is meant to strengthen relationships and solidify plans with development partners in the implementation of the Lake Victoria Basin Commission’s Strategic Plan (2011-2016).
Feed ItemPRESS RELEASE: DONORS PLEDGE NEW SUPPORT FOR LAKE VICTORIA BASIN PROJECTS
Entebbe, UGANDA, 18 th June 2013: Regional and International Development Partners have pledged new support to fund the implementation of projects and programmes for the Lake Victoria Basin. The commitment was made during the two-day 3 rd Lake Victoria Basin Donors’ Conference, hosted by the Lake Victoria Basin Commission (LVBC) at Protrea Hotel in Entebbe, Uganda.
Feed ItemManagement and protection of coastal wetlands in the Mediterranean
Selected coastal wetlands were identified as case studies for mapping and more detailed presentation.
Feed ItemInternational conference "Rivers of Siberia and Far East"
Feed ItemWED IN MONGOLIA
Feed ItemDuma hearings on "Transboundary water issues"
Feed ItemInternational forum «Eco-tourism on Lake Baikal +20»
Feed ItemInternational conference "Baikal strategic resource of the planet"
Feed ItemIWMI at the heart of science
IWMI will go to the heart of science in July as we partner with Alliance Française Sri Lanka in the ‘Water at the heart of science’ exhibition to be held in Colombo from the 5th – 15th July. The science exhibition is organized in honor of the 2013 UN international Year of Water Cooperation and [...] The post IWMI at the heart of science appeared first on International Water Management Institute (IWMI) ...
Feed ItemThe Chumbe Island Coral Park in Zanzibar: A Model of Financially, Ecologically and Socially Sustainable Marine Park Management
Public communication, education and awareness-raising on the vulnerability of the marine and forest ecosystems and the importance of sustainable tourism are key pillars of CHICOP’s Environmental Education (EE) programs, which are regularly conducted on Chumbe Island and in Zanzibar.
Feed ItemUNIDO SUPPORTS THE WATER PROJECT IN CHIPANDE COMMUNITY, WATAMU DEMO SITE AREA
UNIDO through a partnership with the Government of Slovenia is working to support a water treatment project in Kilifi County, Kenya for the local community around the Chipande Primary School.
Feed ItemThe COAST Project Supports a Web-raising Training at the Watamu Demo Site
Web-raising is touted as a “best practice in enhancing the work of communities in the tourism industry”
Feed ItemTHE COAST PROJECT WORKING TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE COASTAL TOURISM THROUGH ECO-TOURISM: SHOWCASING ACTIVITIES, RESULTS AND LESSONS FROM KARTONG DEMO SITE IN THE GAMBIA
The COAST Project has been executing its activities aimed at demonstrating and supporting the adoption of Best Available Practices and Best Available Technologies (BAPs/BATs) approaches for sustainable coastal tourism that reduces the degradation of marine and coastal environments of trans-boundary significance.
Feed ItemMarking World Oceans Day, UN official urges coordinated action to reverse marine degradation
10 June 2013 – In observance of World Oceans Day, a senior United Nations official called on the international community to act in a concerted and coordinated manner to halt and reverse the damage to the planet’s open waters caused by human activity.
Feed ItemPRESS RELEASE: DONORS PLEDGE NEW SUPPORT FOR LAKE VICTORIA BASIN PROJECTS
Entebbe, UGANDA, 18 th June 2013: Regional and International Development Partners have pledged new support to fund the implementation of projects and programmes for the Lake Victoria Basin. The commitment was made during the two-day 3 rd Lake Victoria Basin Donors’ Conference, hosted by the Lake Victoria Basin Commission (LVBC) at Protrea Hotel in Entebbe, Uganda.
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-062 "Biodiversity compatible tourism plan with a route to the seasonal haul for the Baikal seal on the island Tonkii. (Ushkanyi Islands), Buryatia, Russia", application period: 05 July 2013 - 15 July 2013
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Tonga
Improvement and Sustainable Management of Neiafu, Vava’u’s Groundwater Resource 20 th  May 2013: Tonga’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Improvement and Sustainable Management of Neiafu, Vava’u’s Groundwater Resource” has strengthened arrangements for improved watershed management and community engagement. The project is also successfully testing various measures to reduce stress on the Neiafu aquifer.
Feed ItemFrom Kenya To China: The Spread Of Innovative Water Solutions
The 18th Katoomba meeting opens tomorrow in Beijing and with it a big opportunity for developing nations to share their experiences and gain valuable information from each other. Here, we look at the varying investments in watershed services programs in China, Peru and Ghana and how sharing ideas could benefit them all.
Feed ItemKatoomba XVIII Brings Water-Energy Nexus To Beijing
A global series of workshops were launched in Bonn, Germany, at the end of 2011 to deliver workable, scalable solutions to the global water challenge by the end of 2014. Though not officially one of those workshops, Katoomba XVIII will certainly draw on the lessons learned to date and contribute to the final outcome.
Feed ItemADB Water Boss Courts Private <br /> Buyers For Chinese Water Markets
On the opening day of the 18th Katoomba meeting in Beijing, the Asian Development Bank's (ADB) Water Resources Specialist, Zhang Qingfeng, offers an update on new trends in Chinese eco-compensation – including early steps towards encouraging private-sector investments in China’s natural infrastructure.
Feed ItemChina Aims For Scale, Scope, And Reach In Payments For Ecosystem Services
China’s eco-compensation programs are among the most comprehensive payments for ecosystem services on the planet, but delegates to the 18th Katoomba Meeting in Beijing say they must reach more people in more segments if they are to deliver lasting environmental benefits.
Feed ItemCan Katoomba XVIII Help <br /> The Miyun Reservoir?
More than 200 delegates to Katoomba XVIII from as far away as Peru, Switzerland, and Ghana will be spending the next three days in China's troubled Miun Reservoir. Their aim: to trade experiences, share lessons learned, and make recommendations to project developers at Miyun on designing and implementing effective watershed investments.
Feed ItemKatoomba XVIII Videoblog: Making PWS That Are Financially Viable, Environmentally Effective, And People Friendly
The Miyun Reservoir provides drinking water for more than 20 million people in one of the world's great metropolises, but its core challenges aren't much different than those of smaller waterbodies located in Ecuador, Peru, or the United State. We speak with Katoomba XVIII participats from those three countries.
Feed ItemCEQ's New Water Guidance Includes Ecosystem Services Approach
The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) just wrapped up the commenting period on the proposed new guidelines for evaluating Federal water resources investment. The Proposed Guidance is aiming for more balanced investments with an ecosystem services approach that will benefit both the economy and the environment.  
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: <br /> Dispatches From Katoomba
Ecosystem Marketplace returns from Katoomba XVIII in Beijing full of stories, podcasts and videoblogs on the meeting that focused on forests, water and people.  Upon returning, EM turns its attention to new White House guidance on water investments and an innovative wastewater treatment wetlands project in the Colorado Delta.  
Feed ItemThe Natural Capital Declaration Moves Forward With Implementation Phase
The Natural Capital Declaration (NCD) has been officially active for almost a year and is now ready to move into the second phase, which is the implementation of four commitments, focused on integrating natural capital into financial accounting, presented in the NCD Roadmap.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: Battle Lines Drawn Over Pennsylvania Nutrient Trading Bill
The likely winners of Australia's upcoming election pledge to cap instream buybacks and a Pennsylvania bill could promote unmarketable nutrient credits. Meanwhile, recommendations from Katoomba China have been recently released and a Chinese-language version of Watershed Connect launched.
Feed ItemHow The Supreme Court Just Undercut The Environmental Progress Obama Envisions
Feed ItemHigh court's blow to wetlands laws could boomerang, critics warn
Feed ItemCalifornia Cities to Reduce Water Imports From the Colorado River and Bay-Delta
Feed ItemUK Clothing Industry Signs Green Commitment
Feed ItemDrinking Water Infrastructure: Who Pays and How (And For What)
Feed ItemFAO Meeting Discusses Water and Food Security
Feed ItemEPA Delays Proposed Stormwater Rule Release, Now In Breach of Settlement Agreement
Feed ItemSoutheast Ind. Soil & Water Conservation districts break new ground in water quality trading
Feed ItemNational Roundtable on New Tools for Water Quality: Trading and Beyond
Feed ItemAs China's demand for coal soars, so does its water scarcity
Feed ItemWater For Fracking, In Context
Feed ItemThe saga of water security in Kenya
Feed ItemA Green Contagion: What Could Make Investing in Nature Catch On?
Feed ItemLonger-term El Nino warnings to help farmers adapt
Feed ItemQ+A: The impact of the deadly floods in India's Himalayas
Feed ItemWWF exposes seven sins of dam building
Gland/Berlin - On World Water Day, WWF criticizes dam projects worldwide that continue to violate fundamental sustainability criteria. In the WWF report, "Seven Sins of Dam Building," numerous dam projects under construction or planned are given a failing review by the conservation organization. Aside from the internationally controversial Belo Monte (Brazil) and Xayaburi (Laos) dams, European projects, such as in Austria and Turkey, are also on the list.. The 'seven sins' outlined in the report include issues with dam location, neglecting biodiversity, environmental flows, social and economic factors, and risk analysis. WWF also notes that dam decisions often blindly follow "a bias to build" without considering better, cheaper, and less damaging alternatives. "Properly planned, built, and operated dams can contribute to food and energy security. Unfortunately, short-term interests are too often the focus of decision-making," says Dr. Jian-hua Meng, Water Security Specialist for WWF. "In order to guarantee acceptable levels of social and environmental sustainability, dam installations and operations should be stringently checked against sustainability criteria as formulated under the World Commission on Dams or the Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Protocol. If necessary, insufficiently performing projects must be modified or halted," added Meng. No sustainable outcomes can be expected when dam proponents rely on superior financial strength and political connections rather than on dialogue, transparency, and reason, says WWF. Additionally, some governments lack the capacity or independence to protect public interests. Successful and overall long-term beneficial dam projects need more than just the legal regulator's approval, according to the report. "For large-scale projects, operators must also obtain the 'social license to operate'. Acceptance of the project by the population is fundamental to sustainable management," says Meng. "Negative effects, such as relocation, destruction of cultural sites, or the collapse of local fisheries are still too often dismissed as somebody else's problem." Scientific evidence and risk assessments too frequently lose out to one-sided political or economic agendas, according to the report. Subsequently, dams are still planned and built in ecologically high value areas and biodiversity loss is still too often not accounted for. Serious impacts, caused by a change in the natural water flow dynamics or the disappearance of wetlands, are still not given consideration. Moreover, the size of a dam is not necessarily a deciding factor. Though numerous mega-projects can be found in the report's case studies, the cumulative impact of many small hydro projects, like for instance in Romania, cannot be underestimated. The problems are not limited to developing and emerging countries. G7 companies and engineers continue to not only push projects forward in emerging markets that are unacceptable by global standards, but also in the heart of the EU and North America, reproaches WWF. For example, heavy ecological deterioration looms for three alpine valleys in the Ötztal Alps in Austria, if the extension of the Kaunertal hydroelectric power plants is implemented with the current plans, the report cites. "WWF reviewed nine dams and we found that many projects commit not just one, but many grave sins of dam building. However, these errors are avoidable. Lack of capacity, economic pressure, or specific regional circumstances can no longer be presented as excuses," Meng stated. For further information: Roland Gramling, Press Officer WWF-Germany, roland.gramling@wwf.de +49 30 311 777 425 Gretchen Lyons, Conservation Communications Manager, glyons@wwfint.org +41 79 916 0136
Feed ItemNew forest loss figures highlight need for green growth in the Greater Mekong
Bangkok, Thailand: The Greater Mekong subregion in Southeast Asia risks losing more than a third of its remaining forest cover within the next two decades if regional governments fail to boost protection, value and restore natural capital, and embrace green growth, warns a new WWF report. WWF's analysis reveals the Greater Mekong has retained about 98 million hectares of natural forest, just over half of the region's land area, but further rapid loss is expected if current deforestation rates persist. Between 1973 and 2009, the five countries of the Greater Mekong lost just under one-third of their remaining forest cover. During this period, Cambodia lost 22 per cent of its 1973 forest cover, Laos and Myanmar lost 24 per cent, and Thailand and Vietnam lost 43 per cent. Large connected areas of core forest also declined significantly across the region, from over 70 per cent in 1973 to about 20 per cent in 2009. Core forest is defined as an area of at least 3.2km2 of uninterrupted forest. If current trends continue, WWF predicts that by 2030 only 14 per cent of the Greater Mekong's remaining forest will consist of contiguous habitat capable of sustaining viable populations of many wildlife species. "The Greater Mekong is at a crossroads," said Peter Cutter, Landscape Conservation Manager with WWF-Greater Mekong. "One path leads to further declines in biodiversity and livelihoods, but if natural resources are managed responsibly, this region can pursue a course that will secure a healthy and prosperous future for its people." The report, " Ecosystems in the Greater Mekong: past trends, current status, possible futures ," provides new analysis on the current status and potential future of the region's principal forest and freshwater ecosystems, and some of the most endangered species these ecosystems support. The report offers two scenarios for the region's ecosystems, one predicts what will likely happen by 2030 under an unsustainable growth model in which the deforestation and degradation observed over the past decade persists, while the other scenario assumes a 50 per cent cut in the annual deforestation rate and offers a future based on green growth. Under the green economy scenario, core forest areas extant in 2009 across the five Greater Mekong countries would remain intact. "The green economy approach is the choice for a viable future in the Greater Mekong," added Cutter. "Regional leaders have already affirmed that healthy economic growth goes hand in hand with healthy and productive ecosystems, but fast and effective responses are needed now to avoid permanent environmental degradation." The report highlights the Xayaburi dam development as a key threat to the health and productivity of the Mekong river and delta. The Mekong basin hosts 13 unique, yet connected, freshwater ecosystems, but the controversial Xayaburi project will sever the mainstem of the lower Mekong river, blocking migratory fish and sediment flow with devastating consequences for livelihoods and food security for 60 million people. The report also maps the enormous decline in the range of several important and iconic species of the region, including the tiger, Asian elephant, Irrawaddy dolphin and the endemic saola. The survival of many species in the Greater Mekong depend on the existence of effectively managed protected area systems, and while protected areas have expanded dramatically since 1970, many are not well managed. "Many protected areas exist in name only," added Cutter. "Even relatively secure protected areas are under intense pressure from poaching and timber theft, while others have been reduced in size by government's eager to cash in on land concessions to mining companies or plantation owners." Despite documenting the degradation of ecosystems over the past 50 years, the report also emphasizes the region is still rich in natural resources and the value of its ecosystem services, including food, water and fibre, is among the highest in the world. The Greater Mekong's vast natural wealth provides a significant opportunity for sustainable development, and WWF believes building greener economies is well within reach. "Given that the majority of the region's biological heritage and supporting ecosystems occur in landscapes that cross borders, regional collaboration is critical," concluded Cutter. "Increased and more sustainable investment in maintaining ecosystem integrity must also be a priority at landscape, national, and regional scales."
Feed ItemWWF tool measures cumulative impact of hydropower, mining projects in Amazon
Brasilia — WWF is calling for a widely shared, common vision for Amazonian river basins that are the site of large-scale mining and hydropower projects. "There should be a qualified debate in the national sphere regarding what kind of Amazon we wish to preserve in the future. That means defining which rivers are to be preserved before the accumulated effects of the innumerable hydroelectric and mining projects – which so far have always been analysed individually – create environmental impacts that could be really disastrous," said Pedro Bara, leader of WWF's Living Amazon Initiative infrastructure strategy. Bara presented WWF's ecological vision for the Tapajos river basin at an event in Foz de Iguaçu organised by Sustainable Planet and Editora Abril publishers on the theme of Business, Energy and Environment. The vision is based on an analytical tool known as the Hydrological Information System and Amazon River Assessment (HIS-ARA). The tool integrates hydrological and ecological information to support development of regional ecosystem conservation strategies. Bara said the overall objective is to mitigate conflicts and boost opportunities generated by projects that are decided on in a participatory and transparent manner, and are capable of contributing to a sustainable and prosperous future for the Tapajos basin. Cumulative Impacts HIS-ARA makes it feasible to identify critical areas for biodiversity and for the maintenance of connectivity among the rivers to ensure the integrity of the hydrological networks and the aquatic ecosystems. The same tool takes into consideration the functioning of the ecological systems and all the social and cultural territories in the entire river basin area. In the specific case of the Tapajos River basin, which occupies 6 per cent of Brazilian territory and is highly relevant in scenic, cultural, ecological and hydropower terms, 42 hydroelectric plants of varying dimensions are planned. The so-called Tapajos Complex alone will consist of seven plants, two of which, the Sao Luiz and Jatoba dams, will be mega-installations. The damming of two more free-flowing rivers in the Amazon, the Tapajos River and the Jamanxim River, will flood an estimated 2,500 km2 of land and fragment ecologically, culturally and socially important ecosystems. Among the major social impacts, it will affect the Munduruku indigenous lands, home to more than 10,000 people. "The application of science in the form of tools like HIS-ARA can support decision making and streamline the crucial dialogues associated with large-scale infrastructure projects," said WWF-Brazil CEO Maria Cecilia Wey de Brito. For further information: Denise Oliveira, Head of Communications, Living Amazon Initiative doliveira@wwf.org.br / +55 61 3364.7497 or +55 61 8175.2695 Pedro Bara, Infrastructure Strategy leader, Living Amazon Initiative pedrobara@wwf.org.br / +55 11 3074-4765 About Living Amazon Initiative The Living Amazon Initiative spearheads WWF's efforts to guarantee an ecologically healthy Amazon Biome that maintains its environmental and cultural contribution to local peoples, the countries of the region and the world, by maintaining ecological processes and services within a framework of that propitiates inclusive economic development with social equity and global responsibility. About WWF WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the Earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.
Feed ItemEurope's last wild sturgeons threatened by ongoing illegal fishing and caviar trade&#8212;WWF and TRAFFIC
Bucharest, Romania – Ongoing illegal fishing and trade in caviar in Romania and Bulgaria is threatening the survival of sturgeons in the Danube river basin, finds a new report by WWF and TRAFFIC. The report's findings are based on interviews with caviar retailers and DNA analyses of samples obtained from selected shops, restaurants, markets, street vendors and sturgeon farms in Romania and Bulgaria. Significant information was also obtained in discussions with fishermen. In both countries, a fishing ban currently is in place until 2015. However, Bulgarian fishermen told researchers they used modern equipment such as sonar and GPS, as well as the forbidden traditional hook lines – "carmaci" – to catch wild sturgeons. "Romania and Bulgaria are home to the only viable wild sturgeon populations left in the European Union, and unless this sophisticated illegal fishing is stopped, these fish are doomed," said WWF's Jutta Jahrl, author of the new report. In total, 30 caviar samples were obtained and analysed during the latest study to determine the species of origin (14 in Romania, 14 in Bulgaria and two of Bulgarian farmed caviar in Austria). Of five samples said by vendors to be from wild-caught sturgeons, four were shown to be from the highly sought-after beluga sturgeon (Huso huso). Five of the six sturgeon species native to the Danube river basin, including the beluga, are critically endangered. Illegal fishing – principally for their caviar – is the main direct threat to their survival. "The survey demonstrates that caviar allegedly from wild sturgeons is still being offered for sale in Bulgaria and Romania, despite the current ban," said Jahrl. Although trade in farmed caviar is permitted if containers are specially labeled, eight of the caviar samples bought in fish shops or from street vendors did not have the mandatory labels and codes required under CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) to indicate their legal origin. Of three samples that did possess CITES labels, DNA analysis indicated they were from species or hybrids other than those declared on the label. Furthermore, five samples were mixtures containing more than one species of sturgeon, which is not permitted under the strict CITES rules (except for so called "pressed caviar"), while a further six samples were shown not to be sturgeon caviar, despite being explicitly sold as such. "These cases demonstrate that Bulgaria and Romania need to improve significantly their implementation of European Union Wildlife Trade Regulations and CITES labelling provisions," said TRAFFIC's Katalin Kecse-Nagy. "Consumers should only buy caviar that has authentic CITES labeling, or risk being ripped-off or worse." In 2011, a TRAFFIC study compiled for WWF revealed illegal caviar from Bulgaria and Romania was regularly being seized elsewhere in the EU. "Two years ago, attention was drawn to the need for Bulgaria and Romania to implement stronger controls over the caviar trade, but progress seems to be lacking," said Kecse-Nagy. Researchers also found that vendors in both countries, especially those offering supposedly illegal caviar, only sell to people they trust. The result is a covert chain of custody from poachers to customers involving middlemen and indicating a criminal network. "The illegal caviar trade is not just a wildlife protection issue. It also involves contraband and organized crime, loss of tax revenue for the countries concerned, and there are health and veterinary issues, too," said Kecse-Nagy. "Effective enforcement is a vital prerequisite for a successful fight against poaching and illegal wildlife trade. Tight inland and border controls are crucial, especially at the external frontiers of the EU, such as Moldova, Ukraine and Turkey, together with good national and cross border cooperation." The report also recommends the use of modern technology, such as DNA analysis, to help monitor the caviar trade and for strict control measures to regulate online caviar sales and sturgeon aquaculture operations. The report, Illegal caviar trade in Bulgaria and Romania, was funded by The Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund and WWF.
Feed ItemNova nada za ekolo&#353;ki osetljive reke u Evropi
NVO se raduju vodećim principima za održivu hidroenergiju na rekama Dunavskog sliva, ali će pažljivo pratiti područja visoke ekološke vrednosti Na današnjem sastanku visokih predstavnika Međunarodne komisije za zaštitu reke Dunav (International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River-ICPDR) u Sarajevu, Bosna i Hercegovina, predstavnici zemalja Dunavskog basena uključujući Austriju, Bugarsku, Mađarsku, Rumuniju, Srbiju i Ukrajinu usvojili su smernice za smanjenje štetnog uticaja budućih hidroelektrana na životnu sredinu. „WWF i druge NVO morali su snažno da se bore tokom protekle dve godine kako bi ove smernice učinili prihvatljivim", izjavila je Irene Lucius, rukovodilac grupe za zakonodavstvo, iz WWF Dunavsko-karpatskog programa. "Naše reke su pretrpele zaista mnogo štete od hidroelektrana izgrađenih u ekološki osetljivim područijima i/ili zbog primene zastarelih tehnologija. Zemlje Dunavskog sliva ne mogu da priušte ponavljanje grešaka iz prošlosti – zdravi rečni ekosistemi obezbeđuju dugačak niz usluga ekosistema za ljude kao što su obezbeđivanje vode za piće i smanjenje rizika od poplava." Ono što je činjenica je da najveći izazov tek dolazi. „Vodeći principi neće imati nikakav značaj ako se ne primene brzo i sveobuhvatno kako bi se sprečila nepovratna šteta koju bi izazvala plima budućih hidroelektrana," dodala je Irene Lucius. "Posebno, očekujemo od zemalja Dunavskog sliva da u saradnji sa NVO odrede nova ekološki vredna područja koja treba izostaviti pri planiranju hidroelektrana, kao i da posebno valorizuju prirodne i kulturne vrednosti naših reka pri planiranju novih projekata. „Ne znati kako" više nije izgovor. Vlade mogu da računaju da ćemo ih pažljivo posmatrati." U dokumentu se ne preporučuje razvoj hidroenergetskog potencijala u posebno osetljivim delovima reka kao što su zaštićena područja, područja visoke ekološke vrednosti i gornji tokovi reka. Takođe, promoviše se adekvatno planiranje na nacionalnom i regionalnom nivou u svim delovima reka i razmatranje ekoloških i kulturnih vrednosti. Smernice preporučuju način na koji je neophodno da hidroelektrane smanje negativni uticaj na populacije riba i drugih slatkovodnih organizama. 14 država Dunavskog sliva koje rade zajedno u okviru Međunarodne komisije za zaštitu reke Dunav (ICPDR) su odlučile da razviju „Vodeće principe za razvoj hidroenergije". Nekoliko regionalnih NVO mreža, posebno WWF, IAD, EEA i DEF, su učestvovale u ovom procesu kao posmatrači. ICPDR stalna radna grupa se sastaje svakog juna radi donošenja važnih odluka. Odluka o „Vodećim principima" za razvoj hidroenergetskog potencijala donesena je na sastanku održanom 18. i 19. juna. Hidroelektrane negativno utiču na rečne sisteme na više načina. Njihove brane sprečavaju ribe i druge organizme da migriraju ka mestima mresta ili ishrane. One takođe menjaju prirodan oblik i tok reka, što dovodi do promena u rečnim i plavnim staništima za ptice i umanjuje svojstvo reke za samoprečišćavanje vode. Stoga je veoma važno uspostaviti područja visoke ekološke vrednosti na kojima nije moguća izgradnja novih hidroelektrana, a na područijima sa najnižom ekološkom vrednošću izgraditi nove elektrane sa minimumalnim negativnim uticajem na prirodu. Kako priroda ne poznaje granice, područja visoke i niske ekološke važnosti treba definisati na nivou sliva, kao i na nacionalnom nivou. Neophodno je da zemlje Dunavskog sliva investiraju u izgradnju kapaciteta obnovljivih izvora energije, daleko od toga da je hidroenergija jedina mogućnost, i ušteda energije i energetska efikasnost treba da budu prvi korak ka ublažavanju klimatskih promena. U Austriji, na primer, pregrađivanje preostalih reka koje imaju potencijal za hidroenergiju bi pomoglo da se zadovolji rastuća potražnja za energijom u zemlji za samo pet godina. U zemljama kao što je Rumunija, potencijal za povećanje energetske efikasnosti i, stoga, sniženje potražnje za energijom je ogroman. Ovo pokazuje da samo kombinacija mera, pre svega ušteda energije i energetska efikasnost a onda i upotreba različitih obnovljivih izvora energije, može biti dugoročno rešenje. Na nivou Evropske unije, ovi problemi se ozbiljno shvataju već godinama. Direktori sektora voda Evropske unije su tokom sastanka od 30.11. - 01.12. 2006. godine usvojili „Dokument o okvirnoj direktivi o vodama i hidromorfologiji" (Policy Paper on the Water Framework Directive and Hydromorphology) u kom predlažu područijima sa najnižom ekološkom vrednošću da se „neke od preostalih neregulisanih reka u područijima visokih ekoloških vrednosti odrede kao „no-go" područja za hidroenergetski razvoj". Ovaj pristup je potvrđen izjavom direktora sektora za vode u maju 2010. godine.
Feed ItemDams could signal death knell for Mekong giant catfish
Bangkok, Thailand – Damming the mainstream of the lower Mekong River would represent a significant new threat to the survival of the Mekong giant catfish, one of the world's largest and rarest freshwater fish, according to a new study commissioned by WWF. The study sheds new light on the status of this elusive species, including data on its numbers, distribution, threats and measures needed to prevent its disappearance. While the exact population size is unknown, there could be as few as a couple of hundred adult Mekong giant catfish fish left. According to the study, the Xayaburi dam on the Mekong mainstem in northern Laos would prove an impassable barrier for the migratory giant catfish – which are capable of reaching up to three metres in length and weighing as much as 300kg – and risks sending the species to extinction. "A fish the size of a Mekong giant catfish simply will not be able to swim across a large barrier like a dam to reach its spawning grounds upstream," said the study's author and associate research professor at the University of Nevada, Dr. Zeb Hogan. "These river titans need large, uninterrupted stretches of water to migrate, and specific water quality and flow conditions to move through their lifecycles of spawning, eating and breeding." Species in steep decline Numbers of Mekong giant catfish are already in steep decline due to overfishing, habitat destruction and dams along the Mekong's tributaries. In the Mun River, the largest tributary to the Mekong, a dam already blocks the migrations of the Mekong giant catfish and has isolated the Mun River from the remainder of the Mekong river basin. The study claims that the controversial Xayaburi dam could disrupt and even block spawning, and increase mortality if the fish pass through dam turbines. "It's likely the Mekong giant catfish use the stretch of river of the Xayaburi dam as a migration corridor, with adult fish likely passing through this area on their migration from floodplain rearing areas to upstream spawning sites," added Dr. Hogan. "It is also possible the giant catfish spawn in the area where the dam is now located." Environment and water ministers had agreed at the Mekong River Commission meeting in 2011 to delay a decision on building the Xayaburi dam pending further studies on its environmental impacts. This agreement was swept aside last November when Laos decided to forge ahead with construction. Dam fish passages unproven Criticism of the US$3.5-billion Xayaburi project has been growing with concerns centred on the serious gaps in data and failures to fully account for the impacts of the dam, particularly concerning fisheries and sediment flows. Pöyry, the Finnish firm advising Laos on the dam construction, argues that "fish passages" can be built to enable fish to get past the dam's turbines and swim up and down the river. But this claim has never been successfully put into practice. "You can't expect fish ladders to work without understanding your target species, their swimming capabilities, and the water current that will attract these fish toward the pass entrance," said Dr. Eric Baran with the World Fish Centre. "Research is still needed to ensure mitigation efforts will work." Mekong giant catfish were once widely distributed through the Mekong river basin, possibly as far as Myanmar and south-western China, and were relatively abundant up until the early 1900s. Their numbers have since plummeted and the species is now limited to the Mekong and its tributaries in Cambodia, Laos and Thailand. Catch figures also offer sobering evidence of the species decline, with numbers dropping from thousands of fish in the late 1880s, to dozens in the 1990s, and only a few in recent times. Despite laws being in place in Thailand, Laos and Cambodia to regulate fishing for Mekong giant catfish, with a ban on fishing the species in Thailand and Cambodia, the species is still fished illegally and caught accidentally in fisheries targeting other species. "Catches should be monitored to ensure that Mekong giant catfish are not being illegally targeted by fishers," added Dr. Hogan. "Incidental catch should also be monitored since it is one of the best and only sources of information about the distribution, life history and abundance of this river giant." Urgent efforts needed to save the species The study identifies key measures to prevent the river giant's disappearance, including urgent efforts to safeguarding migratory corridors and critical habitat, and increased international cooperation, such as basin-wide management planning, since the species occurs in an international river and crosses country borders to complete its life cycle. "The Mekong giant catfish symbolizes the ecological integrity of the Mekong River because the species is so vulnerable to fishing pressure and changes in the river environment. Its status is an indicator of the health of the entire river, and its recovery is an important part of the sustainable management of the Mekong basin," said Dr. Lifeng Li, Director of WWF's Global Freshwater Programme. "The Mekong giant catfish can be saved, but it will take a level of commitment from all lower Mekong countries, as well as international organizations and donors, that currently does not exist."
Feed ItemEstuarine Ecology (Coastal Studies Institute - University of North Carolina)
Feed ItemRivers and People - Story of Catchment area around Lake Naivasha, Kenya
Feed ItemCreating a Sustainable Future: Ecosystem Services and Spatial Planning
Feed ItemWelcome to The Zambezi Society : Conserving Wildlife and Wilderness in the Zambezi Valley
Follow this link : Formed in 1982, the Zambezi Society is a conservation organisation which focuses its efforts solely on conserving wildlife and wilderness in the Zambezi Valley. "Our mission is to promote the conservation and environmentally sound management of the Zambezi River and its catchment area for the benefit of wilderness, wildlife and people."
Feed ItemSave Mana Pools National Park - a UNESCO World Heritage site, being now nominated RAMSAR site
Feed ItemRiver restoration in an industrial environment - River Irwell
Feed ItemMotueka Integrated Catchment Management Building
Feed ItemRestoring the Old Brewarrina Mission Wetland
Feed ItemWhy we purchased Naree...
Feed ItemHelping Murray cod in the Murrumbidgee River
Feed ItemLower Murray - Life Flowing Back Into Wetlands
Feed ItemBringing Back the Colorado River Delta - 2013
Feed ItemDanube Delta Europe's largest natural wetland - Romania (Delta Dunarii)
Feed ItemThailand river community - Chao Phraya river
Feed ItemBali's traditional Subak irrigation system, a UNESCO's World Heritage
Feed ItemRod Fensham on the Lake Eyre Basin
Feed ItemAzzam Alwash: Lessons from Iraq's beautiful marshes
Feed ItemPutting Climate Information into Farmers' Hands - Saloum river basin
Feed ItemEstuarine Ecology (Coastal Studies Institute - University of North Carolina)
Feed ItemRivers and People - Story of Catchment area around Lake Naivasha, Kenya
Feed ItemTeaching Resources on Water and Climate
GEF Pacific IWRM Outputs used in US National Science Foundation's Online Education Portal on Climate Change in the Pacific Islands 18th March 2013: The United States based educational organization, PBS LearningMedia, has recently supported the US National Science Foundation to produce an online education portal on Climate Change and the Pacific Islands. This effort has drawn on videos from the GEF Pacific IWRM Project and includes teaching tips, discussion questions, and essay questions for teachers that wish to use these multi-media products in their classrooms. A range of videos from other Pacific intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations are also included. National IWRM teams are urged to share this resource with primary and secondary school teachers in their countries. Check out the Kava Bowl for more information - click here .
Feed ItemFiji IWRM: Building Flood Resilient Communities
Fiji IWRW: New Film Highlights Achievements in Integrating Land and Water Management for Flood Preparedness in Nadi In April 2012 the township of Nadi in Fiji experienced devastating flooding that claimed numerous lives, rendered thousands homeless and left a path of destruction estimated into the hundreds of millions. That was the second raging flood to hit the Pacific’s travel and economic hub in just three months. This documentary highlights the vulnerability of the Pacific SIDS to such devastating climatic events and shows the work of the Nadi Basin Catchment Committee (NBCC), established with support of the GEF Pacific IWRM Project, to strengthen the technical and local coordination aspects of one of the Pacific’s most pressing water issues. Big congratulations to Mr. Vinesh Kumar and the NBCC for their many successes over recent years! No Frames
Feed ItemPacific IWRM: New Short Film from Palau
Palau IWRW: New Film Highlights Challenges and Approaches for Integrated Freshwater and Coastal Management in the Small Islands of Micronesia The following short film entitled was produced by the GEF Pacific IWRM demonstration project team in Palau in collaboration with GEF supported Sustainable Land Management project. Targeted at the next generation of water resource management, the film highlights the strong interconnections between land, freshwater and coastal systems in small island settings. Challenges and approaches for integrated freshwater and coastal management are highlighted. Produced by Oceania TV/Roll’em Productions – great job Jeff, Lynna and team! No Frames
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Nauru
Enhancing water security for Nauru through better water management and reduced groundwater contamination 27th March 2013: Nauru's GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled "Enhancing water security for Nauru through better water management and reduced groundwater contamination" has successfully tested various measures to reduce stress on its fragile freshwater resources. The project has also significantly strengthened arrangements for improved integration of national government and the community in water resource and sanitation management. The results of this work were successfully used to inform the development of a national water and sanitation policy and to leverage additional resources to scale-up stress reduction measures. This Pacific IWRM 'Progress Snapshot' highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl to access Nauru's 'Progress Snapshot' - click here .
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Palau
Restoration of the Ngerikiil Watershed for Improved Water Quality in the Republic of Palau 3 rd April 2013:  Palau’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Ngerikiil Watershed Restoration for Improved Water Quality” has successfully tested various approaches to strengthen national and watershed level coordination of water resource management. The project has made significant contributions to: political awareness and support of IWRM; protection and rehabilitation of Ngerikiil Watershed including increase in land area rehabilitated, establishment of buffer zones, and the mitigation of pollution sources; leveraging of financing for ongoing watershed conservation; and increased collaboration between agencies that manage water and sanitation. Presidential endorsement of Palau’s 1st Water and Sanitation Policy is a key outcome. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access Palau’s ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Niue
Integrating Land Use, Water Supply and Wastewater Management to Protect Alofi Town’s Groundwater Supply and Nearshore Reef Fishery 10 th  April 2013: Niue’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Using Integrated Land Use, Water Supply and Wastewater Management as a Protection Model for the Alofi Town Groundwater Supply and Nearshore Reef Fishery” has made great progress in strengthening legal frameworks for water resource management and securing access to safe drinking water. Key project results include: enactment of the Niue Water Act, which provides the nations first framework for water allocation and water resource protection; establishment and implementation of National and Village Drinking Water Safety Plans to provide safe drinking water to all central areas in Niue; and on ground works to improve Niue’s water security, through reducing water loss through leakage and increasing water storage. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access Niue’s ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Samoa
Rehabilitation and Sustainable Management of the Apia Catchment 12 th  April 2013: Samoa’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Rehabilitation and Sustainable Management of the Apia Catchment” has made great progress in strengthening legal frameworks for water resource management and securing access to safe drinking water. Key project results include: Protection of land for inclusion in land reserve to reduce stress on water systems; finalisation of 3 Watershed Management Plans that define buffer zones and natural reserves; development of the Watershed Conservation Policy to guide legislation to reserve upland areas for water resource conservation; and on ground rehabilitation works to improve water quality. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access Samoa’s ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in the RMI
Integrated Water and Land Management for the Sustainable use of the Laura Water Lens, Majuro Atoll 16 th  April 2013: RMI’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Integrated Water and Land Management for the Sustainable use of the Laura Water Lens, Majuro Atoll” has successfully tested various approaches to reducing groundwater pollution. The project has also strengthened national and watershed level coordination of water resource management. Key project results include: establishment and operation of a National IWRM Task Force that has facilitated the development of a National Water and Sanitation Policy; strengthened community engagement through the establishment of the Laura Lens Committee; reduced stress on the Laura Water Lens through various demonstration initiatives. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access RMI’s ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Fiji
Integrated Flood Risk Management in the Nadi River Basin, Fiji 23 rd  April 2013: Fiji’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Integrated Flood Risk Management in the Nadi River Basin” is successfully strengthening governance structures to develop a flood risk management plan and is empowering communities to be more disaster resilient and independent. Key project results include: establishment of the Nadi Basin Catchment Committee; endorsement of project design and M&E Plan by Steering Committee; development of the Nadi Integrated Flood Risk management Plan; rehabilitation of two degraded areas in the catchment and successful trials of sustainable land and forest management practices with landowners. This Pacific IWRM ‘Progress Snapshot’ highlights results achieved to date. Visit the Kava Bowl  to access Fiji’s ‘Progress Snapshot’ – click here .
Feed ItemThe scientific conference
The scientific conference of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences dedicated to results of joint Russian-Mongolian projects.
Feed ItemPublic campaigns
“Clean ice of Baikal”, shoreline and ice clean-up campaigns
Feed Item"Clean Ice of Baikal"
Shoreline and ice cleanup public event
Feed ItemThe Inter-Fractional deputy group “Baikal”
The Inter-Fractional deputy group “Baikal” was established in The State Duma of the Russian Federation
Feed ItemOlympiad of schoolchildren
Olympiad of schoolchildren on ecology
Feed ItemBaikal state natural biosphere reserve
PMU meeting with administration of Baikal state natural biosphere reserve.
Feed ItemBiannual meeting
Biannual meeting of UNDP ecosystem management and adaptation projects
Feed Item"Clean shoreline of Selenga"
Shoreline cleanup public event
Feed ItemUNOPS IWC Management Workshop
UNOPS International Waters Cluster Management Workshop
Feed ItemAnnual workshop (Dundee, Scotland)
3rd Annual workshop on International legislation and transboundary freshwater.
Feed ItemConference of working group
Conference of working group for preparation of Russian-Mongolian plenipotentiary meeting
Feed ItemMeeting in Zabaikalsky National Park
Meeting with administration of Zabaikalsky National Park
Feed ItemPress-conference on the Lake Baikal
Current problems of the project were covered by PM Sergey Kudelya.
Feed ItemTDA Workshop
Feed ItemA scientific conference “Setting the International Waters Science Priorities for the next Decade”
Feed ItemA meeting of representatives of Audit Chamber of Russia and the General Auditor of the National Audit of Mongolia
Feed ItemSession in Hydrochemical Institute
Feed ItemTwinning Exchange to the Sava River Basin Commission
This twinning exchange was conducted from 5th to the 7th of December at the premises of the International Sava River Basin Commission in Zagreb, Croatia and at various sites in the region associated with the joint management of the Sava River Basin.
Feed ItemWorkshop on OECD – NGO “RREC” project results
Workshop on OECD – NGO “RREC” project results "Improving the usage of economic instruments for water resources management and water sector in the Russian Federation"
Feed ItemWorkshop on tourism development in protected natural areas
Feed ItemXI Plenipotentiary meeting
XI Plenipotentiary meeting on implementation the agreement between the Governments of the Russian Federation and Mongolia on the Protection and usage of transboundary water resources.
Feed ItemThe outline plan for spring parliament session 2013
The outline plan for spring parliament session 2013 was approved by The State Duma Committee on Natural Resources, Environment and Ecology on 20 December 2012.
Feed ItemVolunteer ecologic camp
Opening of summer volunteer ecologic camp in Sukhaya village (Buryatia).
Feed ItemV International Scientific Conference “Selenga – river without borders”
“Selenga – river without borders” Theoretical and practical conference in Ulan-Ude
Feed Item"Baikal dialogue" Forum
"Baikal dialogue" Forum
Feed ItemAll-Russian symposium “Topical problems of analytical chemistry. Analytical methods of environmental objects analysis"
All-Russian symposium on analytical chemistry in Ulan-Ude
Feed ItemThe second ecological movie festival H2O
Feed ItemWorkshop on transboundary diagnostic analysis
A Workshop on transboundary diagnostic analysis was held in Ulan-Ude on 18-19 September 2012.
Feed Item1st Asia Pacific Targeted Regional Workshop for GEF IW Projects
Bangkok, Thailand The workshop resembled an International Waters Conference at the regional scale, with a focus on inter-project knowledge sharing (Best Lessons and Challenges).
Feed ItemShoreline clean-up campaign on Hovsgol Lake and setup of a water sanitation zone in Khatgal village
Feed ItemThe Conference dedicated to the 10th anniversary of the Ministry of Natural Resources of the Republic of Buryatia
Feed ItemBringing together Selenga-Baikal research one-day international workshop
Geneva, Switzerland The International Workshop “Bringing together Selenga-Baikal research”, devoted to exploration and preservation of Selenga river and Lake Baikal ecosystems was organized on October, 31 at the International Center of Moscow State University in Geneva, Switzerland.
Feed Item”Assessment of groundwater resources”
Meeting of representatives of Ministry of environment and green development of Mongolia, UNESCO and UNDP CO Mongolia ”Assessment of groundwater resources”
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-035 «Shoreline and ice cleanup campaigns for Lake Baikal and Selenga River», application period: 20 March 2013 - 08 April 2013
Feed ItemNew tenders announcement
«Shoreline and ice cleanup campaigns for Lake Baikal and Selenga River»
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-053 «Friends of Baikal Basin” conception designing and implementation, Mongolia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-038 «Intercalibration of analytical procedures for analytes, included into harmonized program of hydrochemical monitoring for Selenga river basin (Mongolia)», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-041 «Development of optimal technological solutions for safe storage, retreatment, neutralization and utilization of toxic substances, contained in waste products of inoperative...», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Development of optimal technological solutions for safe storage, retreatment, neutralization and utilization of toxic substances, contained in waste products of inoperative mining enterprise “Dzhidinsky”
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-042 «Development of technological solutions for minimization of anthropogenic impact of adit mine waters of Kholodninsky poly-metal deposit on water ecosystems», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-044 «Biodiversity compatible tourism plan for the site of goddess Yangima representation of face on stone near Bargusinski Buddhist Temple, village Yaricto, Buriatiya, Russia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 15 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-037 «Recommendations on environmental investments on active concerns to reduce pollution discharge in the Russian Federation», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-039 «Intercalibration of analytical procedures for analytes, included into harmonized program of hydrochemical monitoring for Selenga river basin (The Russian Federation)», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-040 «Setting up the model of pollutants transport and water balance in the Baikal Basin», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-045 «Complex eco-travel tour for the Baikal State Nature Biosphere Reserve», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-046 «Pilot sport fishing program», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-047 «The Ecological Atlas of the Baikal Basin development, Mongolia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-048 «The Ecological Atlas of the Baikal Basin development, Russia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-043 «Development of computer analysis of space images of Barguzinsky and Kurumkansky districts..." application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Tender RFQ_EMO_2013-043 «Development of computer analysis of space images of Barguzinsky and Kurumkansky districts of the Republic of Buryatia for identification of abandoned cattle mortuaries in Barguzinsky and Kurumkansy districts, and carrying out of microbiological analysis of soil in order to reveal the anthrax strains», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-049 «Baikal Information Center (BIC) maintenance, Mongolia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-050 «Baikal Information Center (BIC) maintenance, Russia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_EMO_2013-054 «NGO Network “Friends of Baikal Basin” conception designing and implementation, Russia», application period: 04 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-036 «Monitoring of water quality on Selenga Delta», application period: 16 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-055 «Training for rising awareness and improvement in management of stakeholders in Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS) and Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs)», application period: 16 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-056 «Documentary movie production», application period: 16 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
Feed ItemTender RFQ_GPSO_2013-057 «Development of technological solutions for minimization of anthropogenic impact of ore gold mining and processing enterprises on environment », application period: 16 April 2013 - 25 April 2013
"Development of technological solutions for minimization of anthropogenic impact of ore gold mining and processing enterprises on environment"
Feed ItemDernière mise à jour : 21 decembre 2012
Comité technique en Republique Dominicaine Le 11 décembre 2012, dans la salle polyvalente no 1 du ministère de l'environnement et des ressources naturelles de la République dominicaine s'est tenue la réunion du Comité technique du projet avec les représentants techniques des institutions partenaires du projet. Dans ce comité on a discuté sur le Plan de la gestion et la gouvernance du bassin versant. Ce Comité a permis   d’analyser les résultats du projet pour l'année 2012 et le Plan de travail annuel de 2013.   Création du groupe de l'Agriculture-RD Ce vendredi 7decembre 2012 : le projet Binational de Artibonite a accueilli la première réunion du groupe de l'Agriculture du ministère de l'agriculture, point focal du groupe. Dans cette réunion on eu la présence des institutions publiques et privées qui gèrent la production de l'Agriculture dans le bassin Versant de l'Artibonite a permis la validation des termes de référence du groupe et également identifié les informations disponible pour alimenter l'analyse diagnostique transfrontalière. La réunion sera également permettre l'élaboration de l'agenda du groupe pour l'année 2012 et planifier les prochaines étapes pour travailler avec le groupe. Comité Directeur Binational Le comité directeur binational du projet a été célébré ce mardi 13 novembre 2012 à Santo Domingo, avec les représentants de nombreuses institutions partenaires du projet des deux pays. Les représentants des institutions qui composent la table directive du projet ont notamment valide le Plan Annuel du Projet pour l’année 2013. Comité National de Pilotage en Haïti Un atelier de travail a été réalisé avec le comité national de pilotage en Haïti le 30 octobre dans l’objectif de procéder à l’approbation du programme annuel d’activités du Projet, la confirmation d’un calendrier d’exécution pour l’année 2013 et la préparation de la réunion du comité binational en République Dominicaine. Les membres du comité national de pilotage, durant cet atelier de travail, ont statué sur le programme annuel d’activités proposé par les coordinations nationale et régionale du projet.  Il s’agira, avec une participation active des institutions clés, de s’assurer de façon permanente que les principaux aspects des travaux à réaliser soient directement liés à l’Analyse Diagnostique Transfrontalière (ADT) et pose réellement les bases pour l’élaboration du Plan d’Action Stratégique (PAS). Comité Directeur National RD Suite au Comité technique RD, le projet a célébré ce 18 octobre 2012, le comité directeur national afin de valider le Plan annuel 2013 avant que celui-ci ne soit présenté au Comité Directeur Binational. Les représentants de plusieurs institutions partenaires du projet étaient présents pour l'occasion. Foire eco-touristique  de San Juan de la Maguana - 2012 Du 18 au 28 octobre 2012, à San Juan de la Maguana, s'est tenue la Foire ecotouristique et de production, laquelle comme chaque année permet au public d’Haïti et de République Dominicaine de connaitre les initiatives de développement réalisées sur la zone frontalière. Le projet binational Artibonite a profité de l’événement pour ouvrir un stand durant toute la durée de la foire afin de présenter au grand public le projet et de sensibiliser la population au thèmes de l’aménagement de bassin versant et de protection des ressources naturelles.   Comité Technique RD Le 16 octobre 2012, dans le salon de conference du Ministère de l'Environnement et des Ressources Naturelles de la République Dominicaine, s'est tenu le comité technique du projet avec les représentants techniques des différentes institutions associées au projet. Ce comité a permis d'analyser les résultats du projet sur l’année 2012 et le Plan Annuel de l’année 2013 en vue de leur validation durant le comité directeur national puis durant le comité directeur binational du projet. Visite de connaissance du bassin versant dans sa partie haïtienne Du 1er au 6 octobre 2012, la deuxième visite de connaissance du bassin versant a été réalisée dans la partie haïtienne avec des représentants d'institutions haïtiennes (Ministère de l'Agriculture et de l'Environnement, Centre National de l'Information Géospatiale, etc.) et dominicaines (DGDF, INDHRI, Ministère de l'Environnement et Ressources Naturelles...). La délégation a visité les zones d'interventions de plusieurs projets publiques et privés ainsi que les projets pilotes du projet binational Artibonite dans les zones de St Michel, Ennery, Gonaives, Verettes et Mirebalais. La visite a permis également de connaitre le conseil de gestion du bassin versant d'Ennery Quinte, lequel servira de base a la structure de gouvernance qui sera établie dans le bassin versant haïtien de l'Artibonite. La délégation a également révisé les indicateurs du projet binational Artibonite afin d'obtenir une base de travail accordée entre les 2 parties. Comité National de Pilotage en Haïti La réunion du comité national de pilotage du projet en Haïti a été réalisée le vendredi 07 septembre 2012. Cet atelier de travail s’est inscrit dans le cadre de la révision du programme annuel, de l’approbation du programme du dernier trimestre de l’année 2012 et du suivi des activités par le comité national de pilotage du Projet Binational Artibonite. Durant cet atelier, les membres du comité se sont prononcés sur les activités déjà réalisées et les modifications proposées au programme annuel par les coordinations nationale et régionale du projet. Visite de connaissance du bassin versant dans sa partie dominicaine Du 6 au 10 aout 2012, un visite de connaissance du bassin versant dans sa partie dominicaine a été réalisée avec des représentants d'institutions haïtiennes (Ministère de l'Agriculture et de l'Environnement, Centre National de l'Information Géospatiale, etc.) et dominicaines (DGDF, INDHRI, Ministère de l'Environnement et Ressources Naturelles...). La délégation a visité les zones d'interventions de plusieurs projets publiques et privés, depuis Hondo Valle jusqu’à Rio Limpio en passant par Las Dos Bocas et Restauracion, et a identifié les sites potentiels de création de barrages hydro-électriques. Elle a également débuté l’élaboration des indicateurs du projet binational Artibonite, lesquels seront révisés lors de la visite du bassin versant dans sa partie haïtienne, programme pour le quatrième trimestre de l’année. Création des comités de sous-bassins et micro-bassins en vue de la création du Conseil de Bassin Versant de l'Artibonite Cette semaine du 16 juillet est la semaine de création du premier comité de sous-bassin en vue de créer le Conseil de Bassin Versant de l'Artibonite. Le premier comité a été créé sur le sous-bassin Vallecito, affluent de la partie haute du fleuve Artibonite, avec les acteurs locaux d’institutions publiques et privées. Deuxième atelier d’élaboration de la méthodologie de mesure de l’érosion des sols et de coordination entre le GTI et le CIP Du 17 au 20 juillet 2012, le projet binational Artibonite a réalisé la deuxième rencontre entre experts d'institutions haïtiennes et dominicaines (Ministère de l'Environnement, de l'Agriculture, Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement, représentants d'ONG locales, entres autres) dans la ville de Comendador, afin de réaliser le calendrier des activités de la mesure de dégradation des sols. Les deux délégations ont élaboré une planification et un budget détaillés dudit processus, pour pouvoir initier les mesures au cours de cette année.  L'atelier a également permis de planifier les activités conjointes du GTI et du CIP (structures nationales de la Convention des Nations Unies de Lutte contre la Sécheresse et la Désertification). Un calendrier d’activités a été élaboré et les actions prioritaires identifiées. Atelier de planification du Projet Pilote d’implémentation d'un modèle d'administration orienté a bassin versant Du 12 au 13 juillet 2012, dans la ville de Santo Domingo, le projet binational Artibonite a organisé l'atelier de planification du Projet Pilote no. 3 avec les différentes institutions impliquées dans les activités : Ministère de l'Environnement, Ministère de l’Économie, Planification et Développement, gouvernement local des provinces d’Elias Piña, San Juan et Dajabon... L'atelier a permis de planifier les activités du projet sur 2 ans afin de pouvoir débuter les travaux de renforcement des UGAMs, Directions provinciales du Ministère de l'Environnement et les associations de municipalités, et pour élaborer un cadre de gestion cohérent des ressources naturelles entre les différentes institutions de l’État présentes dans le bassin versant.   Réunion binationale d'harmonisation des données cartographiques A Hinche (Haiti), s'est tenue la deuxième réunion de coordination entre le Centre National de l'Information Géospatiale (CNIGS) d’Haïti et la Direccion de la Informacion Ambiental y Recursos Naturales (DIARENA - Ministère de l'Environnement) de la République Dominicaine pour harmoniser les nomenclatures et méthodologies de création des cartes couvrants le bassin versant de l'Artibonite. Du 26 au 28 juin 2012, les deux équipes techniques ont élaboré un agenda de création de carte et se sont mis d'accord sur les critères techniques d’élaboration de celles-ci. Au total, une vingtaine de cartes seront produites, portant sur les conditions socio-économiques et bio-physiques du bassin versant.   Réunion binationale d’élaboration de la methodologie de mesure de la degradation des sols et de coordination GTI / CIP A Hinche (Haïti), les 23 et 24 mai 2012, se sont réunis les experts d'institutions dominicaines et haïtiennes pour identifier la méthodologie de mesure de la dégradation de sols qui sera appliquée sur tout le bassin versant. Les représentants des deux Ministères de l'Environnement, ainsi que des instituts cartographiques, d'ONG privées, et d’Université des deux pays, étaient présents et ont identifié une méthodologie qui pourra être appliquée dans le contexte haïtien et dominicain. Cette méthodologie sera révisée en détail lors d'un second atelier qui sera réalisé en RD. La réunion a permis également de rapprocher le Grupo Tecnico Interinstitucional - RD et le Comité Inter-institutionnel de Pilotage - Haïti, les deux structures nationales mises en place dans le cadre de la Convention des Nations Unies de Lutte contre la Sécheresse et la Désertification. Les représentants de ces deux structures ont initie le dialogue pour l’élaboration d'un agenda de travail commun. Cet agenda sera défini lors de la prochaine réunion qui sera réalisée en RD. Reunion finale de la session d'ateliers d'identification des problèmes d'utilisation de l'eau dans les municipalités du bassin versant Ce vendredi 27 avril 2012, dans le Club de la Cooperativa Central de Las Matas de Farfan, le projet binational Artibonite, le Ministère de l'Environnement et Ressources Naturelles et le groupe de gouvernance (composé de la DGDF, du CONIAF, du programme ART-PNUD, de la DIGECOOM, et de la DGODT) ont organisé la réunion finale de présentation des résultats des travaux d'identification des problèmes d'utilisation de l'eau dans les municipalités du bassin versant. Plus d'une centaine de personnes provenant de tout le  bassin versant étaient présentes (depuis Rio Limpio jusqu’à Hondo Valle) pour assister à la présentation des résultats des différents ateliers. Les autorités locales des trois provinces qui composent le bassin versant (Elias Piña, San Juan et Dajabon) étaient également présentes pour célébrer la clôture de ces travaux. Le rapport élaboré sera intégré à l'Analyse Diagnostique Transfrontalière du projet binational Artibonite. Ouverture de la session d'ateliers d'identification des problèmes d'utilisation de l'eau dans les municipalités du bassin versant Aujourd'hui, jeudi 23 février 2012, débute la session d'ateliers dans tout le bassin versant dominicain pour identifier les problèmes de qualité et de quantité d'eau des différentes municipalités et districts municipaux. Au cours de chaque semaine, le projet travaillera avec les acteurs des principaux secteurs d'une même municipalité (secteurs éducation, santé, production agricole, etc) afin d'identifier les problèmes d'utilisation de l'eau, de les prioriser et de séparer les problèmes strictement nationaux de ceux qui sont transfrontaliers. A la fin de chaque semaine, les différents secteurs d'une même municipalité se réunissent pour finaliser l'analyse et la présenter au projet et aux représentants du Ministère de l'Environnement et des Ressources Naturelles. Cette dernière journée est également l'occasion pour le Ministère de présenter la structure du Conseil de bassin versant (Consejo de Cuenca) qui sera mise en place au cours de l’année 2012. Cette semaine, la municipalité de Las Matas de Farfan (ainsi que les Districts municipaux qui y sont lies) sera la première a être analysée. Suivront les municipalités et districts municipaux de Pedro Corto, El Cercado, Hondo Valle, Juan Santiago, Rancho La Guardia, Pedro Santana, Banica, Sabana Cruz, Higuerito, Comendador,El Llano, Guanito, Guayabo, Restauracion y Rio Limpio.  Création du groupe de Café - RD Mercredi 29 février 2012: le projet binational Artibonite a eu l'honneur de célébrer la première réunion du groupe de Café avec l'appui du Ministère de l'Environnement et Ressources Naturelles, et de CODOCAFE, point focal du groupe. La réunion, qui a réuni les institutions publiques et privées ayant trait a la gestion et production de Café dans le bassin de l'Artibonite a permis de valider les termes de références du groupe ainsi que d'identifier les informations disponibles pour alimenter l'Analyse Diagnostique Frontalier. La réunion aura permis également d’élaborer l'agenda du groupe pour cette année 2012. Création du groupe de Ressources Forestières - RD Le projet binational Artibonite a eu l'honneur de célébrer la première réunion du groupe de ressources forestières avec le Vice-Ministère des Ressources Forestières du Ministère de l'Environnement et Ressources Naturelles, point focal du groupe, ce jeudi 19 janvier 2012. Cette réunion, qui a réuni les institutions publiques et privées ayant trait a la gestion des ressources forestières dans le bassin de l'Artibonite a permis de valider les termes de références du groupe ainsi que d'identifier les informations disponibles pour alimenter l'Analyse Diagnostique Frontalier. La réunion aura permis également d’élaborer l'agenda du groupe pour cette année 2012. Atelier de travail du groupe de gouvernance Le 9 décembre 2011, à Comendador de Elias Pi ñ a, s'est tenu l'atelier de travail du groupe de gouvernance avec les acteurs locaux de la province d'Elias Piña, afin de présenter le projet et de réaliser un premier travail d'identification des acteurs de la province. L'atelier a permis également de présenter au public  une structure de gouvernance au niveau de la République Dominicaine : le Conseil de Bassin (Consejo de Cuenca), lequel devrait permettre de guider les discussions au niveau local quant à la gestion des ressources en eau et en sols du bassin de l'Artibonite.  _____________________________________________________________________________  Premier comité directeur binational du Projet Le premier comité directeur binational du Projet a eu lieu le 10 novembre 2011 dans la ville de Port-au-Prince (Haïti). Le Comité a réuni les ministres et représentants des ministères de l’environnement, de l’agriculture et de la planification de la République Dominicaine et d’Haïti, les représentants du PNUD Haïti et de République Dominicaine, ainsi que l’équipe de projet au complet. L’événement a permis de valider le Plan Opérationnel Annuel du Projet pour l’année 2012 et de réaliser le suivi des activités mises en œuvre durant 2011.
Feed ItemPRESS RELEASE:SENIOR AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK OFFICIAL VISITS LVBC
The Director for East Africa Regional resource Centre at the African Development Bank (AfDB), Mr. Gabriel Negatu, has visited the Lake Victoria Basin Commission (LVBC) Secretariat in Kisumu, Kenya.
Feed ItemPopulation, Health and Environment (PHE) program to boost integration of sectors in Lake Victoria Basin
Nairobi, KENYA, 18 th April 2013: The Lake Victoria Basin Commission (LVBC) has underscored the importance of the newly-commenced integrated Population, Health and Environment (PHE) program to be implemented in the Lake Victoria Basin. The USAID East Africa funded program aims at strengthening regional coordination, advocacy, capacity building and policy harmonization in relation to PHE.
Feed ItemGroundwater management: a dilemma in the Upper Bhima Basin
Newly published research from the International Water management Institute (IWMI) and partners has turned the groundwater spotlight on the Upper Bhima River Basin in central Maharastra State and raised alarming concerns about future groundwater availability.
Feed ItemTechnical Consultation on International Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF Guidelines)
Technical Consultation to negotiate the final text of the International Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF Guidelines) which shall be be presented for approval to the 31st Session of the Committee on Fisheries. Registration Registration Form for International Organizations / Formulaire d’inscription pour Organisations Internationales / Formulario de inscripción para Organizaciones Internacionales Information for Delegates to Meetings at FAO Headquarters Meeting documents Web site: http://www.fao.org/fishery/ssf/guidelines/en
Feed ItemSouth Africa makes marine conservation history by declaring Prince Edward Islands a marine protected area
Cape Town, South Africa: WWF-South Africa (WWF-SA) is elated over Minister Edna Molewa's recent formal announcement of the declaration of the Prince Edward Islands as a marine protected area (MPA) – Africa`s first offshore MPA. Dr Morné du Plessis, WWF-SA's Chief Executive says, "This is a historic day for marine conservation in South Africa.
Feed ItemSnapshot of Pacific IWRM Progress in Samoa
Rehabilitation and Sustainable Management of the Apia Catchment 12 th  April 2013: Samoa’s GEF Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project entitled “Rehabilitation and Sustainable Management of the Apia Catchment” has made great progress in strengthening legal frameworks for water resource management and securing access to safe drinking water. Key project results include: Protection of land for inclusion in land reserve to reduce stress on water systems; finalisation of 3 Watershed Management Plans that define buffer ...
Feed ItemFourth Workshop on Adaptation to Climate Change in Transboundary Basins ( 25 Jun 2013)
The Fourth Workshop on Adaptation to Climate Change in Transboundary Basins will take place in the Palais des Nations Geneva on 25–26 June 2013 backtoback with the sixth meeting of the Task Force on Water and Climate (Geneva 27 June 2013)The workshop will offer a platform for exchanging experience on adaptation strategies best practices success factors and lessons learned with a particular focus on transboundary climate change adaptation s...
Feed ItemWorkshop on transboundary water cooperation Latin American and PanEuropean regions sharing experiences and learning from each other ( 11 Jun 2013)
The Workshop on Transboundary Water Cooperation “Latin American and PanEuropean Regions Sharing Experiences and Learning from Each Other” will take place from 11 to 12 June 2013 in Buenos Aires Argentina A targeted event for GEF IW projects and partners entitled “GEF IW LEARN Integration Dialogue on Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in the ECLAC region” will take place back–toback with the Workshop on 13 June 2013 Participants attending the Workshop are ...
Feed ItemWorking Towards a Shared Vision for Sustainable Coastal Tourism in Kribi, Cameroon
By Santiago Ormeno and Geoffrey Omedo (In this section, we highlight some of the lessons, experiences and best practices from our COAST Kribi Demo Site in Cameroon)
Feed ItemThe COAST Project’s Governance and Management Mechanisms for Sustainable Tourism in Coastal Areas in Africa
By Marcel Leijzer, UNWTO
Feed ItemTowards good governance in Integrated Coastal Zone Management in Algeria
Workshops held in Algeria for the preparation of a national Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) strategy
Feed Item"Climagine", a participatory method introduced in Croatia
"Climagine", a participatory method introduced in Croatia for sustainable coastal zone management and climate variability and change
Feed ItemAnnual MedPartnership Coordination Group Meeting held in Paris
The MedPartnership Coordination group held its annual meeting at the UNESCO in Paris, France from 3 to 5 April 2013
Feed ItemPotential Fishery Collapse in Lake Tanganyika
Lake Tanganyika, which falls under the administration of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Zambia, and Burundi, is the world’s second largest freshwater lake by volume and a haven for aquatic wildlife. The lake (map at left taken from here) is home to about 2,000 species of fish, most of which are found nowhere else in the world. Such diversity is possible both because of the lake’s size and antiquity; geologists believe Lake Tanganyika to be between 9 and 12 million years old. Eons of isolation have allowed a very distinctive ecosystem to form, similar to other large inland bodies of water like Lake Victoria and Lake Baikal. Lake Tanganyika also forms a vital pillar of human life in the area. The lake is a key protein source for millions of locals, and its fisheries directly employ hundreds of thousands of workers.
Feed ItemTowards good governance in Integrated Coastal Zone Management in Algeria
More than 120 participants attended two workshops held in Algeria for the preparation of a national Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) strategy. The workshops were organised by the Ministry of Land-use Planning, Environment and Town with the support of PAP/RAC.
Feed ItemEmpowering People Through Integrated Water Resource Management Practices: By Akiko Yamamoto
Approximately 64 per cent of Africa’s land surface lies within its 63 transboundary river basins as compared to 47 per cent globally. For the southern Africa region, defined by the boundaries of member states of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), 16 transboundary basins provide nearly 80 per cent of the region’s available water resources. All but one continental SADC state has over 50 per cent of their land mass in transboundary river basins. Some countries rely on more than 50 per cent of their water needs flowing from outside of their borders. In this context, water cooperation has been a serious matter for many African countries throughout their history and is increasingly so as their economies grow and become increasingly integrated.
Feed Item"Climagine", a participatory method introduced in Croatia
Within the framework of MedPartnership sister project "Integration of climate variability and change into national strategies for Integrated Coastal Zone Management", the first "Climagine" workshop was organised in Šibenik, Croatia on 8 April 2013. The workshop was jointly organised by the Plan Bleu, PAP/RAC and the County, and was opened by Mr. Goran Pauk, President of the Šibenik-Knin County. Fifty participants, including representatives of national, regional and local authorities and institutions, academic community and NGOs attended the workshop.
Feed ItemMore than 3 million hectares of elephant, gorilla habitat get new protection
Gland, Switzerland — More than 3 million hectares of newly designated Ramsar sites in the Republic of Congo will provide vital habitat to endangered species and support the livelihoods of surrounding communities. Congo now counts 10 Wetlands of International Importance, totalling 11.7 million hectares.  Anada Tiega, Secretary General of the International Convention on Wetlands, congratulated the Republic of Congo for this major conservation milestone achieved with WWF's support. Tiega said these new designations come at an opportune time, as nations meet in Hyderabad, India, to shore up commitments to protecting biological diversity. "During the last meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity, the 193 member nations set a target to protect at least 17 per cent of their terrestrial and inland water ecosystems by 2020. This move by the Republic of Congo demonstrates how protecting wetlands through Ramsar can help countries meet their commitments," said Tiega. The new sites harbour a wealth of plant and animal species, including several IUCN Red-Listed species such as hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), African elephant (Loxodonta africana), western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes). They are also home to hundreds of fish species, which are both a source of nutrition and income for surrounding communities. The marshes, ponds, lakes and flooded forests are part of the migration path of more than 200 species of bird. The sites are: •Odzala Kokoua: 1,300,000ha, West Basin Division •Ntokou Pikounda: 427,200ha, Sangha Basin Division •Vallée du Niari: 1,581,000ha, South of the Republic of Congo Protecting habitat for charismatic species could enhance tourism opportunities in the Republic of Congo, with potential economic, environmental and social benefits. Sustainable tourism practiced in and around wetlands can contribute to poverty alleviation through the improvement of livelihoods, regional and national economies and support to local cultures. For further information: Gretchen Lyons, Conservation Communications Manager, glyons@wwfint.org +41 79 916 0136 About WWF WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the Earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption. panda.org/news for latest news and media resources About Ramsar The Convention on Wetlands – called the "Ramsar Convention" – is an intergovernmental treaty that embodies the commitments of its member countries to maintain the ecological character of their wetlands of International Importance and to plan for the "wise use", or sustainable use, of all of the wetlands in their territories. Ramsar.org
Feed ItemWWF: Agreement on finance key to success at Hyderabad biodiversity meet
Hyderabad, India  - The first week of negotiations at the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Hyderabad closed with governments from developed and developing nations locked in difficult discussions on critical issues including setting clear finance targets, conserving valuable ocean areas and its relationship with the UN climate convention, the UNFCCC. 

 Summarizing the key challenges facing the CBD in the week ahead, WWF International's Coordinator for Biodiversity Policy Rolf Hogan said: "So far, the biggest hurdle we've seen emerge are differences of opinion between developed and developing nations on finance issues. Developed countries do not want to commit more money to reach resource mobilization targets, and developing countries are saying that if no money is made available, then they will 'walk away' from their Nagoya commitments." "We need countries to agree on how to increase financing for biodiversity. This means agreeing to increasing public biodiversity funding by 20% as well as increasing national budgets and developing new and additional financing mechanisms that can support the achievement of the 20 Targets of the CBD's masterplan up to 2020."

 "We also need to engage the private sector and ensure development and foreign direct investments do not destroy biodiversity." "An agreement on finance is the key to success of COP 11. The stakes are high: if counties don't find a way to move beyond the hurdles they encountered in the first week, it could derail the commitments made in Nagoya two years ago." 

 Encouraging signs
 "In spite of the challenges in some areas, WWF is encouraged to see signs of progress, and believes that success can still be attained if nations step up to match the level of ambition we saw two years ago in Nagoya." "There are also positive signs that many countries, including emerging economies, will commit to new funding, but only if other nations reciprocate."   "It is important for Parties to get things right at Hyderabad. Success here means a clear path forward to the 2020 Aichi Targets."

 Conserving ocean biodiversity 

 Negotiations on protecting important ocean areas are also facing difficulties, with a block of nations opposing the 'endorsement' of reports that identify important areas for conservation in ocean areas beyond national jurisdictions. "Over 50 percent of the world's oceans fall outside of national boundaries. WWF encourages delegates to commit to clearly identifying ocean areas of value that fall beyond national jurisdictions," said Nanie Ratsifandrihamanana, Conservation Director of WWF Madagascar. 

 "Establishing marine protected areas are part of the broader package of solutions that can help governments and businesses safeguard our oceans' enormous ecological, social, and economic benefits," she added. 

Climate and REDD+

 Negotiations on REDD+ are becoming root bound with some countries pushing to maintain a clear separation between the CBD and UNFCCC. Meanwhile, other countries are fighting to avoid any additional burden for monitoring and reporting under REDD+ programmes. "Deforestation is a major cause of biodiversity loss – it is also responsible for up to a fifth of global carbon emissions. It is extremely important that all nations recognize and work to better integrate REDD+'s massive biodiversity benefits," said Rolf Hogan. 

 For further information: Chris Chaplin, WWF-International, cchaplin@wwf.sg, Hyderabad: +91 96522 36722 or Singapore: +65-9826-3802 Aarti Khosla, WWF-India, akhosla@wwfindia.net, +91 98 1119 9288
Feed ItemWWF: Water quality in Mendalam River, Heart of Borneo, now has significantly improved
Analysis of hydrological monitoring activity by Equitable Payment for Watershed Services (EPWS) Program in West Kalimantan PONTIANAK (18/10) - The four years analysis on water quality of Mendalam River, Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan since 2009 until 2012, done by WWF-Indonesia West Kalimantan Program in collaboration with ICRAF, LIPI and PDAM Tirta Dharma (state tap-water company), showed a significant decrease in water turbidity and sediment concentration in Mendalam River. "This study showed a decrease in the average concentration of turbidity, from 13.2 NTU in July 2009 to 8.4 NTU (36.4%) in the measurement from June to July 2012. Trend of sediment concentration indicated a decrease approximately 41.6%, from 26.4 mg / liter (2009) to 15.4 mg / liter in 2012," said Iwan Ridwansyah, MSc, researcher from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI). "To address the quality problem of the river in West Kalimantan Province, WWF-Indonesia, CARE and IIED, supported by WWF Netherlands DGIS, started since 2006, have been working together through implementation of EPWS Program in Mendalam River, Kapuas Hulu," said M. Hermayani Putera, West Kalimantan Program Manager of WWF-Indonesia. Emanuel Haraan Ryanto, Director of PDAM Tirta Dharma Kapuas Hulu said that the study conducted in Mendalam River since 2007-2009 has informed that around 4-15 tons / year of sediment resulted from the river. At least 37 landslide areas with more than 100 meters depth occurred on the banks of the river, as well as more than 76 other landslide locations that are less than 100 meters. Forest cover in the Mendalam currently remains only about 40%. "The river supplies water for the PDAM Tirta Dharma in Putussibau. Turbidity of the water in this river is now reaching up to 16 NTU (Nephelometric Turbidity Unit), far above the minimal score for drinking water standards according to the regulation of the Indonesia Ministry of Health, which is 5 NTU. If this trend maintains, it will have an impact on improving the quality of tap water treatment, eventually processed tap water distributed by PDAM will be safe for consumption and meet the minimum standards set by the Ministry of Health. We thank you for the efforts made by the WWF to improve the environment, particularly in Mendalam sub-watershed. This will be very useful for people who use tap water," added Emanuel. During the implementation of EPWS program, restoration has been done in the area of landslides along the banks of the Mendalam River. Mapping of critical areas, planting 140,000 cultivated tree types such as cocoa, rubber (local and superior quality), and also other types of useful local plants such as belian, tengkawang and gaharu. Restoration covered 5 villages totalling approximately 212 hectares. In addition, the program also helps to improve the capacity of the community through several activities such as comparative study on rubber management to one state-owned plantation company in Indonesia (PTPN XIII) in Sintang, training for plantation (nursery to planting), training on measuring water discharge, water sampling, and measurement of the landslides volume. The program has also installed three units of automatic rain gauge and 2 units of automatic water level recorder. All activities of monitoring and assessment involved local communities in 5 villages on the banks of Mendalam River. Zainal AM, the Head Village of Nanga Sambus, said that people in Mendalam sub-watershed area have hope that the PES program can be successfully realised, which will motivate them to continue to maintaining the river quality, particularly Mendalam River, and can improve revenue of communities who lives near the river. "Let's protect together. If the people who live in the upper stream protect the area, this will yield good impact to people downstream. They will appreciate the restoration effort done by upper stream people," he added. "We welcome the cooperation of the parties in integrating the whole comprehensive aspects involving economic, environmental and social development in the development of the sub-watershed. Hopefully this can be an example for other regions, "said Drs. Suparman, Head of Kapuas Hulu Local Planning Agency. "With the decrease in water turbidity and sediment concentration, it has indicated that there is a positive impact of the activities carried out by EPWS Program in Mendalam River. To enhance the broader impacts, we recommend this work to be extended in two other rivers, the Sibau River and Kapuas River," said Hermayani. ---- end ---- For more information, please contact: WWF Indonesia Albertus Tjiu HP: 08125624019 Email: albertus@wwf.or.id   Puslit Limnologi-LIPI Iwan Ridwansyah, MSc. HP: 0816635801 Email: iwanridwansyah@gmail.com PDAM Tirta Dharma Kapuas Hulu Slamet Sugianto, Amd HP. 081257846888 Email: tirtauncakkapuas@yahoo.com Notes for Editors: Forest ecosystems provide a wide range of environmental services benefiting public. Services include the services of water, carbon, biodiversity and landscape beauty. Report of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) stated 60% of the world's ecosystem services have been degraded more rapidly than the ability to fix it. Particularly in Indonesia, with 62 watersheds covering an area of 18.5 million hectares, now are in critical condition. Conditions that cause a decrease in reserves of water resources, fluctuations in water discharge, as well as increasing the rate of sedimentation and erosion. The impact of these conditions will increase the cost of drinking water treatment and worsen the quality of water services and such a disadvantage for river transportation users. About EPWS Program In 2006, a partnership was established between the three international agencies to explore the business aspects of PWS (Payment for Watershed Services). The project is called "Equitable Payments for Watershed Services". Activities implemented through two phases. Phase I: Building the Business Case (2006 - 2009) Phase I goal is to prepare and build a real business case for buyers and sellers of PWS that are suitable for targeted project sites. This approach is essential to convince potential buyers and sellers that PWS mechanism that will be implemented is based on ecological and economical condition. At the end of Phase I, it is considered a successful business between buyers and sellers if agreement of cooperation in each location is signed. Activities in Phase I include baseline studies on: hydrology, institutions, livelihood and the business case (cost-benefit). Phase II: Implementing Equitable Payments for Watershed Services (2010 - present) Implementation phase will deal with relevant partners at the local, national and international, private sector, and government agencies. Expected result in Phase II is successful implementations of PWS mechanism in all targeted project locations, sustainable nature resource management, and improvement of community livelihoods. Activities in Phase II include restoration, Tembawang local tree enhancement and hydrology. WWF-Indonesia WWF is an independent global conservation organization, established in 1961 in Switzerland, with almost 5 million supporters and networks in more than 100 countries. WWF has been present in Indonesia since 1962 for one-horned rhinoceros project in Ujung Kulon, became a foundation in 1998 and present in more than 25 working areas in 17 provinces. WWF-Indonesia's mission is to save biodiversity and reduce the ecology impacts from human activities through: promoting strong conservation ethics, knowledge and conservation efforts in Indonesian people; facilitating multi-stakeholders efforts in biodiversity protection and ecological process at the eco-regional scale; policy advocacy, law enforcement to support conservation; and encouraging conservation for human welfare through sustainable utilization of natural resources. For further information, visit www.wwf.or.id or www.panda.org Heart of Borneo (HoB) The Heart of Borneo covers more than 22 million hectares (220,000 km2) of equatorial rainforest across the countries of Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia. One of Asia's last great rainforests, it includes some of the most biologically diverse habitats on earth, and is one of only two places on earth where elephants, orangutans, rhinoceros and clouded leopards share the same territory. In the past 15 years, more than 500 new flora or fauna species have been discovered, at a rate of more than three per month. Borneo's cultural diversity is as distinct and varied as the island's animal and plant life. In Kalimantan (Indonesia) alone, 142 different languages are believed still to be in use today. Many people depend directly on the forest for edible and medicinal plants; fish; meat; construction materials and water. As the headwaters of the island's major rivers lie in Borneo's central highlands, protection is critical to ensuring reliable clean water supplies to a large number of human settlements, and the thriving industries that have developed in coastal urban centres. Heart of Borneo Declaration In February 2007, the governments of Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia signed the Heart of Borneo Declaration to protect an area of more than 220,000 square kilometres in the centre of the island and bordering all three countries. Together they emphasised the fact that these tropical rainforests have strategic, global, national and local functions, not only for citizens of these three countries but for the global human race. The declaration is supported under important regional and international agreements such as Association of East Asian Nations (ASEAN), Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines East Asia Growth Area (BIMP-EAGA), Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC), and the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (UNCBD).   For more information visit: www.panda.org/heartofborneo
Feed ItemLaos pushes ahead with Mekong dam and risks destroying the region's lifeblood
Gland, Switzerland – The Lao government's determination to plow ahead with construction of the controversial US$3.5-billion Xayaburi hydropower dam in northern Laos puts the mighty Mekong River's spectacular biodiversity, rich fisheries and livelihoods - vital to nearly 60 million people - in grave danger, warns WWF. Despite fierce opposition from neighbouring countries, and some concerns raised this week by delegates attending the Asia-Europe Summit (ASEM 9) in the Lao capital, Vientiane, Laos' Deputy Minister of Energy and Mining, Mr Viraphonh Viravong, announced that Laos will hold a ground-breaking ceremony at the dam site on Wednesday, 7 November. Mr. Viravong also told a group of journalists, "It [Xayaburi dam] has been assessed, it has been discussed the last two years. We have addressed most of the concerns." Criticism of the Xayaburi project has been mounting over the past year, with concerns centred on the serious gaps in data and failures to fully account for the impacts of the dam, particularly concerning fisheries and sediment flows. "Laos appears to be recklessly intent on forging ahead with construction before the agreed impact studies have been completed," said Dr Li Lifeng, Director of WWF's Freshwater Programme. "If the region's governments fail now to reaffirm their concerns on Xayaburi, they risk resting the future of the Mekong on flawed analysis and gaps in critical data that could have dire consequences for millions of people living in the Mekong River basin." In June 2010, Thailand's electricity utility, EGAT, signed an initial agreement with Ch. Karnchang to purchase over 95 per cent of the Xayaburi dam's electricity, and at least four Thai banks have expressed their interest in providing loans to the project, despite the acute environmental and social costs, and the uncertainties surrounding the financial return of the project. "Thailand has a huge stake in the project and should not turn a blind eye to the potentially devastating consequences the project will wreak on their neighbours, and their own people," added Li. "Thailand must take responsibility and join calls to stop the dam construction and cancel its power purchase agreement until there is regional consensus to build the dam." Laos' actions fly in the face of the decision last December by Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam to delay building the dam on the Mekong mainstream pending further studies on the sustainable management of the Mekong River, including impacts from mainstream hydropower development projects. However, no timeline has yet been set for when the further studies will be completed. Fisheries and sediment impacts A recent review of the dam development identified uncertainties and weaknesses with the proposed fish passes, and confirmed the Xayaburi project will block part of the sediment flow and that important gaps in knowledge concerning the sediment aspects remain. The Lao government and Ch. Karnchang agreed to spend an additional US$100 million on modifications to the dam design in an attempt to mitigate the adverse impacts, but experts warn this will fail to solve the problems given the remaining gaps in key data and science, and the clear risks associated with using unproven technologies. "Laos expects its neighbours to trust that the clear risks associated with this project will somehow be resolved while construction moves ahead," added Li. "In pushing ahead with their Mekong dam experiment, Laos is jeopardizing the sustainability of one of the world's great river systems, and all future transboundary cooperation." An important precedent for 10 other dams As the first dam project to enter the Mekong River Commission's (MRC) formal consultation process, the Xayaburi project will set an important precedent for 10 other dams proposed for the lower mainstream of the river. "The Asia-Europe meeting brought together about 50 Asian and European leaders in Laos this week under an umbrella of "Friends for Peace, Partners for Prosperity." But few voices of concern were raised about a project set to spread instability throughout the region and undermine development goals. The international community must not remain silent on Xayaburi," added Li. WWF urges Mekong ministers to defer a decision on the dam for 10 years to ensure critical data can be gathered and a decision can be reached using sound science and analysis. WWF advises lower Mekong countries considering hydropower projects to prioritise dams on some Mekong tributaries that are easier to assess and are considered to have a much lower impact and risk. About the mighty Mekong TEDxWWF talk by WWF-Greater Mekong Interim Representative, Stuart Chapman, on hydropower development on the Mekong River.
Feed ItemTroubled times for endangered Yangtze finless porpoise
Wuhan, China - A research expedition underway on the Yangtze is looking to discover how many of the world's only freshwater finless porpoises can be found in the river - and how to save the remaining population from extinction.   The endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), which numbers less than 1,800 in the wild, lives mainly in the central and lower reaches of the 6300km Yangtze River and two large adjoining lakes, Dongting and Poyang. Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) and WWF, the expedition comes only six years after the Baiji dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer) - another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise - was declared functionally extinct after a similar Yangtze survey that also looked at porpoise numbers.   "We are not optimistic about the estimated results in the mainstream investigation at this moment," said Wang Ding general director of both the 2006 and 2012 investigations and Research Fellow at the IHB.  "But in addition to the numbers and distribution of the population of Yangtze finless porpoises, we will also investigate the fishery resources and water quality of the Yangtze River."   Estimates from the 2006 survey say that the finless porpoise is expected to decline to around 200 by 2035 - Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List - if no effective protection measures are taken. More recent estimates are even less optimistic, saying that the species could become extinct in 15 years if no action is taken. Recect survey finds stable population in some areas, sharp decline in others   A survey conducted in October 2012 in Dongting and Poyang lakes brought mixed news, with a sharp reduction in the Dongting population while Poyang Lake numbers were mostly stable.   "The initial findings from the 2012 survey in the two lakes show that there are around 450 finless porpoises in Poyang Lake, and 90 in Dongting Lake," said Wang Ding. "Compared with the survey results in 2006, the population in Dongting Lake has sharply declined, and their habitat has also shrunk. This shows their living conditions are getting worse and worse. "   The downturn in porpoise numbers is the result of many different factors including food shortages, accidents with boat engine propellers, pollution and electro-fisihing, where electrical currents are sent into the water to stun fish before they are caught. "As a symbol of the Yangtze ecosystem, the status of the finless porpoise is a reflection of the the health of the Yangtze River. It has already lost the Baiji dolphin, and cannot bear losing Yangtze finless porpoise!" said Wang Kexiong, Research Associate from the IHB. Protection plan Scientists at the Wuhan-based IHB are now formulating an action plan to help conserve the rare porpoise. In addition to existing calls for more research on artificial propagation, scientists and policymakers will integrate data gathered during the expedition and include it in the final plan.   "If we are going to save the Yangtze finless porpoise from the same fate as the Baiji, we must take immediate action to keep the Yangtze River and its lakes healthy," said Lei Gang, Director of WWF China's Freshwater Program. "This means better laws and enforcement - we need to see harmful fishing practices stop, sand dredging better controlled, and new reserves developed."  "But the Yangtze River isn't going to be problem-free overnight. So to ensure the finless porpoise survives, we will also need to better understand where the best places are for this ancient animal to live, and learn a lot more about artificial propagation," Lei Gang added.   The expedition will cover a 1,700km expanse of the Yangtze, taking researchers from Yichang to Shanghai and back again. Preliminary results will be announced from mid to late December, and the complete report will be released in March 2013. High notes: Chinese pop star Zhang Liangying   WWF's Yangtze finless porpoise conservation ambassador Zhang Liangying (Jane Zhang) showed her support before the expedition got underway at a Friday night concert in Shenzhen with a performace of the song "Grateful". Acknowledging that the porpoise is known for its mischievous smile, the pop star said the song will help "keep the smile on Yangtze finless porpoises' face" to a packed house.   The musician also said that the song will be presented to WWF, with all proceeds donated to Yangtze finless porpoise conservation.  "The Yangtze finless porpoise is the symbol of our mother river, the Yangtze River, and to protect them means to protect ourselves." said Jane Zhang. "WWF and the experts from the Institute of Hydrobiology have done a lot to protect Yangtze finless porpoise, and that is worth admiration. I hope that I will have the opportunity to visit Yangtze finless porpoise again in the Yangtze River, and do more for Yangtze finless porpoise, she added.   -ENDS- For more information please contact Zeng Ming, Head of Press, WWF China, mzeng@wwfchina.org, +86 10 6511 6298   Chris Chaplin, Media Relations Manager, WWF International, cchaplin@wwf.sg,  +86 139 117 474 72  
Feed ItemPlanet-friendly tomatoes
Pasta with tomato sauce – for many it's the taste of home, and the epitome of comfort food. Did you know that this worldwide favorite has a water footprint? Everything we eat does. And it's not just the water we use to cook in our home kitchens. It's the water used to grow the ingredients in the pasta and sauce we savor. WWF has helped Mutti, market leader in the production of tomato purée, pressed tomatoes and tomato pulp, calculate the water footprint of its production, from tomato cultivation to finished product. Mutti is the first Italian company, and one of the few in the world, to undertake such a study. "The world population has reached 7 billion, and our consumption habits are not sustainable," says Gianfranco Bologna, scientific director of WWF-Italy. "This is why WWF supports individual, institutional and business efforts to significantly reduce our footprint on natural systems. We are working to transform the markets, to minimize the impact of the products we enjoy and depend on." The calculation of water footprint for the whole production cycle considered the quantity of water contained in each Mutti product. The water footprint analysis has led Mutti to commit to reduce its water footprint by 3 per cent by 2015. Given that 83 per cent of Mutti's water footprint comes from the cultivation of tomatoes, the company is focusing most of its attention on its producers, with a campaign of awareness and support to improve efficiency of water use in cultivation. This year, thanks to the partnership with the WWF, 20 Mutti suppliers located throughout the Emilia Romagna region have tried an innovative method of irrigation management to limit of the use of water to volumes that are strictly necessary. A team of experts using probes and sensors to measure soil humidity has been able to quantify the minimum effective volume of irrigation water, thus guiding farmers toward an optimal use of resources. A water-savings of up to 30 per cent was shown in "guided" agricultural enterprises, compared with those "not guided". With the right guidelines, producers can easily analyze their own cultivation and irrigation practices to better manage water resources. "The water saving of 30 per cent as a result of simply optimizing field irrigation represents an important step toward achieving the ambitious objective, agreed upon in collaboration with WWF, of reducing the water footprint by 2015 throughout the Mutti business network, from the cultivation of tomatoes to the final product," said Francesco Mutti. As part of its annual Pomodorino d'Oro award for production of exceptional tomatoes, Mutti has introduced the Special Mention "Ideas for Water", to be given to farmers who are demonstrating innovation and commitment to sustainable cultivation. "Mutti is part of the vanguard of companies using water footprint as a tool to measure impact and set challenging reduction targets," said Stuart Orr, Freshwater Manager at WWF International. "It is an innovative project that has identified efficient solutions and shown how the agricultural sector can reduce its environmental impacts."
Feed ItemYangtze River expedition points to decline of endangered finless porpoise
Yichang, China -- Scientists from a research expedition that is looking to find out how many finless porpoises now live in the Yangtze have spotted 10 individuals in a 630km section of the river, fewer than detected in the area during a similar study six years ago. A combination of visual and sonar identification are being used to guarantee the independence and accuracy of the findings, according to the expedition team, which docked near the city of Yichang Monday afternoon. Initial results suggest a drop in the population of the world's only freshwater finless porpoise but the results are pending until late next month when the evaluation is finalized. "We have spotted 10 finless porpoises from Wuhan to Yichang, the first leg of the survey, mainly in the lower reaches of the Honghu section, upper reaches of the Dongting estuary, upper and lower reaches of the river near Jianli county and the section adjacent to Gong'an county, with few discoveries elsewhere," said Wang Kexiong, deputy head of the research expedition and an associate researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB). Shipping traffic, infrastructure to blame for population decline The Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), which numbers between 1,200 to 1,500 in the wild, lives mainly in the central and lower reaches of the 6300km Yangtze River and two large adjoining lakes, Dongting and Poyang. Estimates from the 2006 survey say that the finless porpoise is expected to decline to around 200 by 2035 - Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List – but more recent studies say that the species could become extinct in 15 years if nothing is done to protect them. Scientists on the expedition point to the growth of commercial shipping traffic and the construction of dams and other large-scale infrastructure projects as some of the major reasons behind the decline of the rare species. "In order to study human impacts on finless porpoises in a scientific and comprehensive manner, we will count the number of cargo and fishing ships in the Yangtze from Yichang to Shanghai to evaluate the pressure posed by shipping and fishery activities on the endangered species," said Zhang Xinqiao, expedition team member and WWF finless porpoise programme officer.  The expedition team, which first set sail on 11 November, is scheduled to depart Yichang for Wuhan on 20 November, travelling along the Yangtze through the provinces of Anhui, Jiangxi, and Jiangsu to Shanghai, wrapping up the voyage in late-December when the first research report is to be published. Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the IHB, WWF and Wuhan Baiji Dolphin Conservation Fund, the expedition comes only six years after the Baiji dolphin - another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise - was declared functionally extinct. "Statistics will be finalized after we take into consideration the validity of calculation, density of distribution, width of the river, sailing length and areas covered," said Wang Kexiong from the IHB.
Feed ItemTana River Delta Ramsar Site Status a Plus for Coastal East Africa
Conservation efforts by WWF and other environmental organizations have continued to forge ahead following Kenya designating the Tana River Delta as a Wetland of International Importance. With the Ramsar Secretariat's announcing that the Tana River Delta is now a Ramsar Site, the 163,600-hectare delta (02°27'S 040°17'E) becomes East Africa's second most important river mouth wetland after the Rufiji Delta in neighbouring Tanzania. Kenya already has 5 designated Ramsar sites in the Great African Rift Valley, namely lakes Naivasha, Elementaita, Nakuru, Bogoria, and Baringo; providing enhanced tourism, employment for Kenya's tourism sector, vibrant horticultural industry around Lake Naivasha, steam geysers in Lake Bogoria, and Kenya's first sanctuary for the critically endangered black rhino in Lake Nakuru National Park. In total, Kenya's 6 Ramsar Sites cover 265,449 hectares. The Tana Delta forms an area of rich biodiversity for sea species including fish and prawns, five species of marine turtles. There are a host of terrestrial animals such as the African Elephant, Tana Mangabey, Tana River Red Colobus, and White Collared monkey. In addition to more than 600 plant species, the Tana Delta is a home for many bird species and is a critical transit point for migratory water birds such as waders, gulls and terns. According to Coastal East Africa Initiative leader Peter Scheren, the importance of the Tana Delta to Coastal East Africa cannot be underscored enough considering the numerous challenges facing the region. "The Tana Delta is an important ecosystem for Coastal East Africa which continues to face several challenges. Statistics indicate that a mere 10% of the original coastal forests of Eastern Africa remain, fragmented into 400 patches that cover 6,250km² in Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique. The fact that the Tana Delta is now the latest Ramsar Site in Africa is a boost in efforts to conserve the remaining forest cover and help secure the livelihoods of communities' dependent upon this important ecosystem," noted Mr. Scheren Currently, over 20 million people live in and along coastal forests and landscapes in eastern Africa. The survival of these people is highly dependent on the availability of basic natural resources such as timber, wood-fuel and charcoal, which are extracted from forests, causing a serious dilemma; their dependency and consequent exploitation of these resources destroying the very basis of their existence. The pressures are rapidly rising as the population is expected to double by 2030 putting a serious and already present strain on the meager natural resources present in Coastal East Africa. WWF implements several conservation projects at the Kenyan coast including the rehabilitation and protection of the Kaya and Boni Dodori forests, the conservation of sea turtles and livelihood enhancing activities. By John Kabubu Communications Officer WWF Coastal East Africa Initiative
Feed ItemLegal decision gives a break for conservation of the Tapajos basin in the Brazilian Amazon
Debate over the construction of more dams in the Amazon heats up A decision from the Federal Justice in the Brazilian State of Para that denied a preliminary environmental license to the construction of the newest giant dam in the Brazilian Amazon, the hydropower project Sao Luiz do Tapajos, represents an important step in the growing debate around the stakes, need and urgency of implementing large infrastructure projects in one of the more pristine areas of the Brazilian Amazon, affecting traditional communities and indigenous people. The act, determined by Federal Judge José Airton de Aguiar Portela on November 19th, requires that an integrated environmental assessment to deal with cumulative social and environmental impacts be developed for the Tapajos and Jamanxin basins and that indigenous people living in the area be consulted. According to the Federal Attorney of the State of Para, who has asked for this decision, the construction will affect the Munduruku territory where over 10,000 indigenous people live. "The environmental assessments are very important and should be the result of detailed terms of reference as much as to the methodology, in order to enable a consistent study. More important is the implementation of the recommendations, as well as monitoring by society, "stated the WWF Brazil CEO, Maria Cecilia Wey de Brito. The Tapajos basin represents almost 6% of the Brazilian territory and contains unique ecological, scenic and cultural value. Nevertheless, this basin has been subject to hasty measures aimed to bypass environmental safeguards in order to speed up the construction of the Tapajos complex, a compilation of 7 proposed dams in the ecoregion. Of these proposed dams, the two largest are the Sao Luiz (6.133 MW) and Jatoba (2.336 MW). Among those measures, it is worth mentioning a government decision announced last January and later converted into law that reduces the protected status of four units of land set aside for conservation therefore allowing the massive undertaking of the Tapajos complex to proceed. By easing up on the law protecting these conservation areas, 2 more free-flowing rivers in the Amazon, the Tapajos and Jamanxin rivers, will be dammed, causing the flooding of an estimated 250,000 hectares and the fragmentation of ecosystems of social and ecological significance. According to that legal decision that establishes a limit to the careless project pace, "the public interest cannot ignore rules imposed by itself, even under supposedly urgent demands from the country". WWF has been advocating the development of an integrated regional planning system that supports a serious national debate over how Brazilians want to see the Amazon conserved in the future. The identification of specific rivers designated as "no-go rivers" must be agreed upon before the piling-up of impacts from numerous hydropower projects, treated in an isolated pattern, produce disproportional impacts at the basin scale. "With 150 dams in the Amazon horizon it is essential to define priority areas for fresh water conservation to guarantee the connectivity and integrity of the hydrological system, which represent the interest of life from those that depend on rivers that flow and pulse freely. And the tools to promote this national dialog are available", says Pedro Bara, infrastructure strategy leader of WWF Living Amazon initiative. (With information from Federal Justice of the Pará State)
Feed ItemShipping, overfishing pushing Yangtze finless porpoise towards extinction
Wuhan, China – The number of endangered finless porpoise spotted in an ongoing research expedition along the Wuhan-Yichang section of the Yangtze River has declined drastically with growing evidence pointing to impact of shipping and overfishing pushing the rare animal towards extinction, scientists on the expedition say.   The survey team has visually identified 39 individuals of the Yangtze finless porpoise – endangered on the IUCN Red List – during the 1,252km round-trip voyage on Wuhan-Yichang-Wuhan section of the river. "Based on visual and sonar identification, the number of the Yangtze finless porpoises we've spotted is about one-third of the detected in the area during a similar study six years ago," said Wang Kexiong, deputy head of the research expedition and an associate researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB). Most of the 39 finless porpoises were spotted in the waters close to the Yanshou Dam, near the city of Yichang, Gong'an county, Chenglingji and Luoshan.  The distribution became concentrated and its location moved up stream compared to results in 2006, when the majority of discoveries were made across a wider area. "The changes could be attributed to the comparatively gentle flow and rich fishery resources in waters near Yanshou Dam and Gong'an," said Wang.  The Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), which numbers between 1,200 to 1,500 in the wild, lives mainly in the central and lower reaches of the 6300km Yangtze River and two large adjoining lakes, Dongting and Poyang. Recent studies say that the species could become extinct in 15 years if nothing is done to protect them. The expedition team is due to depart Wednesday for Shanghai before heading back to Wuhan late next month when the initial results of the research are expected to be announced.  Calculation of the number of cargo and fishing ships in the Yangtze started from Yichang onward to evaluate the pressure posed by shipping and fishery activities on the endangered species. "Shipping traffic and fishing activities can cast an influence on the survival of the Yangtze finless porpoises. The relatively concentrated distribution and fixed location could possibly result from excessively busy shipping traffic in certain sections of the river that may have severed route of communication of the porpoises," said Zhang Xinqiao, expedition team member and WWF finless porpoise programme officer.  For instance, in the waters off Shijitou in Xianning and Hannan district of Wuhan that have the busiest traffic of fishing and cargo shipping so far, little traces of porpoises were detected, said Zhang.  A total of 80 fishery boats and 697 cargo ships were counted by the team from Yichang-Wuhan. Twenty-seven cargo ships were calculated within 30 minutes in the waters off the Hannan district of Wuhan, while the number in Shijitou stood at six.  Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the IHB, WWF and Wuhan Baiji Dolphin Conservation Fund, the expedition commenced on November 11 and comes only six years after the Baiji dolphin - another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise - was declared functionally extinct. For more information please contact: Qiu Wei, Senior Communications Officer, WWF China, wqiu@wwfchina.org, +86 10 6511 6272
Feed ItemIn the Mekong, science &#8211; not guesswork &#8211; must prevail &#3610;&#3607;&#3610;&#3634;&#3607;&#3586;&#3629;&#3591;&#3652;&#3607;&#3618; &#3585;&#3633;&#3610;&#3629;&#3609;&#3634;&#3588;&#3605;&#3610;&#3609;&#3648;&#3626;&#3657;&#3609;&#3604;&#3657;&#3634;&#3618;&#3586;&#3629;&#3591;&#3649;&#3617;&#3656;&#3609;&#3657;&#3635;&#3650;&#3586;&#3591;
บทบาทของไทย กับอนาคตบนเส้นด้ายของแม่น้ำโขง - จิม ลิป ผู้อำนวยการใหญ่ WWF เขียนจดหมายเปิดผนึกทวงถามรัฐบาลในภูมิภาคลุ่มน้ำโขง รวมทั้งผู้นำทางฝั่งยุโรปและอเมริกาที่เงียบเฉยต่อโครงการก่อสร้างเขื่อนไซยะบุรี ที่รัฐบาลลาวประกาศเดินหน้าเต็มตัวเมื่อต้นเดือนพ.ย.ที่ผ่านมา จิมบอกว่าเดิมพันครั้งนี้คืออนาคตของคนในลุ่มน้ำโขงตอนล่างราว60ล้านคน ซึ่งร้อยละ80 พึ่งพาทรัพยากรธรรมชาติโดยตรงจากสายเลือดหลักเส้นนี้ หากเขื่อนไซยะบุรีสร้างได้ เขื่อนที่อยู่ในแผนอีกกว่า 10 แห่งก็อาจจะเกิดขึ้นตามมา และนั่นจะส่งผลกระทบอย่างใหญ่หลวงต่อความมั่งคงด้านอาหารและวิถีชีวิตของผู้คนในภูมิภาค เขื่อนไซยะบุรีเป็นบททดสอบสำคัญถึงหัวใจของ 'การพัฒนาอย่างยั่งยืน' ที่่บรรดารัฐบาลและองค์กรที่สนับสนุนการพัฒนาพร่ำพูดถึง ประเทศในลุ่มน้ำโขงตอนล่างมีโอกาสที่จะพิสูจน์แนวคิดดังกล่าวโดยการพิจารณาอย่างรอบคอบถึงสมดุลระหว่างความมั่งคงด้านอาหาร น้ำ และพลังงาน ที่ไม่จำเป็นต้องคุกคามทำลายระบบนิเวศที่เป็นรากฐานสำคัญของทุกสิ่ง ประเทศไทยในฐานะผู้นำในภูมิภาคมีบทบาทสำคัญยิ่งต่อการพัฒนาโครงการเขื่อนไซยะบุรี เพราะประเทศไทยเป็นผู้รับซื้อไฟฟ้าหลัก และธนาคารของไทยอย่างน้อยสี่แห่งยังแสดงเจตจำนงค์ที่จะสนับสนุนเงินกู้ให้โครงการก่อสร้างเขื่อนไซยะบุรี แม้อาจจะมีผลกระทบด้านสังคมและสิ่งแวดล้อมที่สูงมาก WWF ขอเรียกร้องให้ประเทศไทยแสดงบทบาทที่ชัดเจนและรับผิดชอบต่อการพัฒนาพลังงานในลุ่มน้ำโขงตอนล่าง โดยการยกเลิกข้อตกลงท่ีจะรับซื้อพลังงานจากโครงการจนกว่าโครงการนี้จะได้รับการเห็นชอบจากคณะกรรมาธิการแม่น้ำโขง และขอเรียกร้องให้ธนาคารในประเทศไทยล้มเลิกเจตนารมณ์ที่จะให้เงินกู้กับโครงการที่ยังเป็นที่ถกเถียงอย่างกว้างขวาง ----- The Xayaburi dam would be the first dam on the lower Mekong mainstream, and could well open the way for 10 more dams currently proposed. It threatens economic development prospects and basic food security for 60 million people, 80 percent of whom depend directly on the river for their food and livelihoods. WWF International Director General Jim Leape With the livelihoods of 60 million people on the line, science – not guesswork – must prevail. On November 7, the government of Laos held a ground-breaking ceremony to launch construction of the Xayaburi dam. If built, this massive dam would be the first dam on the lower Mekong mainstream, and could well open the way for 10 more dams currently proposed. It threatens economic development prospects and basic food security for 60 million people, 80 percent of whom depend directly on the river for their food and livelihoods. The fish that migrate up and down the free-flowing lower Mekong are the principal source of protein for those 60 million people, and are the basis for a fishing industry with an estimated value as high as $7.6 billion annually. And the river's natural flooding cycles feed agriculture that brings in another $4.6 billion. So the stakes are high. The governments of Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam have acknowledged the need for additional research into the unique functioning of the lower Mekong. In December 2011, the Mekong River Commission agreed to conduct further studies on the effects of the Xayaburi dam and 10 other proposed mainstream dams. To date, no studies have been conducted, leaving significant questions unanswered about how mainstream dams will affect migratory fish populations and the flow of sediment that nourishes farmland downstream. These are not merely questions for biologists and hydrologists. They are questions for ministers of agriculture, health and finance. They are questions for banks and donors, including Australia, the European Union and the US, which have invested an estimated $1 billion in development aid in Laos and downstream countries over the past 25 years. Economic growth gained at the expense of food security is no development victory. The curious lack of opposition to the Xayaburi dam at the recent Asia-Europe Meeting or the East Asia Summit could be read as tacit support for the project. This would call into question European and U.S. rhetoric about sustainable development. Support, whether tacit or explicit, for a project this risky and blatantly shortsighted is incompatible with an agenda that promotes food security, economic opportunity, energy access and a stable climate. Indeed, the Xayaburi dam is a crucial test case. Are recent discussions about the trade-offs required to achieve food, water and energy security just talk? Or are governments and investors willing to go beyond buzzwords like "nexus thinking" where it truly matters? The nations of the lower Mekong have an opportunity to turn concept into reality by taking a balanced approach to meeting food, water and energy needs, while conserving the natural resources that underpin all of these. As a regional leader, Thailand also plays an important role. Thailand is slated to be the prime consumer of the electricity produced, and at least four Thai banks have expressed their interest in providing loans to the project, despite the acute environmental and social costs, and the uncertainties surrounding the financial return of the project. WWF calls on Thailand to act responsibly and cancel its power purchase agreement until there is regional consensus on dams. On complex issues of conservation and poverty-reduction, "clearly right" answers are rare. This is one of the few instances when all the governments and scientists have agreed: It's too risky to build a dam across the lower Mekong. There's too much we don't know, and the stakes are too high. If the project goes ahead, the history of the lower Mekong will be divided into before and after Xayaburi. This will set the precedent, making it harder to oppose the 10 additional proposed dams. How many times must we look back in hindsight before we understand the magnitude and permanence of such decisions? The groundbreaking ceremony at Xayaburi might make the dam seem like a fait accompli. On the contrary. There is still time to reconsider. There are options to develop hydropower along Mekong tributaries – options that research shows would have far less impact on migratory fish, and therefore food security and livelihoods. Let's listen to the science and chart a sustainable path for development along the lower Mekong.
Feed ItemYangtze finless porpoise population declines
Wuhan, China -- A total of 380 Yangtze finless porpoise have been visually identified during a survey expedition along the Yangtze River, marking a significant decline from a previous research in 2006, according to initial results. Meanwhile, acoustic equipment identified 172 finless porpoise during the expedition. "There is a notable downtrend in the population size of the finless porpoise based on our observation," said Wang Kexiong, deputy head of the research expedition and an associate researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB). Two survey ships docked at IHB's wharf in Wuhan of Hubei on Monday, concluding a 44-day and 3,400km round-trip voyage between the Chinese cities of Yichang and Shanghai.   Results of the expedition, including the population of the finless porpoise in the Yangtze River, are to be made available in about two months after sufficient analysis, said Wang. "Compared with the 2006 survey, the distribution areas of finless porpoise remains roughly the same, with signs of scattering in some parts," said Wang. There are fewer finless porpoise in the mainstream of the Yangtze while more discoveries have been made in wharf and port areas. "That could be attributed to rich fish bait resources there. Busy shipping traffic in the mainstream, especially in port regions, poses a threat to the survival of finless porpoise," said Wang. Shipping traffic in the mainstream of Yangtze River -- the lower reaches in particular – has increased considerably, with an average of 100 cargo ships per hour passing through. Rates were even higher in the Zhenjiang-Jiangyin section of the Yangtze, with an average of 105 cargo ships passing every half hour. "Such shipping traffic volumes would become a potential threat to the finless porpoise who rely on their sonar system to survive," said Zhang Xinqiao, expedition team member and WWF finless porpoise programme officer. The team encountered 9,643 cargo ships and 736 fishery ships during voyage, which ran from 11 November – 23 December 2012.  . Researchers found dense distributions of finless porpoise in waters that are not open to navigation, such as the Jiajiang River, and attribute this to less human disturbance. Less optimistic was the discovery of illegal fishing practices in these areas, including traps that could affect finless porpoise.   . "Generally, the finless porpoise are scattered in the Yangtze mainstream, with a small group of them living in a comparatively narrow area. Such an isolation is not necessarily a positive thing for their reproduction," cautioned Wang. The scattered distribution pattern could be the result of shipping traffic that made migration harder, projects that altered hydrological conditions in the middle and lower reaches and habit loss, said Wang. The findings on the number of population and variation trend are to be finalized according to a model that takes validity of calculation, density of distribution, width of the river, sailing length and areas covered into consideration. The results are to contribute to the drafting of Action Plan for the Yangtze Finless Porpoise Conservation by the Ministry of Agriculture and proposals concerning the conservation areas. Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the IHB, WWF and Wuhan Baiji Dolphin Conservation Fund, the expedition first set sail on 11 November and comes only six years after the Baiji dolphin - another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise - was declared functionally extinct. For further information: Qiu Wei, Senior Communications Officer, WWF China, wqiu@wwfchina.org, +86 10 6511 6272 
Feed ItemDrava-Mura confluence will remain unspoilt
Zagreb, Croatia – A highly controversial river regulation project that would have turned the Drava-Mura confluence on the Hungarian-Croatian border into little more than a lifeless canal, has been rejected by the Croatian Ministry of Environment and Nature Protection. This important step comes after four years of campaigning against the project by WWF, EuroNatur and the Drava League. The demise of the project would in effect protect the core zone of the recently designated Croatian-Hungarian part of the future 5-country UNESCO Biosphere reserve "Mura-Drava-Danube". The Mura-Drava confluence has some of Europe's best preserved wetlands and is home to endangered species such as the White-tailed eagle, Black stork and Otter. All species rely on the natural shifting of the riverbeds as well as on habitats such as floodplain forests, sand and gravel banks. In October, a comprehensive monitoring report issued by the European Commission on Croatia's state of preparedness for EU membership detected significant gaps in the implementation of EU environmental law. In particular, the report criticized the insufficient quality of Environmental Impact Assessment studies (EIAs) and found that they were not in line with EU standards. WWF, EuroNatur and Croatian NGOs had repeatedly warned that more than 500 kilometres of Croatia's natural rivers are at risk of being turned into canals. They had argued that the EIA's did not assess the projects' environmental impact properly and the projects contradicted EU law. Nevertheless, five out of seven projects had already gained approval by the Croatian Ministry of Environment and Nature Protection. Still pending a decision is the regulation of 53 kilometres of the Danube River in the transboundary area of Croatia and Serbia. "The ministerial decision against the destruction of the Drava-Mura confluence is an important signal for the better protection of unique natural areas in Croatia", said Arno Mohl, International Freshwater Officer at WWF. "We trust that Minister Zmajlović will now also stop the rest of the projects". Croatia's unique rivers provide free ecosystem services like flood protection, water purification and climate change mitigation and, hence, are of extreme importance for the wellbeing of people. Straightening and channelling the natural river would massively harm the already vulnerable river landscapes and lead to irreversible loss of nature and wildlife.
Feed ItemRegional cooperation on Mekong River in tatters
Gland, Switzerland – Ministers from Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam meeting next week in the Lao city of Luang Prabang must put derailed decision-making on Mekong River mainstream dams back on track or risk sabotaging management of one of the world's great rivers, warns WWF. Environment and water ministers had agreed in 2011 to delay a decision on building the US$3.5-billion Xayaburi dam pending further studies on its environmental impacts. This agreement was swept aside last November when Laos decided to forge ahead with construction of the controversial dam . The 16-17 January Ministerial-level meeting of the Mekong River Commission (MRC) – an inter-governmental agency made up of representatives from the four lower Mekong countries – will put transboundary cooperation to the test and the fate of the Mekong River, vital to the livelihoods of 60 million people. "The Xayaburi dam experiment threatens the health and productivity of the Mekong River and Delta, and could leave millions of people facing critical food insecurity," said Dr. Jian-hua Meng, WWF's Sustainable Hydropower Specialist. "Ministers must take a stand against Xayaburi-style diplomacy or it will be the dangerous precedent for the future." Xayaburi dam is a crucial test case As the first dam to enter the MRC's consultation process, the Xayaburi project is a crucial test case for 10 other dams proposed for the lower mainstream of the river. The MRC process requires countries to jointly review development projects proposed for the Mekong mainstream with an aim to reach consensus on whether or not they should proceed. Laos is now constructing Xayaburi dam without consensus among its neighbours or notifying the MRC. In November last year, the MRC delivered the much anticipated concept note for a joint study aimed at filling critical data gaps and guiding sustainable development of the Mekong River, including mainstream hydropower projects. The study was requested by Ministers at the 2011 MRC meeting. "Without the results of the study, dam development on the lower Mekong mainstream is now largely guesswork," added Dr. Meng. "A fix it as you go approach with Xayaburi dam, and throwing money at problems as they inevitably arise, is not sound engineering nor smart development." Thai banks back dam despite severe risks Thailand is slated to be the prime consumer of the electricity produced by Xayaburi dam, and at least four Thai banks have confirmed their interest in financing the project, despite the acute environmental and social costs, and the uncertainties surrounding the financial return of the project. "Thailand must act responsibly and cancel its premature power purchase agreement until there is regional consensus on dams," added Dr. Meng. "And if the Thai banks do their risk assessment homework well, and value their international reputation and financial returns, they'd do well to reconsider and to pull out of this project." WWF urges Mekong ministers to defer a decision on the dam for 10 years to ensure critical data can be gathered and a decision can be reached using sound science and analysis. Future of MRC hangs in the balance "If decision-making continues to occur outside of the MRC, the institution will soon lose its legitimacy and US$300 million of international donor support to the Commission will be wasted," added Dr. Meng. "Mekong countries need to stop wasting time picking apart the MRC process, and start using common sense and sound science again to reach joint decisions that are to the benefit of all." Reviews of the dam development have identified serious gaps in data and weaknesses with the proposed fish passes for the mega dam, and confirmed the Xayaburi project will block part of the sediment flow, destabilising the river's ecosystem upon which farmers, fishers and many other economic sectors depend. WWF advises lower Mekong countries considering hydropower projects to prioritise dams on some Mekong tributaries that are easier to assess and are considered to have a much lower impact and risk. About the mighty Mekong TEDxWWF talk by WWF-Greater Mekong Interim Representative, Stuart Chapman, on hydropower development on the Mekong River.
Feed ItemGlobal fashion company H&M tackles business and environmental risk with cutting-edge water strategy
Stockholm — Fashion retailer H&M says its new water strategy will minimize water impacts throughout its operations and supply chain, and create positive change in key river basins with major garment production. The strategy was created in partnership with conservation organization WWF, which will work with H&M to implement it over the next three years. "Water is a key resource for H&M, and we are committed to ensuring water is used responsibly throughout our value chain. We do this to minimize risks in our operations, protect the environment and secure availability of water for present and future generations. We are proud of the partnership with WWF, which we hope will inspire others to follow," says Karl-Johan Persson, CEO of H&M. During 2012, WWF and H&M performed a comprehensive evaluation of all H&M's efforts and challenges related to water. These include agricultural production of fibers, as well as dyeing and washing processes. The review guided development of the new H&M water strategy, which WWF and H&M will implement together starting this year. According to WWF, no other fashion company has such a comprehensive global water strategy. "This partnership marks an evolution in the corporate approach to water. H&M understands that its long-term success depends on access to adequate water supplies. It also understands that its social license to operate depends on being a good neighbour and good steward of shared resources. H&M's water strategy is an integral part of its business plan. We hope other companies will be inspired to take the same approach," says Jim Leape, Director General of WWF International. To embed sustainability from the beginning, H&M designers and buyers will receive additional training on water impacts of raw material production, as well as wet processes for different styles. H&M will also improve its internal water efficiency, minimize its suppliers' impact on water, and educate staff and customers about water issues. WWF and H&M will work in collaboration with policymakers, NGOs, water institutions and other companies to support better management of particular river basins in China and Bangladesh – key production hubs for the company. In addition, H&M will support WWF freshwater conservation projects in the Yangtze river basin in China. Currently, 2.7 billion people – roughly 40 per cent of the world's population – live in river basins that experience severe water scarcity during at least one month of the year, according to WWF's 2012 Living Planet Report. About a third of the factories that make clothes for H&M using wet processes are already located in extreme water scarce areas, or will be by 2025. This partnership builds on 10 years of H&M's work to reduce negative water impacts in different parts of the value chain.
Feed ItemBolivia designates world's largest protected wetland
Trinidad, Bolivia — To mark the annual World Wetlands Day, the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance has designated the Bolivian Llanos De Moxos wetland its largest site ever. At more than 6.9 million hectares, the site is equivalent to the size of the Netherlands and Belgium together, and is prized for its rich natural diversity, as well as cultural value. "WWF applauds the government of Bolivia for taking bold action to protect these vital ecosystems," said Jim Leape, WWF International Director General. "The Amazon basin, covering nine countries, supports native species and the millions of people who live there – and plays an essential role in regulating the climate we all depend on. Healthy wetlands support the proper functioning of the whole Amazon ," Leape added. The Llanos de Moxos, located near the borders of Bolivia, Peru and Brazil, consists of tropical savannas with cyclical droughts and floods. These wetlands are especially prized for their rich natural diversity: 131 species of mammals have been identified to date, 568 different birds, 102 reptiles, 62 amphibians, 625 fish and at least 1,000 plant species. Several species – including the giant otter and the Bolivian river dolphin – have been identified as vulnerable, endangered or at critical risk of extinction. The region is traversed by three major rivers, the Beni in the west, the Iténez or Guaporé to the east, and the Mamoré in the central region. These rivers converge to form the Madeira River, the major southern tributary of the Amazon River. The Llanos de Moxos wetlands are important to avoid floods, maintain minimum flows in the rivers during the dry season and regulate the region's hydrological cycle. The area is sparsely populated, comprising seven indigenous territories and eight protected areas. Peasant communities and private properties also exist in the region, both mainly dedicated to farming. The region was inhabited by pre-Columbian cultures from 800 B.C. to 1200 A.D. These together formed the "Moxos water-based cultures" typified by the clever use of hydraulic infrastructure for water management of the vast territory covered by the llanos, or plains, which sustained intensive agricultural production on which these ancient peoples survived. The Bolivian Government Commitment "We recognize the significant role of these wetlands in the conservation of Mother Earth, as well as the importance of the declaration confirming the Llanos de Moxos as internationally protected wetlands. We are proud to confirm to the world that the government of Bolivia is committed, in collaboration with social actors, to assuming the preservation of these areas as evidence of our efforts to achieve development for all our citizens," stated Juan Pablo Cardozo Arnez, Bolivian Deputy Minister for the Environment. "This is an important step as we continue to forge a truly harmonious relationship between our peoples and Mother Earth," Arnez added. The Deputy Minister went on to say: "Echoing the words of our President Evo Morales, we call upon all countries to incorporate [environmental] rights into their legislation and to comply with existing international agreements in this respect, so that human beings can begin to live in complete harmony and equilibrium with Mother Earth." Ramsar Convention The Convention on Wetlands of International Importance is an intergovernmental treaty, signed by 160 countries in 1971 in the Iranian city of Ramsar. The Ramsar Convention's mission is the conservation and wise use of wetlands, with the goal of achieving sustainable development. The designation of Llanos de Moxos is the product of a cooperative effort led by the government of of Beni Department, and Bolivia's Environment and Water Ministry and Vice-Ministry of the Environment. WWF did the technical studies under the Ramsar Convention framework to qualify for designation as a wetland of international importance. Bolivia acceded to the Ramsar Convention in 1990 and ratified it on 7 May 2002. It has eight other Ramsar sites: Los Lípez in south western Potosi Department; Lake Titicaca (La Paz Department), the Taczara basin in Tarija Department, Lakes Poopó and Uru Uru (Oruro Department), the Bolivian Pantanal, the Izozog Marshes and the Parapetí River in Santa Cruz de la Sierra. "The Moxos' declaration is a victory for wetlands conservation in the Amazon region. It will help protect different ecosystems and landscapes, guarantee a balanced provision of goods and services for Amazonian inhabitants and secure the future of this rich but fragile area," said Luis Pabón, WWF-Bolivia Country Director. "But most important is the challenge the Bolivian government and society are assuming, committing to protect the Llanos de Moxos in the long term. This declaration is clear evidence of how, here in Latin America and especially in Bolivia, supporting government conservation processes and policies can lead to important achievements," he added.
Feed ItemRare turtle sets Japanese precedent
Japan is asking the world's governments to help protect the Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle, a rare turtle found on only three small islands in the Okinawa group. The turtle was proposed by the Japanese Government for listing in Appendix II of CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, following the discovery of it on the international trade scene in mainland China, Hong Kong and online. It is the first time Japan has submitted a proposal to CITES, which is currently meeting in Bangkok, Thailand. At home, under Japanese law, the Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle is designated as a "natural monument" and cannot be captured, transferred or traded without permission from the Commissioner for Cultural Affairs. But the appearance of the species in the pet trade outside Japan strongly suggests illegal activity is taking place. Governments at CITES chose to accept the Japanese listing proposal, which will see this unique turtle gain better protection against illegal international trade. #cites Japan asks world's govts to protect rare Ryukyu Black-breasted Leaf #Turtle . First +ve ask fr Japan at Cites traffic.org/home/2013/3/8/... — Damian Carrington (@dpcarrington) March 8, 2013 The proposal arose after TRAFFIC market surveys raised the alarm following the discovery of small numbers of protected Japanese reptiles in the Asian pet trade. They included 31 Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtles in two shops in Hong Kong, while two further shops plus one in neighbouring Guangzhou, southern China, told TRAFFIC that they received orders for the species. TRAFFIC has released a new report at CITES, Trade in Japanese Endemic Reptiles in China and Recommendations for Species Conservation, recommending that the Japanese government propose the listing of the turtle. "The proposal to list the Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle is a small but significant step for Japan," said Kahoru Kanari, Senior Programme Officer with TRAFFIC and an author of the report. "We hope it signals Japan's intention to place more importance on the conservation of wild species found in international trade." In total 11 proposals were submitted to CITES for listings of freshwater turtles from around the world.
Feed ItemWWF exposes seven sins of dam building
Gland/Berlin - On World Water Day, WWF criticizes dam projects worldwide that continue to violate fundamental sustainability criteria. In the WWF report, "Seven Sins of Dam Building," numerous dam projects under construction or planned are given a failing review by the conservation organization. Aside from the internationally controversial Belo Monte (Brazil) and Xayaburi (Laos) dams, European projects, such as in Austria and Turkey, are also on the list.. The 'seven sins' outlined in the report include issues with dam location, neglecting biodiversity, environmental flows, social and economic factors, and risk analysis. WWF also notes that dam decisions often blindly follow "a bias to build" without considering better, cheaper, and less damaging alternatives. "Properly planned, built, and operated dams can contribute to food and energy security. Unfortunately, short-term interests are too often the focus of decision-making," says Dr. Jian-hua Meng, Water Security Specialist for WWF. "In order to guarantee acceptable levels of social and environmental sustainability, dam installations and operations should be stringently checked against sustainability criteria as formulated under the World Commission on Dams or the Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Protocol. If necessary, insufficiently performing projects must be modified or halted," added Meng. No sustainable outcomes can be expected when dam proponents rely on superior financial strength and political connections rather than on dialogue, transparency, and reason, says WWF. Additionally, some governments lack the capacity or independence to protect public interests. Successful and overall long-term beneficial dam projects need more than just the legal regulator's approval, according to the report. "For large-scale projects, operators must also obtain the 'social license to operate'. Acceptance of the project by the population is fundamental to sustainable management," says Meng. "Negative effects, such as relocation, destruction of cultural sites, or the collapse of local fisheries are still too often dismissed as somebody else's problem." Scientific evidence and risk assessments too frequently lose out to one-sided political or economic agendas, according to the report. Subsequently, dams are still planned and built in ecologically high value areas and biodiversity loss is still too often not accounted for. Serious impacts, caused by a change in the natural water flow dynamics or the disappearance of wetlands, are still not given consideration. Moreover, the size of a dam is not necessarily a deciding factor. Though numerous mega-projects can be found in the report's case studies, the cumulative impact of many small hydro projects, like for instance in Romania, cannot be underestimated. The problems are not limited to developing and emerging countries. G7 companies and engineers continue to not only push projects forward in emerging markets that are unacceptable by global standards, but also in the heart of the EU and North America, reproaches WWF. For example, heavy ecological deterioration looms for three alpine valleys in the Ötztal Alps in Austria, if the extension of the Kaunertal hydroelectric power plants is implemented with the current plans, the report cites. "WWF reviewed nine dams and we found that many projects commit not just one, but many grave sins of dam building. However, these errors are avoidable. Lack of capacity, economic pressure, or specific regional circumstances can no longer be presented as excuses," Meng stated.
Feed ItemYangtze finless porpoise population nosedives to 1,000
Wuhan, China -- The Yangtze finless porpoise population has declined to a mere 1,000 individuals, making the endangered species even more rare than the wild giant panda, the 2012 Yangtze Freshwater Dolphin Survey Report reveals.

 The population in the mainstream of the Yangtze River was less than half of what a similar survey found six years ago, with food shortages and human disturbance such as increased shipping traffic major threats to their survival. The study also found that the rare species annual rate of decline now stands at 13.7 percent, which means that the Yangtze finless porpoise could be extinct as early as the year 2025. The report comes after a 44-day and 3,400-kilometer round-trip research expedition on the Yangtze River between Yichang in Hubei Province and Shanghai. Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, WWF and the Wuhan Baiji Dolphin Conservation Fund, the expedition first set sail on 11 November 2012.

 The crew visually identified 380 individual Yangtze finless porpoise in the river's mainstream during the 2012 survey. Based on this observation, scientists determined through analyses that the population in the Yangtze mainstream is about 500, down from 1,225 in 2006.
 In October 2012, research was carried out in two adjoining lakes, the Poyang and Dongting, where the population was about 450 and 90, respectively, according to the report.

In a sharp contrast, 851 individuals of Yangtze finless porpoise were visually identified in the mainstream of the Yangtze during the 2006 survey. That research, however, did not cover the two lakes.
 "The species is moving fast toward its extinction," said Wang Ding, head of the research expedition and a professor at the IHB.

Attempts to find traces of the Baiji Dolphin, another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise, failed during the 2012 survey. The Baiji dolphin was declared "functionally extinct." According to data captured by acoustic equipment onboard the observation ships, the largest numbers of finless porpoise were found in the river sections east of Wuhan, with 67 percent recorded between Hukou in Jiangxi Province and Nanjing in Jiangsu Province, the report shows.

 There is a notable sign of scattered distribution pattern which could be the result of "shipping traffic that made migration harder, projects that altered hydrological conditions in the middle and lower reaches and habitat loss," said Wang with the IHB.

 The report also cautions that small groups of Yangtze finless porpoise living in comparative isolation may have a negative impact on their ability to reproduce.
 There are fewer finless porpoise in the mainstream of the Yangtze while more discoveries were made in wharf and port areas, scientists found.

 "They may risk their lives for rich fish bait resources there. But busy shipping traffic close to the port areas poses a threat to the survival of finless porpoise," said Wang.

 "Lack of fishery resources and human disturbances including shipping traffic are among the key threats to the Yangtze finless porpoise survival," Lei Gang, director of freshwater programme at WWF-China, said.
 Researchers found dense distributions of finless porpoise in waters that are not open to navigation and attribute this to less human disturbance. Less optimistic was the discovery of illegal fishing practices in these areas, including traps that could affect finless porpoise.

 A set of enhanced measures that include in-situ conservation and ex-situ conservation approaches are essential for efforts of saving the species from its distinction, said Lei.

Given that, the report calls for all-year-round fishing ban for all river dolphin reserves, establishment of a national reserve in Poyang Lake and ex-situ conservation reserves along the Yangtze. For further information: Qiu Wei, WWF China, +86 10 6511 6272, WQiu@wwfchina.org
Feed ItemProtection of bird colonies takes flight with creation of three Ramsar wetlands
Ruse, Bulgaria – The environmental ministers of Bulgaria and Romania officially signed a proposal to create three new transboundary wetland complexes along the Danube River prepared by WWF late last year. The new sites will later be considered and approved by the Secretariat of the Ramsar Convention on the Conservation of Wetlands. "The new transboundary wetland complexes – Srebarna-Lake Calarasi, Belene Islands Complex-Suhaia and Ibisha Island-Bistret – will allow for the full protection of the bird colonies that nest and feed in Bulgaria and Romania. The two countries will be able to take coordinated, cooperative measures to better protect wetlands and migratory species, which feed, winter, nest and breed on both sides of the river," said Laurice Ereifej, head of WWF Central and Eastern Europe Freshwater Programme. Monitoring done by WWF in the last three years shows that heron colonies that nest on the Bulgarian island of Ibisha feed in the Romanian lake of Bistret. The same goes for pygmy cormorants and pelicans nesting in the Srebarna Lake in Bulgaria that feed in the Romanian lake of Calarasi. "The two countries can work on a joint strategy for wetland management that will allow for the full protection of the bird species. Bulgaria and Romania can take coordinated measures by executing common bans on logging and hunting in the region and by not allowing access to the bird colonies during breeding," said Ivan Hristov, head of Freshwater for WWF-Bulgaria. At the end of 2012, WWF launched a study of Bistret, Suhaia, Calarasi, Srebarna, Ibisha and Belene Islands Complex as part of the Green Borders LIFE+ EU-funded project to propose transboundary conservation measures for bird species and to designate cross-border nature reserves along the Lower Danube. Wetlands include rivers, lakes, ponds and floodplain forests, among others. They are among the most valuable ecosystems as they preserve a huge amount of biodiversity and ensure ecosystem services for humans. Wetlands play a key role in the water cycle, restore water supplies, can reduce floods, provide habitat for fish and purify surface or groundwater. In the last century, the majority of wetlands in Bulgaria and Romania have been destroyed. Their protection is a priority for WWF. The Convention on the Conservation of Wetlands was signed on 2 February 1971 in the Iranian city of Ramsar. It is the first international agreement for the protection and sustainable use of natural resources. The mission of the Ramsar Convention is the conservation and wise use of all wetlands through local, regional and national actions and international cooperation, as a contribution to sustainable development.
Feed ItemMore than 3 million hectares of elephant, gorilla habitat get new protection
Gland, Switzerland — More than 3 million hectares of newly designated Ramsar sites in the Republic of Congo will provide vital habitat to endangered species and support the livelihoods of surrounding communities. Congo now counts 10 Wetlands of International Importance, totalling 11.7 million hectares.  Anada Tiega, Secretary General of the International Convention on Wetlands, congratulated the Republic of Congo for this major conservation milestone achieved with WWF's support. Tiega said these new designations come at an opportune time, as nations meet in Hyderabad, India, to shore up commitments to protecting biological diversity. "During the last meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity, the 193 member nations set a target to protect at least 17 per cent of their terrestrial and inland water ecosystems by 2020. This move by the Republic of Congo demonstrates how protecting wetlands through Ramsar can help countries meet their commitments," said Tiega. The new sites harbour a wealth of plant and animal species, including several IUCN Red-Listed species such as hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), African elephant (Loxodonta africana), western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes). They are also home to hundreds of fish species, which are both a source of nutrition and income for surrounding communities. The marshes, ponds, lakes and flooded forests are part of the migration path of more than 200 species of bird. The sites are: •Odzala Kokoua: 1,300,000ha, West Basin Division •Ntokou Pikounda: 427,200ha, Sangha Basin Division •Vallée du Niari: 1,581,000ha, South of the Republic of Congo Protecting habitat for charismatic species could enhance tourism opportunities in the Republic of Congo, with potential economic, environmental and social benefits. Sustainable tourism practiced in and around wetlands can contribute to poverty alleviation through the improvement of livelihoods, regional and national economies and support to local cultures. For further information: Gretchen Lyons, Conservation Communications Manager, glyons@wwfint.org +41 79 916 0136 About WWF WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the Earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption. panda.org/news for latest news and media resources About Ramsar The Convention on Wetlands – called the "Ramsar Convention" – is an intergovernmental treaty that embodies the commitments of its member countries to maintain the ecological character of their wetlands of International Importance and to plan for the "wise use", or sustainable use, of all of the wetlands in their territories. Ramsar.org
Feed ItemWWF: Agreement on finance key to success at Hyderabad biodiversity meet
Hyderabad, India  - The first week of negotiations at the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Hyderabad closed with governments from developed and developing nations locked in difficult discussions on critical issues including setting clear finance targets, conserving valuable ocean areas and its relationship with the UN climate convention, the UNFCCC. 

 Summarizing the key challenges facing the CBD in the week ahead, WWF International's Coordinator for Biodiversity Policy Rolf Hogan said: "So far, the biggest hurdle we've seen emerge are differences of opinion between developed and developing nations on finance issues. Developed countries do not want to commit more money to reach resource mobilization targets, and developing countries are saying that if no money is made available, then they will 'walk away' from their Nagoya commitments." "We need countries to agree on how to increase financing for biodiversity. This means agreeing to increasing public biodiversity funding by 20% as well as increasing national budgets and developing new and additional financing mechanisms that can support the achievement of the 20 Targets of the CBD's masterplan up to 2020."

 "We also need to engage the private sector and ensure development and foreign direct investments do not destroy biodiversity." "An agreement on finance is the key to success of COP 11. The stakes are high: if counties don't find a way to move beyond the hurdles they encountered in the first week, it could derail the commitments made in Nagoya two years ago." 

 Encouraging signs
 "In spite of the challenges in some areas, WWF is encouraged to see signs of progress, and believes that success can still be attained if nations step up to match the level of ambition we saw two years ago in Nagoya." "There are also positive signs that many countries, including emerging economies, will commit to new funding, but only if other nations reciprocate."   "It is important for Parties to get things right at Hyderabad. Success here means a clear path forward to the 2020 Aichi Targets."

 Conserving ocean biodiversity 

 Negotiations on protecting important ocean areas are also facing difficulties, with a block of nations opposing the 'endorsement' of reports that identify important areas for conservation in ocean areas beyond national jurisdictions. "Over 50 percent of the world's oceans fall outside of national boundaries. WWF encourages delegates to commit to clearly identifying ocean areas of value that fall beyond national jurisdictions," said Nanie Ratsifandrihamanana, Conservation Director of WWF Madagascar. 

 "Establishing marine protected areas are part of the broader package of solutions that can help governments and businesses safeguard our oceans' enormous ecological, social, and economic benefits," she added. 

Climate and REDD+

 Negotiations on REDD+ are becoming root bound with some countries pushing to maintain a clear separation between the CBD and UNFCCC. Meanwhile, other countries are fighting to avoid any additional burden for monitoring and reporting under REDD+ programmes. "Deforestation is a major cause of biodiversity loss – it is also responsible for up to a fifth of global carbon emissions. It is extremely important that all nations recognize and work to better integrate REDD+'s massive biodiversity benefits," said Rolf Hogan. 

 For further information: Chris Chaplin, WWF-International, cchaplin@wwf.sg, Hyderabad: +91 96522 36722 or Singapore: +65-9826-3802 Aarti Khosla, WWF-India, akhosla@wwfindia.net, +91 98 1119 9288
Feed ItemWWF: Water quality in Mendalam River, Heart of Borneo, now has significantly improved
Analysis of hydrological monitoring activity by Equitable Payment for Watershed Services (EPWS) Program in West Kalimantan PONTIANAK (18/10) - The four years analysis on water quality of Mendalam River, Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan since 2009 until 2012, done by WWF-Indonesia West Kalimantan Program in collaboration with ICRAF, LIPI and PDAM Tirta Dharma (state tap-water company), showed a significant decrease in water turbidity and sediment concentration in Mendalam River. "This study showed a decrease in the average concentration of turbidity, from 13.2 NTU in July 2009 to 8.4 NTU (36.4%) in the measurement from June to July 2012. Trend of sediment concentration indicated a decrease approximately 41.6%, from 26.4 mg / liter (2009) to 15.4 mg / liter in 2012," said Iwan Ridwansyah, MSc, researcher from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI). "To address the quality problem of the river in West Kalimantan Province, WWF-Indonesia, CARE and IIED, supported by WWF Netherlands DGIS, started since 2006, have been working together through implementation of EPWS Program in Mendalam River, Kapuas Hulu," said M. Hermayani Putera, West Kalimantan Program Manager of WWF-Indonesia. Emanuel Haraan Ryanto, Director of PDAM Tirta Dharma Kapuas Hulu said that the study conducted in Mendalam River since 2007-2009 has informed that around 4-15 tons / year of sediment resulted from the river. At least 37 landslide areas with more than 100 meters depth occurred on the banks of the river, as well as more than 76 other landslide locations that are less than 100 meters. Forest cover in the Mendalam currently remains only about 40%. "The river supplies water for the PDAM Tirta Dharma in Putussibau. Turbidity of the water in this river is now reaching up to 16 NTU (Nephelometric Turbidity Unit), far above the minimal score for drinking water standards according to the regulation of the Indonesia Ministry of Health, which is 5 NTU. If this trend maintains, it will have an impact on improving the quality of tap water treatment, eventually processed tap water distributed by PDAM will be safe for consumption and meet the minimum standards set by the Ministry of Health. We thank you for the efforts made by the WWF to improve the environment, particularly in Mendalam sub-watershed. This will be very useful for people who use tap water," added Emanuel. During the implementation of EPWS program, restoration has been done in the area of landslides along the banks of the Mendalam River. Mapping of critical areas, planting 140,000 cultivated tree types such as cocoa, rubber (local and superior quality), and also other types of useful local plants such as belian, tengkawang and gaharu. Restoration covered 5 villages totalling approximately 212 hectares. In addition, the program also helps to improve the capacity of the community through several activities such as comparative study on rubber management to one state-owned plantation company in Indonesia (PTPN XIII) in Sintang, training for plantation (nursery to planting), training on measuring water discharge, water sampling, and measurement of the landslides volume. The program has also installed three units of automatic rain gauge and 2 units of automatic water level recorder. All activities of monitoring and assessment involved local communities in 5 villages on the banks of Mendalam River. Zainal AM, the Head Village of Nanga Sambus, said that people in Mendalam sub-watershed area have hope that the PES program can be successfully realised, which will motivate them to continue to maintaining the river quality, particularly Mendalam River, and can improve revenue of communities who lives near the river. "Let's protect together. If the people who live in the upper stream protect the area, this will yield good impact to people downstream. They will appreciate the restoration effort done by upper stream people," he added. "We welcome the cooperation of the parties in integrating the whole comprehensive aspects involving economic, environmental and social development in the development of the sub-watershed. Hopefully this can be an example for other regions, "said Drs. Suparman, Head of Kapuas Hulu Local Planning Agency. "With the decrease in water turbidity and sediment concentration, it has indicated that there is a positive impact of the activities carried out by EPWS Program in Mendalam River. To enhance the broader impacts, we recommend this work to be extended in two other rivers, the Sibau River and Kapuas River," said Hermayani. ---- end ---- For more information, please contact: WWF Indonesia Albertus Tjiu HP: 08125624019 Email: albertus@wwf.or.id   Puslit Limnologi-LIPI Iwan Ridwansyah, MSc. HP: 0816635801 Email: iwanridwansyah@gmail.com PDAM Tirta Dharma Kapuas Hulu Slamet Sugianto, Amd HP. 081257846888 Email: tirtauncakkapuas@yahoo.com Notes for Editors: Forest ecosystems provide a wide range of environmental services benefiting public. Services include the services of water, carbon, biodiversity and landscape beauty. Report of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) stated 60% of the world's ecosystem services have been degraded more rapidly than the ability to fix it. Particularly in Indonesia, with 62 watersheds covering an area of 18.5 million hectares, now are in critical condition. Conditions that cause a decrease in reserves of water resources, fluctuations in water discharge, as well as increasing the rate of sedimentation and erosion. The impact of these conditions will increase the cost of drinking water treatment and worsen the quality of water services and such a disadvantage for river transportation users. About EPWS Program In 2006, a partnership was established between the three international agencies to explore the business aspects of PWS (Payment for Watershed Services). The project is called "Equitable Payments for Watershed Services". Activities implemented through two phases. Phase I: Building the Business Case (2006 - 2009) Phase I goal is to prepare and build a real business case for buyers and sellers of PWS that are suitable for targeted project sites. This approach is essential to convince potential buyers and sellers that PWS mechanism that will be implemented is based on ecological and economical condition. At the end of Phase I, it is considered a successful business between buyers and sellers if agreement of cooperation in each location is signed. Activities in Phase I include baseline studies on: hydrology, institutions, livelihood and the business case (cost-benefit). Phase II: Implementing Equitable Payments for Watershed Services (2010 - present) Implementation phase will deal with relevant partners at the local, national and international, private sector, and government agencies. Expected result in Phase II is successful implementations of PWS mechanism in all targeted project locations, sustainable nature resource management, and improvement of community livelihoods. Activities in Phase II include restoration, Tembawang local tree enhancement and hydrology. WWF-Indonesia WWF is an independent global conservation organization, established in 1961 in Switzerland, with almost 5 million supporters and networks in more than 100 countries. WWF has been present in Indonesia since 1962 for one-horned rhinoceros project in Ujung Kulon, became a foundation in 1998 and present in more than 25 working areas in 17 provinces. WWF-Indonesia's mission is to save biodiversity and reduce the ecology impacts from human activities through: promoting strong conservation ethics, knowledge and conservation efforts in Indonesian people; facilitating multi-stakeholders efforts in biodiversity protection and ecological process at the eco-regional scale; policy advocacy, law enforcement to support conservation; and encouraging conservation for human welfare through sustainable utilization of natural resources. For further information, visit www.wwf.or.id or www.panda.org Heart of Borneo (HoB) The Heart of Borneo covers more than 22 million hectares (220,000 km2) of equatorial rainforest across the countries of Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia. One of Asia's last great rainforests, it includes some of the most biologically diverse habitats on earth, and is one of only two places on earth where elephants, orangutans, rhinoceros and clouded leopards share the same territory. In the past 15 years, more than 500 new flora or fauna species have been discovered, at a rate of more than three per month. Borneo's cultural diversity is as distinct and varied as the island's animal and plant life. In Kalimantan (Indonesia) alone, 142 different languages are believed still to be in use today. Many people depend directly on the forest for edible and medicinal plants; fish; meat; construction materials and water. As the headwaters of the island's major rivers lie in Borneo's central highlands, protection is critical to ensuring reliable clean water supplies to a large number of human settlements, and the thriving industries that have developed in coastal urban centres. Heart of Borneo Declaration In February 2007, the governments of Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia signed the Heart of Borneo Declaration to protect an area of more than 220,000 square kilometres in the centre of the island and bordering all three countries. Together they emphasised the fact that these tropical rainforests have strategic, global, national and local functions, not only for citizens of these three countries but for the global human race. The declaration is supported under important regional and international agreements such as Association of East Asian Nations (ASEAN), Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines East Asia Growth Area (BIMP-EAGA), Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC), and the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (UNCBD).   For more information visit: www.panda.org/heartofborneo
Feed ItemLaos pushes ahead with Mekong dam and risks destroying the region's lifeblood
Gland, Switzerland – The Lao government's determination to plow ahead with construction of the controversial US$3.5-billion Xayaburi hydropower dam in northern Laos puts the mighty Mekong River's spectacular biodiversity, rich fisheries and livelihoods - vital to nearly 60 million people - in grave danger, warns WWF. Despite fierce opposition from neighbouring countries, and some concerns raised this week by delegates attending the Asia-Europe Summit (ASEM 9) in the Lao capital, Vientiane, Laos' Deputy Minister of Energy and Mining, Mr Viraphonh Viravong, announced that Laos will hold a ground-breaking ceremony at the dam site on Wednesday, 7 November. Mr. Viravong also told a group of journalists, "It [Xayaburi dam] has been assessed, it has been discussed the last two years. We have addressed most of the concerns." Criticism of the Xayaburi project has been mounting over the past year, with concerns centred on the serious gaps in data and failures to fully account for the impacts of the dam, particularly concerning fisheries and sediment flows. "Laos appears to be recklessly intent on forging ahead with construction before the agreed impact studies have been completed," said Dr Li Lifeng, Director of WWF's Freshwater Programme. "If the region's governments fail now to reaffirm their concerns on Xayaburi, they risk resting the future of the Mekong on flawed analysis and gaps in critical data that could have dire consequences for millions of people living in the Mekong River basin." In June 2010, Thailand's electricity utility, EGAT, signed an initial agreement with Ch. Karnchang to purchase over 95 per cent of the Xayaburi dam's electricity, and at least four Thai banks have expressed their interest in providing loans to the project, despite the acute environmental and social costs, and the uncertainties surrounding the financial return of the project. "Thailand has a huge stake in the project and should not turn a blind eye to the potentially devastating consequences the project will wreak on their neighbours, and their own people," added Li. "Thailand must take responsibility and join calls to stop the dam construction and cancel its power purchase agreement until there is regional consensus to build the dam." Laos' actions fly in the face of the decision last December by Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam to delay building the dam on the Mekong mainstream pending further studies on the sustainable management of the Mekong River, including impacts from mainstream hydropower development projects. However, no timeline has yet been set for when the further studies will be completed. Fisheries and sediment impacts A recent review of the dam development identified uncertainties and weaknesses with the proposed fish passes, and confirmed the Xayaburi project will block part of the sediment flow and that important gaps in knowledge concerning the sediment aspects remain. The Lao government and Ch. Karnchang agreed to spend an additional US$100 million on modifications to the dam design in an attempt to mitigate the adverse impacts, but experts warn this will fail to solve the problems given the remaining gaps in key data and science, and the clear risks associated with using unproven technologies. "Laos expects its neighbours to trust that the clear risks associated with this project will somehow be resolved while construction moves ahead," added Li. "In pushing ahead with their Mekong dam experiment, Laos is jeopardizing the sustainability of one of the world's great river systems, and all future transboundary cooperation." An important precedent for 10 other dams As the first dam project to enter the Mekong River Commission's (MRC) formal consultation process, the Xayaburi project will set an important precedent for 10 other dams proposed for the lower mainstream of the river. "The Asia-Europe meeting brought together about 50 Asian and European leaders in Laos this week under an umbrella of "Friends for Peace, Partners for Prosperity." But few voices of concern were raised about a project set to spread instability throughout the region and undermine development goals. The international community must not remain silent on Xayaburi," added Li. WWF urges Mekong ministers to defer a decision on the dam for 10 years to ensure critical data can be gathered and a decision can be reached using sound science and analysis. WWF advises lower Mekong countries considering hydropower projects to prioritise dams on some Mekong tributaries that are easier to assess and are considered to have a much lower impact and risk. About the mighty Mekong TEDxWWF talk by WWF-Greater Mekong Interim Representative, Stuart Chapman, on hydropower development on the Mekong River.
Feed ItemTroubled times for endangered Yangtze finless porpoise
Wuhan, China - A research expedition underway on the Yangtze is looking to discover how many of the world's only freshwater finless porpoises can be found in the river - and how to save the remaining population from extinction.   The endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), which numbers less than 1,800 in the wild, lives mainly in the central and lower reaches of the 6300km Yangtze River and two large adjoining lakes, Dongting and Poyang. Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) and WWF, the expedition comes only six years after the Baiji dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer) - another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise - was declared functionally extinct after a similar Yangtze survey that also looked at porpoise numbers.   "We are not optimistic about the estimated results in the mainstream investigation at this moment," said Wang Ding general director of both the 2006 and 2012 investigations and Research Fellow at the IHB.  "But in addition to the numbers and distribution of the population of Yangtze finless porpoises, we will also investigate the fishery resources and water quality of the Yangtze River."   Estimates from the 2006 survey say that the finless porpoise is expected to decline to around 200 by 2035 - Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List - if no effective protection measures are taken. More recent estimates are even less optimistic, saying that the species could become extinct in 15 years if no action is taken. Recect survey finds stable population in some areas, sharp decline in others   A survey conducted in October 2012 in Dongting and Poyang lakes brought mixed news, with a sharp reduction in the Dongting population while Poyang Lake numbers were mostly stable.   "The initial findings from the 2012 survey in the two lakes show that there are around 450 finless porpoises in Poyang Lake, and 90 in Dongting Lake," said Wang Ding. "Compared with the survey results in 2006, the population in Dongting Lake has sharply declined, and their habitat has also shrunk. This shows their living conditions are getting worse and worse. "   The downturn in porpoise numbers is the result of many different factors including food shortages, accidents with boat engine propellers, pollution and electro-fisihing, where electrical currents are sent into the water to stun fish before they are caught. "As a symbol of the Yangtze ecosystem, the status of the finless porpoise is a reflection of the the health of the Yangtze River. It has already lost the Baiji dolphin, and cannot bear losing Yangtze finless porpoise!" said Wang Kexiong, Research Associate from the IHB. Protection plan Scientists at the Wuhan-based IHB are now formulating an action plan to help conserve the rare porpoise. In addition to existing calls for more research on artificial propagation, scientists and policymakers will integrate data gathered during the expedition and include it in the final plan.   "If we are going to save the Yangtze finless porpoise from the same fate as the Baiji, we must take immediate action to keep the Yangtze River and its lakes healthy," said Lei Gang, Director of WWF China's Freshwater Program. "This means better laws and enforcement - we need to see harmful fishing practices stop, sand dredging better controlled, and new reserves developed."  "But the Yangtze River isn't going to be problem-free overnight. So to ensure the finless porpoise survives, we will also need to better understand where the best places are for this ancient animal to live, and learn a lot more about artificial propagation," Lei Gang added.   The expedition will cover a 1,700km expanse of the Yangtze, taking researchers from Yichang to Shanghai and back again. Preliminary results will be announced from mid to late December, and the complete report will be released in March 2013. High notes: Chinese pop star Zhang Liangying   WWF's Yangtze finless porpoise conservation ambassador Zhang Liangying (Jane Zhang) showed her support before the expedition got underway at a Friday night concert in Shenzhen with a performace of the song "Grateful". Acknowledging that the porpoise is known for its mischievous smile, the pop star said the song will help "keep the smile on Yangtze finless porpoises' face" to a packed house.   The musician also said that the song will be presented to WWF, with all proceeds donated to Yangtze finless porpoise conservation.  "The Yangtze finless porpoise is the symbol of our mother river, the Yangtze River, and to protect them means to protect ourselves." said Jane Zhang. "WWF and the experts from the Institute of Hydrobiology have done a lot to protect Yangtze finless porpoise, and that is worth admiration. I hope that I will have the opportunity to visit Yangtze finless porpoise again in the Yangtze River, and do more for Yangtze finless porpoise, she added.   -ENDS- For more information please contact Zeng Ming, Head of Press, WWF China, mzeng@wwfchina.org, +86 10 6511 6298   Chris Chaplin, Media Relations Manager, WWF International, cchaplin@wwf.sg,  +86 139 117 474 72  
Feed ItemPlanet-friendly tomatoes
Pasta with tomato sauce – for many it's the taste of home, and the epitome of comfort food. Did you know that this worldwide favorite has a water footprint? Everything we eat does. And it's not just the water we use to cook in our home kitchens. It's the water used to grow the ingredients in the pasta and sauce we savor. WWF has helped Mutti, market leader in the production of tomato purée, pressed tomatoes and tomato pulp, calculate the water footprint of its production, from tomato cultivation to finished product. Mutti is the first Italian company, and one of the few in the world, to undertake such a study. "The world population has reached 7 billion, and our consumption habits are not sustainable," says Gianfranco Bologna, scientific director of WWF-Italy. "This is why WWF supports individual, institutional and business efforts to significantly reduce our footprint on natural systems. We are working to transform the markets, to minimize the impact of the products we enjoy and depend on." The calculation of water footprint for the whole production cycle considered the quantity of water contained in each Mutti product. The water footprint analysis has led Mutti to commit to reduce its water footprint by 3 per cent by 2015. Given that 83 per cent of Mutti's water footprint comes from the cultivation of tomatoes, the company is focusing most of its attention on its producers, with a campaign of awareness and support to improve efficiency of water use in cultivation. This year, thanks to the partnership with the WWF, 20 Mutti suppliers located throughout the Emilia Romagna region have tried an innovative method of irrigation management to limit of the use of water to volumes that are strictly necessary. A team of experts using probes and sensors to measure soil humidity has been able to quantify the minimum effective volume of irrigation water, thus guiding farmers toward an optimal use of resources. A water-savings of up to 30 per cent was shown in "guided" agricultural enterprises, compared with those "not guided". With the right guidelines, producers can easily analyze their own cultivation and irrigation practices to better manage water resources. "The water saving of 30 per cent as a result of simply optimizing field irrigation represents an important step toward achieving the ambitious objective, agreed upon in collaboration with WWF, of reducing the water footprint by 2015 throughout the Mutti business network, from the cultivation of tomatoes to the final product," said Francesco Mutti. As part of its annual Pomodorino d'Oro award for production of exceptional tomatoes, Mutti has introduced the Special Mention "Ideas for Water", to be given to farmers who are demonstrating innovation and commitment to sustainable cultivation. "Mutti is part of the vanguard of companies using water footprint as a tool to measure impact and set challenging reduction targets," said Stuart Orr, Freshwater Manager at WWF International. "It is an innovative project that has identified efficient solutions and shown how the agricultural sector can reduce its environmental impacts."
Feed ItemYangtze River expedition points to decline of endangered finless porpoise
Yichang, China -- Scientists from a research expedition that is looking to find out how many finless porpoises now live in the Yangtze have spotted 10 individuals in a 630km section of the river, fewer than detected in the area during a similar study six years ago. A combination of visual and sonar identification are being used to guarantee the independence and accuracy of the findings, according to the expedition team, which docked near the city of Yichang Monday afternoon. Initial results suggest a drop in the population of the world's only freshwater finless porpoise but the results are pending until late next month when the evaluation is finalized. "We have spotted 10 finless porpoises from Wuhan to Yichang, the first leg of the survey, mainly in the lower reaches of the Honghu section, upper reaches of the Dongting estuary, upper and lower reaches of the river near Jianli county and the section adjacent to Gong'an county, with few discoveries elsewhere," said Wang Kexiong, deputy head of the research expedition and an associate researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB). Shipping traffic, infrastructure to blame for population decline The Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), which numbers between 1,200 to 1,500 in the wild, lives mainly in the central and lower reaches of the 6300km Yangtze River and two large adjoining lakes, Dongting and Poyang. Estimates from the 2006 survey say that the finless porpoise is expected to decline to around 200 by 2035 - Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List – but more recent studies say that the species could become extinct in 15 years if nothing is done to protect them. Scientists on the expedition point to the growth of commercial shipping traffic and the construction of dams and other large-scale infrastructure projects as some of the major reasons behind the decline of the rare species. "In order to study human impacts on finless porpoises in a scientific and comprehensive manner, we will count the number of cargo and fishing ships in the Yangtze from Yichang to Shanghai to evaluate the pressure posed by shipping and fishery activities on the endangered species," said Zhang Xinqiao, expedition team member and WWF finless porpoise programme officer.  The expedition team, which first set sail on 11 November, is scheduled to depart Yichang for Wuhan on 20 November, travelling along the Yangtze through the provinces of Anhui, Jiangxi, and Jiangsu to Shanghai, wrapping up the voyage in late-December when the first research report is to be published. Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the IHB, WWF and Wuhan Baiji Dolphin Conservation Fund, the expedition comes only six years after the Baiji dolphin - another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise - was declared functionally extinct. "Statistics will be finalized after we take into consideration the validity of calculation, density of distribution, width of the river, sailing length and areas covered," said Wang Kexiong from the IHB.
Feed ItemTana River Delta Ramsar Site Status a Plus for Coastal East Africa
Conservation efforts by WWF and other environmental organizations have continued to forge ahead following Kenya designating the Tana River Delta as a Wetland of International Importance. With the Ramsar Secretariat's announcing that the Tana River Delta is now a Ramsar Site, the 163,600-hectare delta (02°27'S 040°17'E) becomes East Africa's second most important river mouth wetland after the Rufiji Delta in neighbouring Tanzania. Kenya already has 5 designated Ramsar sites in the Great African Rift Valley, namely lakes Naivasha, Elementaita, Nakuru, Bogoria, and Baringo; providing enhanced tourism, employment for Kenya's tourism sector, vibrant horticultural industry around Lake Naivasha, steam geysers in Lake Bogoria, and Kenya's first sanctuary for the critically endangered black rhino in Lake Nakuru National Park. In total, Kenya's 6 Ramsar Sites cover 265,449 hectares. The Tana Delta forms an area of rich biodiversity for sea species including fish and prawns, five species of marine turtles. There are a host of terrestrial animals such as the African Elephant, Tana Mangabey, Tana River Red Colobus, and White Collared monkey. In addition to more than 600 plant species, the Tana Delta is a home for many bird species and is a critical transit point for migratory water birds such as waders, gulls and terns. According to Coastal East Africa Initiative leader Peter Scheren, the importance of the Tana Delta to Coastal East Africa cannot be underscored enough considering the numerous challenges facing the region. "The Tana Delta is an important ecosystem for Coastal East Africa which continues to face several challenges. Statistics indicate that a mere 10% of the original coastal forests of Eastern Africa remain, fragmented into 400 patches that cover 6,250km² in Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique. The fact that the Tana Delta is now the latest Ramsar Site in Africa is a boost in efforts to conserve the remaining forest cover and help secure the livelihoods of communities' dependent upon this important ecosystem," noted Mr. Scheren Currently, over 20 million people live in and along coastal forests and landscapes in eastern Africa. The survival of these people is highly dependent on the availability of basic natural resources such as timber, wood-fuel and charcoal, which are extracted from forests, causing a serious dilemma; their dependency and consequent exploitation of these resources destroying the very basis of their existence. The pressures are rapidly rising as the population is expected to double by 2030 putting a serious and already present strain on the meager natural resources present in Coastal East Africa. WWF implements several conservation projects at the Kenyan coast including the rehabilitation and protection of the Kaya and Boni Dodori forests, the conservation of sea turtles and livelihood enhancing activities. By John Kabubu Communications Officer WWF Coastal East Africa Initiative
Feed ItemLegal decision gives a break for conservation of the Tapajos basin in the Brazilian Amazon
Debate over the construction of more dams in the Amazon heats up A decision from the Federal Justice in the Brazilian State of Para that denied a preliminary environmental license to the construction of the newest giant dam in the Brazilian Amazon, the hydropower project Sao Luiz do Tapajos, represents an important step in the growing debate around the stakes, need and urgency of implementing large infrastructure projects in one of the more pristine areas of the Brazilian Amazon, affecting traditional communities and indigenous people. The act, determined by Federal Judge José Airton de Aguiar Portela on November 19th, requires that an integrated environmental assessment to deal with cumulative social and environmental impacts be developed for the Tapajos and Jamanxin basins and that indigenous people living in the area be consulted. According to the Federal Attorney of the State of Para, who has asked for this decision, the construction will affect the Munduruku territory where over 10,000 indigenous people live. "The environmental assessments are very important and should be the result of detailed terms of reference as much as to the methodology, in order to enable a consistent study. More important is the implementation of the recommendations, as well as monitoring by society, "stated the WWF Brazil CEO, Maria Cecilia Wey de Brito. The Tapajos basin represents almost 6% of the Brazilian territory and contains unique ecological, scenic and cultural value. Nevertheless, this basin has been subject to hasty measures aimed to bypass environmental safeguards in order to speed up the construction of the Tapajos complex, a compilation of 7 proposed dams in the ecoregion. Of these proposed dams, the two largest are the Sao Luiz (6.133 MW) and Jatoba (2.336 MW). Among those measures, it is worth mentioning a government decision announced last January and later converted into law that reduces the protected status of four units of land set aside for conservation therefore allowing the massive undertaking of the Tapajos complex to proceed. By easing up on the law protecting these conservation areas, 2 more free-flowing rivers in the Amazon, the Tapajos and Jamanxin rivers, will be dammed, causing the flooding of an estimated 250,000 hectares and the fragmentation of ecosystems of social and ecological significance. According to that legal decision that establishes a limit to the careless project pace, "the public interest cannot ignore rules imposed by itself, even under supposedly urgent demands from the country". WWF has been advocating the development of an integrated regional planning system that supports a serious national debate over how Brazilians want to see the Amazon conserved in the future. The identification of specific rivers designated as "no-go rivers" must be agreed upon before the piling-up of impacts from numerous hydropower projects, treated in an isolated pattern, produce disproportional impacts at the basin scale. "With 150 dams in the Amazon horizon it is essential to define priority areas for fresh water conservation to guarantee the connectivity and integrity of the hydrological system, which represent the interest of life from those that depend on rivers that flow and pulse freely. And the tools to promote this national dialog are available", says Pedro Bara, infrastructure strategy leader of WWF Living Amazon initiative. (With information from Federal Justice of the Pará State)
Feed ItemShipping, overfishing pushing Yangtze finless porpoise towards extinction
Wuhan, China – The number of endangered finless porpoise spotted in an ongoing research expedition along the Wuhan-Yichang section of the Yangtze River has declined drastically with growing evidence pointing to impact of shipping and overfishing pushing the rare animal towards extinction, scientists on the expedition say.   The survey team has visually identified 39 individuals of the Yangtze finless porpoise – endangered on the IUCN Red List – during the 1,252km round-trip voyage on Wuhan-Yichang-Wuhan section of the river. "Based on visual and sonar identification, the number of the Yangtze finless porpoises we've spotted is about one-third of the detected in the area during a similar study six years ago," said Wang Kexiong, deputy head of the research expedition and an associate researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB). Most of the 39 finless porpoises were spotted in the waters close to the Yanshou Dam, near the city of Yichang, Gong'an county, Chenglingji and Luoshan.  The distribution became concentrated and its location moved up stream compared to results in 2006, when the majority of discoveries were made across a wider area. "The changes could be attributed to the comparatively gentle flow and rich fishery resources in waters near Yanshou Dam and Gong'an," said Wang.  The Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), which numbers between 1,200 to 1,500 in the wild, lives mainly in the central and lower reaches of the 6300km Yangtze River and two large adjoining lakes, Dongting and Poyang. Recent studies say that the species could become extinct in 15 years if nothing is done to protect them. The expedition team is due to depart Wednesday for Shanghai before heading back to Wuhan late next month when the initial results of the research are expected to be announced.  Calculation of the number of cargo and fishing ships in the Yangtze started from Yichang onward to evaluate the pressure posed by shipping and fishery activities on the endangered species. "Shipping traffic and fishing activities can cast an influence on the survival of the Yangtze finless porpoises. The relatively concentrated distribution and fixed location could possibly result from excessively busy shipping traffic in certain sections of the river that may have severed route of communication of the porpoises," said Zhang Xinqiao, expedition team member and WWF finless porpoise programme officer.  For instance, in the waters off Shijitou in Xianning and Hannan district of Wuhan that have the busiest traffic of fishing and cargo shipping so far, little traces of porpoises were detected, said Zhang.  A total of 80 fishery boats and 697 cargo ships were counted by the team from Yichang-Wuhan. Twenty-seven cargo ships were calculated within 30 minutes in the waters off the Hannan district of Wuhan, while the number in Shijitou stood at six.  Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the IHB, WWF and Wuhan Baiji Dolphin Conservation Fund, the expedition commenced on November 11 and comes only six years after the Baiji dolphin - another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise - was declared functionally extinct. For more information please contact: Qiu Wei, Senior Communications Officer, WWF China, wqiu@wwfchina.org, +86 10 6511 6272
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บทบาทของไทย กับอนาคตบนเส้นด้ายของแม่น้ำโขง - จิม ลิป ผู้อำนวยการใหญ่ WWF เขียนจดหมายเปิดผนึกทวงถามรัฐบาลในภูมิภาคลุ่มน้ำโขง รวมทั้งผู้นำทางฝั่งยุโรปและอเมริกาที่เงียบเฉยต่อโครงการก่อสร้างเขื่อนไซยะบุรี ที่รัฐบาลลาวประกาศเดินหน้าเต็มตัวเมื่อต้นเดือนพ.ย.ที่ผ่านมา จิมบอกว่าเดิมพันครั้งนี้คืออนาคตของคนในลุ่มน้ำโขงตอนล่างราว60ล้านคน ซึ่งร้อยละ80 พึ่งพาทรัพยากรธรรมชาติโดยตรงจากสายเลือดหลักเส้นนี้ หากเขื่อนไซยะบุรีสร้างได้ เขื่อนที่อยู่ในแผนอีกกว่า 10 แห่งก็อาจจะเกิดขึ้นตามมา และนั่นจะส่งผลกระทบอย่างใหญ่หลวงต่อความมั่งคงด้านอาหารและวิถีชีวิตของผู้คนในภูมิภาค เขื่อนไซยะบุรีเป็นบททดสอบสำคัญถึงหัวใจของ 'การพัฒนาอย่างยั่งยืน' ที่่บรรดารัฐบาลและองค์กรที่สนับสนุนการพัฒนาพร่ำพูดถึง ประเทศในลุ่มน้ำโขงตอนล่างมีโอกาสที่จะพิสูจน์แนวคิดดังกล่าวโดยการพิจารณาอย่างรอบคอบถึงสมดุลระหว่างความมั่งคงด้านอาหาร น้ำ และพลังงาน ที่ไม่จำเป็นต้องคุกคามทำลายระบบนิเวศที่เป็นรากฐานสำคัญของทุกสิ่ง ประเทศไทยในฐานะผู้นำในภูมิภาคมีบทบาทสำคัญยิ่งต่อการพัฒนาโครงการเขื่อนไซยะบุรี เพราะประเทศไทยเป็นผู้รับซื้อไฟฟ้าหลัก และธนาคารของไทยอย่างน้อยสี่แห่งยังแสดงเจตจำนงค์ที่จะสนับสนุนเงินกู้ให้โครงการก่อสร้างเขื่อนไซยะบุรี แม้อาจจะมีผลกระทบด้านสังคมและสิ่งแวดล้อมที่สูงมาก WWF ขอเรียกร้องให้ประเทศไทยแสดงบทบาทที่ชัดเจนและรับผิดชอบต่อการพัฒนาพลังงานในลุ่มน้ำโขงตอนล่าง โดยการยกเลิกข้อตกลงท่ีจะรับซื้อพลังงานจากโครงการจนกว่าโครงการนี้จะได้รับการเห็นชอบจากคณะกรรมาธิการแม่น้ำโขง และขอเรียกร้องให้ธนาคารในประเทศไทยล้มเลิกเจตนารมณ์ที่จะให้เงินกู้กับโครงการที่ยังเป็นที่ถกเถียงอย่างกว้างขวาง ----- The Xayaburi dam would be the first dam on the lower Mekong mainstream, and could well open the way for 10 more dams currently proposed. It threatens economic development prospects and basic food security for 60 million people, 80 percent of whom depend directly on the river for their food and livelihoods. WWF International Director General Jim Leape With the livelihoods of 60 million people on the line, science – not guesswork – must prevail. On November 7, the government of Laos held a ground-breaking ceremony to launch construction of the Xayaburi dam. If built, this massive dam would be the first dam on the lower Mekong mainstream, and could well open the way for 10 more dams currently proposed. It threatens economic development prospects and basic food security for 60 million people, 80 percent of whom depend directly on the river for their food and livelihoods. The fish that migrate up and down the free-flowing lower Mekong are the principal source of protein for those 60 million people, and are the basis for a fishing industry with an estimated value as high as $7.6 billion annually. And the river's natural flooding cycles feed agriculture that brings in another $4.6 billion. So the stakes are high. The governments of Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam have acknowledged the need for additional research into the unique functioning of the lower Mekong. In December 2011, the Mekong River Commission agreed to conduct further studies on the effects of the Xayaburi dam and 10 other proposed mainstream dams. To date, no studies have been conducted, leaving significant questions unanswered about how mainstream dams will affect migratory fish populations and the flow of sediment that nourishes farmland downstream. These are not merely questions for biologists and hydrologists. They are questions for ministers of agriculture, health and finance. They are questions for banks and donors, including Australia, the European Union and the US, which have invested an estimated $1 billion in development aid in Laos and downstream countries over the past 25 years. Economic growth gained at the expense of food security is no development victory. The curious lack of opposition to the Xayaburi dam at the recent Asia-Europe Meeting or the East Asia Summit could be read as tacit support for the project. This would call into question European and U.S. rhetoric about sustainable development. Support, whether tacit or explicit, for a project this risky and blatantly shortsighted is incompatible with an agenda that promotes food security, economic opportunity, energy access and a stable climate. Indeed, the Xayaburi dam is a crucial test case. Are recent discussions about the trade-offs required to achieve food, water and energy security just talk? Or are governments and investors willing to go beyond buzzwords like "nexus thinking" where it truly matters? The nations of the lower Mekong have an opportunity to turn concept into reality by taking a balanced approach to meeting food, water and energy needs, while conserving the natural resources that underpin all of these. As a regional leader, Thailand also plays an important role. Thailand is slated to be the prime consumer of the electricity produced, and at least four Thai banks have expressed their interest in providing loans to the project, despite the acute environmental and social costs, and the uncertainties surrounding the financial return of the project. WWF calls on Thailand to act responsibly and cancel its power purchase agreement until there is regional consensus on dams. On complex issues of conservation and poverty-reduction, "clearly right" answers are rare. This is one of the few instances when all the governments and scientists have agreed: It's too risky to build a dam across the lower Mekong. There's too much we don't know, and the stakes are too high. If the project goes ahead, the history of the lower Mekong will be divided into before and after Xayaburi. This will set the precedent, making it harder to oppose the 10 additional proposed dams. How many times must we look back in hindsight before we understand the magnitude and permanence of such decisions? The groundbreaking ceremony at Xayaburi might make the dam seem like a fait accompli. On the contrary. There is still time to reconsider. There are options to develop hydropower along Mekong tributaries – options that research shows would have far less impact on migratory fish, and therefore food security and livelihoods. Let's listen to the science and chart a sustainable path for development along the lower Mekong.
Feed ItemYangtze finless porpoise population declines
Wuhan, China -- A total of 380 Yangtze finless porpoise have been visually identified during a survey expedition along the Yangtze River, marking a significant decline from a previous research in 2006, according to initial results. Meanwhile, acoustic equipment identified 172 finless porpoise during the expedition. "There is a notable downtrend in the population size of the finless porpoise based on our observation," said Wang Kexiong, deputy head of the research expedition and an associate researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB). Two survey ships docked at IHB's wharf in Wuhan of Hubei on Monday, concluding a 44-day and 3,400km round-trip voyage between the Chinese cities of Yichang and Shanghai.   Results of the expedition, including the population of the finless porpoise in the Yangtze River, are to be made available in about two months after sufficient analysis, said Wang. "Compared with the 2006 survey, the distribution areas of finless porpoise remains roughly the same, with signs of scattering in some parts," said Wang. There are fewer finless porpoise in the mainstream of the Yangtze while more discoveries have been made in wharf and port areas. "That could be attributed to rich fish bait resources there. Busy shipping traffic in the mainstream, especially in port regions, poses a threat to the survival of finless porpoise," said Wang. Shipping traffic in the mainstream of Yangtze River -- the lower reaches in particular – has increased considerably, with an average of 100 cargo ships per hour passing through. Rates were even higher in the Zhenjiang-Jiangyin section of the Yangtze, with an average of 105 cargo ships passing every half hour. "Such shipping traffic volumes would become a potential threat to the finless porpoise who rely on their sonar system to survive," said Zhang Xinqiao, expedition team member and WWF finless porpoise programme officer. The team encountered 9,643 cargo ships and 736 fishery ships during voyage, which ran from 11 November – 23 December 2012.  . Researchers found dense distributions of finless porpoise in waters that are not open to navigation, such as the Jiajiang River, and attribute this to less human disturbance. Less optimistic was the discovery of illegal fishing practices in these areas, including traps that could affect finless porpoise.   . "Generally, the finless porpoise are scattered in the Yangtze mainstream, with a small group of them living in a comparatively narrow area. Such an isolation is not necessarily a positive thing for their reproduction," cautioned Wang. The scattered distribution pattern could be the result of shipping traffic that made migration harder, projects that altered hydrological conditions in the middle and lower reaches and habit loss, said Wang. The findings on the number of population and variation trend are to be finalized according to a model that takes validity of calculation, density of distribution, width of the river, sailing length and areas covered into consideration. The results are to contribute to the drafting of Action Plan for the Yangtze Finless Porpoise Conservation by the Ministry of Agriculture and proposals concerning the conservation areas. Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the IHB, WWF and Wuhan Baiji Dolphin Conservation Fund, the expedition first set sail on 11 November and comes only six years after the Baiji dolphin - another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise - was declared functionally extinct. For further information: Qiu Wei, Senior Communications Officer, WWF China, wqiu@wwfchina.org, +86 10 6511 6272 
Feed ItemDrava-Mura confluence will remain unspoilt
Zagreb, Croatia – A highly controversial river regulation project that would have turned the Drava-Mura confluence on the Hungarian-Croatian border into little more than a lifeless canal, has been rejected by the Croatian Ministry of Environment and Nature Protection. This important step comes after four years of campaigning against the project by WWF, EuroNatur and the Drava League. The demise of the project would in effect protect the core zone of the recently designated Croatian-Hungarian part of the future 5-country UNESCO Biosphere reserve "Mura-Drava-Danube". The Mura-Drava confluence has some of Europe's best preserved wetlands and is home to endangered species such as the White-tailed eagle, Black stork and Otter. All species rely on the natural shifting of the riverbeds as well as on habitats such as floodplain forests, sand and gravel banks. In October, a comprehensive monitoring report issued by the European Commission on Croatia's state of preparedness for EU membership detected significant gaps in the implementation of EU environmental law. In particular, the report criticized the insufficient quality of Environmental Impact Assessment studies (EIAs) and found that they were not in line with EU standards. WWF, EuroNatur and Croatian NGOs had repeatedly warned that more than 500 kilometres of Croatia's natural rivers are at risk of being turned into canals. They had argued that the EIA's did not assess the projects' environmental impact properly and the projects contradicted EU law. Nevertheless, five out of seven projects had already gained approval by the Croatian Ministry of Environment and Nature Protection. Still pending a decision is the regulation of 53 kilometres of the Danube River in the transboundary area of Croatia and Serbia. "The ministerial decision against the destruction of the Drava-Mura confluence is an important signal for the better protection of unique natural areas in Croatia", said Arno Mohl, International Freshwater Officer at WWF. "We trust that Minister Zmajlović will now also stop the rest of the projects". Croatia's unique rivers provide free ecosystem services like flood protection, water purification and climate change mitigation and, hence, are of extreme importance for the wellbeing of people. Straightening and channelling the natural river would massively harm the already vulnerable river landscapes and lead to irreversible loss of nature and wildlife.
Feed ItemRegional cooperation on Mekong River in tatters
Gland, Switzerland – Ministers from Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam meeting next week in the Lao city of Luang Prabang must put derailed decision-making on Mekong River mainstream dams back on track or risk sabotaging management of one of the world's great rivers, warns WWF. Environment and water ministers had agreed in 2011 to delay a decision on building the US$3.5-billion Xayaburi dam pending further studies on its environmental impacts. This agreement was swept aside last November when Laos decided to forge ahead with construction of the controversial dam . The 16-17 January Ministerial-level meeting of the Mekong River Commission (MRC) – an inter-governmental agency made up of representatives from the four lower Mekong countries – will put transboundary cooperation to the test and the fate of the Mekong River, vital to the livelihoods of 60 million people. "The Xayaburi dam experiment threatens the health and productivity of the Mekong River and Delta, and could leave millions of people facing critical food insecurity," said Dr. Jian-hua Meng, WWF's Sustainable Hydropower Specialist. "Ministers must take a stand against Xayaburi-style diplomacy or it will be the dangerous precedent for the future." Xayaburi dam is a crucial test case As the first dam to enter the MRC's consultation process, the Xayaburi project is a crucial test case for 10 other dams proposed for the lower mainstream of the river. The MRC process requires countries to jointly review development projects proposed for the Mekong mainstream with an aim to reach consensus on whether or not they should proceed. Laos is now constructing Xayaburi dam without consensus among its neighbours or notifying the MRC. In November last year, the MRC delivered the much anticipated concept note for a joint study aimed at filling critical data gaps and guiding sustainable development of the Mekong River, including mainstream hydropower projects. The study was requested by Ministers at the 2011 MRC meeting. "Without the results of the study, dam development on the lower Mekong mainstream is now largely guesswork," added Dr. Meng. "A fix it as you go approach with Xayaburi dam, and throwing money at problems as they inevitably arise, is not sound engineering nor smart development." Thai banks back dam despite severe risks Thailand is slated to be the prime consumer of the electricity produced by Xayaburi dam, and at least four Thai banks have confirmed their interest in financing the project, despite the acute environmental and social costs, and the uncertainties surrounding the financial return of the project. "Thailand must act responsibly and cancel its premature power purchase agreement until there is regional consensus on dams," added Dr. Meng. "And if the Thai banks do their risk assessment homework well, and value their international reputation and financial returns, they'd do well to reconsider and to pull out of this project." WWF urges Mekong ministers to defer a decision on the dam for 10 years to ensure critical data can be gathered and a decision can be reached using sound science and analysis. Future of MRC hangs in the balance "If decision-making continues to occur outside of the MRC, the institution will soon lose its legitimacy and US$300 million of international donor support to the Commission will be wasted," added Dr. Meng. "Mekong countries need to stop wasting time picking apart the MRC process, and start using common sense and sound science again to reach joint decisions that are to the benefit of all." Reviews of the dam development have identified serious gaps in data and weaknesses with the proposed fish passes for the mega dam, and confirmed the Xayaburi project will block part of the sediment flow, destabilising the river's ecosystem upon which farmers, fishers and many other economic sectors depend. WWF advises lower Mekong countries considering hydropower projects to prioritise dams on some Mekong tributaries that are easier to assess and are considered to have a much lower impact and risk. About the mighty Mekong TEDxWWF talk by WWF-Greater Mekong Interim Representative, Stuart Chapman, on hydropower development on the Mekong River.
Feed ItemGlobal fashion company H&M tackles business and environmental risk with cutting-edge water strategy
Stockholm — Fashion retailer H&M says its new water strategy will minimize water impacts throughout its operations and supply chain, and create positive change in key river basins with major garment production. The strategy was created in partnership with conservation organization WWF, which will work with H&M to implement it over the next three years. "Water is a key resource for H&M, and we are committed to ensuring water is used responsibly throughout our value chain. We do this to minimize risks in our operations, protect the environment and secure availability of water for present and future generations. We are proud of the partnership with WWF, which we hope will inspire others to follow," says Karl-Johan Persson, CEO of H&M. During 2012, WWF and H&M performed a comprehensive evaluation of all H&M's efforts and challenges related to water. These include agricultural production of fibers, as well as dyeing and washing processes. The review guided development of the new H&M water strategy, which WWF and H&M will implement together starting this year. According to WWF, no other fashion company has such a comprehensive global water strategy. "This partnership marks an evolution in the corporate approach to water. H&M understands that its long-term success depends on access to adequate water supplies. It also understands that its social license to operate depends on being a good neighbour and good steward of shared resources. H&M's water strategy is an integral part of its business plan. We hope other companies will be inspired to take the same approach," says Jim Leape, Director General of WWF International. To embed sustainability from the beginning, H&M designers and buyers will receive additional training on water impacts of raw material production, as well as wet processes for different styles. H&M will also improve its internal water efficiency, minimize its suppliers' impact on water, and educate staff and customers about water issues. WWF and H&M will work in collaboration with policymakers, NGOs, water institutions and other companies to support better management of particular river basins in China and Bangladesh – key production hubs for the company. In addition, H&M will support WWF freshwater conservation projects in the Yangtze river basin in China. Currently, 2.7 billion people – roughly 40 per cent of the world's population – live in river basins that experience severe water scarcity during at least one month of the year, according to WWF's 2012 Living Planet Report. About a third of the factories that make clothes for H&M using wet processes are already located in extreme water scarce areas, or will be by 2025. This partnership builds on 10 years of H&M's work to reduce negative water impacts in different parts of the value chain.
Feed ItemBolivia designates world's largest protected wetland
Trinidad, Bolivia — To mark the annual World Wetlands Day, the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance has designated the Bolivian Llanos De Moxos wetland its largest site ever. At more than 6.9 million hectares, the site is equivalent to the size of the Netherlands and Belgium together, and is prized for its rich natural diversity, as well as cultural value. "WWF applauds the government of Bolivia for taking bold action to protect these vital ecosystems," said Jim Leape, WWF International Director General. "The Amazon basin, covering nine countries, supports native species and the millions of people who live there – and plays an essential role in regulating the climate we all depend on. Healthy wetlands support the proper functioning of the whole Amazon ," Leape added. The Llanos de Moxos, located near the borders of Bolivia, Peru and Brazil, consists of tropical savannas with cyclical droughts and floods. These wetlands are especially prized for their rich natural diversity: 131 species of mammals have been identified to date, 568 different birds, 102 reptiles, 62 amphibians, 625 fish and at least 1,000 plant species. Several species – including the giant otter and the Bolivian river dolphin – have been identified as vulnerable, endangered or at critical risk of extinction. The region is traversed by three major rivers, the Beni in the west, the Iténez or Guaporé to the east, and the Mamoré in the central region. These rivers converge to form the Madeira River, the major southern tributary of the Amazon River. The Llanos de Moxos wetlands are important to avoid floods, maintain minimum flows in the rivers during the dry season and regulate the region's hydrological cycle. The area is sparsely populated, comprising seven indigenous territories and eight protected areas. Peasant communities and private properties also exist in the region, both mainly dedicated to farming. The region was inhabited by pre-Columbian cultures from 800 B.C. to 1200 A.D. These together formed the "Moxos water-based cultures" typified by the clever use of hydraulic infrastructure for water management of the vast territory covered by the llanos, or plains, which sustained intensive agricultural production on which these ancient peoples survived. The Bolivian Government Commitment "We recognize the significant role of these wetlands in the conservation of Mother Earth, as well as the importance of the declaration confirming the Llanos de Moxos as internationally protected wetlands. We are proud to confirm to the world that the government of Bolivia is committed, in collaboration with social actors, to assuming the preservation of these areas as evidence of our efforts to achieve development for all our citizens," stated Juan Pablo Cardozo Arnez, Bolivian Deputy Minister for the Environment. "This is an important step as we continue to forge a truly harmonious relationship between our peoples and Mother Earth," Arnez added. The Deputy Minister went on to say: "Echoing the words of our President Evo Morales, we call upon all countries to incorporate [environmental] rights into their legislation and to comply with existing international agreements in this respect, so that human beings can begin to live in complete harmony and equilibrium with Mother Earth." Ramsar Convention The Convention on Wetlands of International Importance is an intergovernmental treaty, signed by 160 countries in 1971 in the Iranian city of Ramsar. The Ramsar Convention's mission is the conservation and wise use of wetlands, with the goal of achieving sustainable development. The designation of Llanos de Moxos is the product of a cooperative effort led by the government of of Beni Department, and Bolivia's Environment and Water Ministry and Vice-Ministry of the Environment. WWF did the technical studies under the Ramsar Convention framework to qualify for designation as a wetland of international importance. Bolivia acceded to the Ramsar Convention in 1990 and ratified it on 7 May 2002. It has eight other Ramsar sites: Los Lípez in south western Potosi Department; Lake Titicaca (La Paz Department), the Taczara basin in Tarija Department, Lakes Poopó and Uru Uru (Oruro Department), the Bolivian Pantanal, the Izozog Marshes and the Parapetí River in Santa Cruz de la Sierra. "The Moxos' declaration is a victory for wetlands conservation in the Amazon region. It will help protect different ecosystems and landscapes, guarantee a balanced provision of goods and services for Amazonian inhabitants and secure the future of this rich but fragile area," said Luis Pabón, WWF-Bolivia Country Director. "But most important is the challenge the Bolivian government and society are assuming, committing to protect the Llanos de Moxos in the long term. This declaration is clear evidence of how, here in Latin America and especially in Bolivia, supporting government conservation processes and policies can lead to important achievements," he added.
Feed ItemRare turtle sets Japanese precedent
Japan is asking the world's governments to help protect the Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle, a rare turtle found on only three small islands in the Okinawa group. The turtle was proposed by the Japanese Government for listing in Appendix II of CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, following the discovery of it on the international trade scene in mainland China, Hong Kong and online. It is the first time Japan has submitted a proposal to CITES, which is currently meeting in Bangkok, Thailand. At home, under Japanese law, the Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle is designated as a "natural monument" and cannot be captured, transferred or traded without permission from the Commissioner for Cultural Affairs. But the appearance of the species in the pet trade outside Japan strongly suggests illegal activity is taking place. Governments at CITES chose to accept the Japanese listing proposal, which will see this unique turtle gain better protection against illegal international trade. #cites Japan asks world's govts to protect rare Ryukyu Black-breasted Leaf #Turtle . First +ve ask fr Japan at Cites traffic.org/home/2013/3/8/... — Damian Carrington (@dpcarrington) March 8, 2013 The proposal arose after TRAFFIC market surveys raised the alarm following the discovery of small numbers of protected Japanese reptiles in the Asian pet trade. They included 31 Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtles in two shops in Hong Kong, while two further shops plus one in neighbouring Guangzhou, southern China, told TRAFFIC that they received orders for the species. TRAFFIC has released a new report at CITES, Trade in Japanese Endemic Reptiles in China and Recommendations for Species Conservation, recommending that the Japanese government propose the listing of the turtle. "The proposal to list the Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle is a small but significant step for Japan," said Kahoru Kanari, Senior Programme Officer with TRAFFIC and an author of the report. "We hope it signals Japan's intention to place more importance on the conservation of wild species found in international trade." In total 11 proposals were submitted to CITES for listings of freshwater turtles from around the world.
Feed ItemWWF exposes seven sins of dam building
Gland/Berlin - On World Water Day, WWF criticizes dam projects worldwide that continue to violate fundamental sustainability criteria. In the WWF report, "Seven Sins of Dam Building," numerous dam projects under construction or planned are given a failing review by the conservation organization. Aside from the internationally controversial Belo Monte (Brazil) and Xayaburi (Laos) dams, European projects, such as in Austria and Turkey, are also on the list.. The 'seven sins' outlined in the report include issues with dam location, neglecting biodiversity, environmental flows, social and economic factors, and risk analysis. WWF also notes that dam decisions often blindly follow "a bias to build" without considering better, cheaper, and less damaging alternatives. "Properly planned, built, and operated dams can contribute to food and energy security. Unfortunately, short-term interests are too often the focus of decision-making," says Dr. Jian-hua Meng, Water Security Specialist for WWF. "In order to guarantee acceptable levels of social and environmental sustainability, dam installations and operations should be stringently checked against sustainability criteria as formulated under the World Commission on Dams or the Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Protocol. If necessary, insufficiently performing projects must be modified or halted," added Meng. No sustainable outcomes can be expected when dam proponents rely on superior financial strength and political connections rather than on dialogue, transparency, and reason, says WWF. Additionally, some governments lack the capacity or independence to protect public interests. Successful and overall long-term beneficial dam projects need more than just the legal regulator's approval, according to the report. "For large-scale projects, operators must also obtain the 'social license to operate'. Acceptance of the project by the population is fundamental to sustainable management," says Meng. "Negative effects, such as relocation, destruction of cultural sites, or the collapse of local fisheries are still too often dismissed as somebody else's problem." Scientific evidence and risk assessments too frequently lose out to one-sided political or economic agendas, according to the report. Subsequently, dams are still planned and built in ecologically high value areas and biodiversity loss is still too often not accounted for. Serious impacts, caused by a change in the natural water flow dynamics or the disappearance of wetlands, are still not given consideration. Moreover, the size of a dam is not necessarily a deciding factor. Though numerous mega-projects can be found in the report's case studies, the cumulative impact of many small hydro projects, like for instance in Romania, cannot be underestimated. The problems are not limited to developing and emerging countries. G7 companies and engineers continue to not only push projects forward in emerging markets that are unacceptable by global standards, but also in the heart of the EU and North America, reproaches WWF. For example, heavy ecological deterioration looms for three alpine valleys in the Ötztal Alps in Austria, if the extension of the Kaunertal hydroelectric power plants is implemented with the current plans, the report cites. "WWF reviewed nine dams and we found that many projects commit not just one, but many grave sins of dam building. However, these errors are avoidable. Lack of capacity, economic pressure, or specific regional circumstances can no longer be presented as excuses," Meng stated.
Feed ItemYangtze finless porpoise population nosedives to 1,000
Wuhan, China -- The Yangtze finless porpoise population has declined to a mere 1,000 individuals, making the endangered species even more rare than the wild giant panda, the 2012 Yangtze Freshwater Dolphin Survey Report reveals.

 The population in the mainstream of the Yangtze River was less than half of what a similar survey found six years ago, with food shortages and human disturbance such as increased shipping traffic major threats to their survival. The study also found that the rare species annual rate of decline now stands at 13.7 percent, which means that the Yangtze finless porpoise could be extinct as early as the year 2025. The report comes after a 44-day and 3,400-kilometer round-trip research expedition on the Yangtze River between Yichang in Hubei Province and Shanghai. Led by China's Ministry of Agriculture and organized by the Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, WWF and the Wuhan Baiji Dolphin Conservation Fund, the expedition first set sail on 11 November 2012.

 The crew visually identified 380 individual Yangtze finless porpoise in the river's mainstream during the 2012 survey. Based on this observation, scientists determined through analyses that the population in the Yangtze mainstream is about 500, down from 1,225 in 2006.
 In October 2012, research was carried out in two adjoining lakes, the Poyang and Dongting, where the population was about 450 and 90, respectively, according to the report.

In a sharp contrast, 851 individuals of Yangtze finless porpoise were visually identified in the mainstream of the Yangtze during the 2006 survey. That research, however, did not cover the two lakes.
 "The species is moving fast toward its extinction," said Wang Ding, head of the research expedition and a professor at the IHB.

Attempts to find traces of the Baiji Dolphin, another rare cetacean and close relative of the finless porpoise, failed during the 2012 survey. The Baiji dolphin was declared "functionally extinct." According to data captured by acoustic equipment onboard the observation ships, the largest numbers of finless porpoise were found in the river sections east of Wuhan, with 67 percent recorded between Hukou in Jiangxi Province and Nanjing in Jiangsu Province, the report shows.

 There is a notable sign of scattered distribution pattern which could be the result of "shipping traffic that made migration harder, projects that altered hydrological conditions in the middle and lower reaches and habitat loss," said Wang with the IHB.

 The report also cautions that small groups of Yangtze finless porpoise living in comparative isolation may have a negative impact on their ability to reproduce.
 There are fewer finless porpoise in the mainstream of the Yangtze while more discoveries were made in wharf and port areas, scientists found.

 "They may risk their lives for rich fish bait resources there. But busy shipping traffic close to the port areas poses a threat to the survival of finless porpoise," said Wang.

 "Lack of fishery resources and human disturbances including shipping traffic are among the key threats to the Yangtze finless porpoise survival," Lei Gang, director of freshwater programme at WWF-China, said.
 Researchers found dense distributions of finless porpoise in waters that are not open to navigation and attribute this to less human disturbance. Less optimistic was the discovery of illegal fishing practices in these areas, including traps that could affect finless porpoise.

 A set of enhanced measures that include in-situ conservation and ex-situ conservation approaches are essential for efforts of saving the species from its distinction, said Lei.

Given that, the report calls for all-year-round fishing ban for all river dolphin reserves, establishment of a national reserve in Poyang Lake and ex-situ conservation reserves along the Yangtze. For further information: Qiu Wei, WWF China, +86 10 6511 6272, WQiu@wwfchina.org
Feed ItemProtection of bird colonies takes flight with creation of three Ramsar wetlands
Ruse, Bulgaria – The environmental ministers of Bulgaria and Romania officially signed a proposal to create three new transboundary wetland complexes along the Danube River prepared by WWF late last year. The new sites will later be considered and approved by the Secretariat of the Ramsar Convention on the Conservation of Wetlands. "The new transboundary wetland complexes – Srebarna-Lake Calarasi, Belene Islands Complex-Suhaia and Ibisha Island-Bistret – will allow for the full protection of the bird colonies that nest and feed in Bulgaria and Romania. The two countries will be able to take coordinated, cooperative measures to better protect wetlands and migratory species, which feed, winter, nest and breed on both sides of the river," said Laurice Ereifej, head of WWF Central and Eastern Europe Freshwater Programme. Monitoring done by WWF in the last three years shows that heron colonies that nest on the Bulgarian island of Ibisha feed in the Romanian lake of Bistret. The same goes for pygmy cormorants and pelicans nesting in the Srebarna Lake in Bulgaria that feed in the Romanian lake of Calarasi. "The two countries can work on a joint strategy for wetland management that will allow for the full protection of the bird species. Bulgaria and Romania can take coordinated measures by executing common bans on logging and hunting in the region and by not allowing access to the bird colonies during breeding," said Ivan Hristov, head of Freshwater for WWF-Bulgaria. At the end of 2012, WWF launched a study of Bistret, Suhaia, Calarasi, Srebarna, Ibisha and Belene Islands Complex as part of the Green Borders LIFE+ EU-funded project to propose transboundary conservation measures for bird species and to designate cross-border nature reserves along the Lower Danube. Wetlands include rivers, lakes, ponds and floodplain forests, among others. They are among the most valuable ecosystems as they preserve a huge amount of biodiversity and ensure ecosystem services for humans. Wetlands play a key role in the water cycle, restore water supplies, can reduce floods, provide habitat for fish and purify surface or groundwater. In the last century, the majority of wetlands in Bulgaria and Romania have been destroyed. Their protection is a priority for WWF. The Convention on the Conservation of Wetlands was signed on 2 February 1971 in the Iranian city of Ramsar. It is the first international agreement for the protection and sustainable use of natural resources. The mission of the Ramsar Convention is the conservation and wise use of all wetlands through local, regional and national actions and international cooperation, as a contribution to sustainable development.
Feed ItemIs Wetland Mitigation Unconstitutional?
The Supreme Court recently listened to a case arguing the government is not allowed to require a landowner to use personal resources for public use in order to obtain a permit. Here, The Swamp School, an educational group for those interested in wetlands and green issues, has provided key elements of the case that all seem to center around the scope of government.
Feed ItemRemote Sensing: A Primer
Nearly all types of environmental finance – whether mitigation banking, payments for watershed services, or REDD – involve some form of remote sensing. But this catch-all phrase encompasses scores of practices using radar, lidar, and infrared technology from satellites, airplanes, and blimps. Here's how they all fit together.
Feed ItemKenyan Flower-Growers Use Watershed Payments To Save Their Lake And Their Livelihoods
Flower growers in Kenya’s Rift Valley have gradually reduced their runoff to keep their water clean, but subsistence farmers high in the hills can’t afford to implement such actions. WWF is spearheading a PWS program designed to fix that, by asking downstream users to support sustainable agriculture efforts in the catchments.
Feed ItemPWS In Kenya: How WWF And CARE Found Common Ground In High Hills
Subsistence farmers in the hills above Kenya’s Lake Naivasha face an uncertain future, and climate-change has only made it worse. Here’s how WWF and CARE teamed up to harvest payments for watershed services that might help those farmers through the coming bad years – and, in the process, save the lake below.
Feed ItemTying The Knot: Buyers And Sellers In Kenyan PWS
Entering into a PWS program is more akin to getting married than it is to buying a normal product, and participants often face an array of hopes and fears at the outset. Here’s how deep-pocketed flower-growers along the shore of Kenya’s Lake Naivasha and subsistence farmers in the hills 40 kilometers away finally tied the knot – and what it means for similar programs.
Feed ItemStacking And Unstacking: The Conservation And The Conversation
To build ecosystem markets, we’ve tended to break holistic nature into incomplete but measurable chunks of nature – and then we wonder why it’s difficult to bundle those chunks into something holistic. Maybe instead of stacking existing credits, we should be creating more holistic instruments.
Feed ItemThis Week In Water: Putting Together The Pieces For Watershed Payments In Kenya
Ecosystem Marketplace will be hosting a webinar this month on the best and most up to date financing mechanisms for watershed conservation. Not long after, in May, the Katoomba Group will hold their 18th meeting in Beijing, China to investigate nature-based solutions to the water crisis.
Feed ItemWorld Water Day: <br /> Will The Private Sector Up?
Everyone agrees we won’t solve the global water crisis without more involvement from the private sector, but how do we bring them in? One answer, increasingly, is to promote better governance. For only if the public sector functions can the private sector perform.
Feed ItemArkansas Oil Spill And <br /> The High Cost Of Dirty Water
Images of oil-drenched Mayflower, Arkansas have been front-page news all week, but the real environmental damage – and economic cost – is being incurred 1500 miles to the north, where the impact of tar sands operations on water supplies is only now coming into focus. It's time to identify the true cost of tar sands extraction.
Feed ItemKenyan Farmers Boost Yields With Payments For Watershed Services
For two years now, flower growers along the shore of Kenya’s Lake Naivasha have been paying farmers in the hills 40 kilometers away to adopt sustainable agriculture practices. They’re doing it to save their lake, but it’s also helping farmers lift themselves out of poverty.
Feed ItemIndia’s resource nexus: priorities for action
Feed ItemWetland mitigation bank a new approach to preserving habitat
Feed ItemHow green is Dublin's Tolka Valley?
Feed ItemKansas University Conference Discusses Midwest Conservation Issues
Feed ItemStaying Green And Growing Jobs
Feed ItemManaging the water-energy-food nexus in India
Feed ItemProduction sectors cost $7.3 trillion annually: UN-backed study
Feed ItemWA stormwater, green infrastructure upgrades to protect waterways from raw sewage
Feed ItemLeaking pipes, dirty water and an ailing DJB
Feed ItemWater Stocks Beat Gold, Oil as Shortages Loom
Feed ItemSolar Desalination: Creating new sources of water with the power of the sun
Feed ItemWater Scarcity Means Business for Companies & Investors
Feed ItemSaving Lives, Livelihoods, and Life
Feed ItemAre the taps flowing?
Feed ItemConservationists buy key NSW wetlands
Feed ItemKootenai River Network, Inc
  Follow this link : Kootenai River Network, Inc. is a U.S. 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that accomplishes its goals through grants and contributions from collaborators. The group formed late in 1991 in response to citizens concerns of threatened or deteriorating water quality and aquatic resources in the Kootenai River Basin. The primary purpose of the Kootenai River Network is to foster communication and implement collaborative processes among private and public interests in the watershed.
Feed ItemHow Central Asia responded to water management challenges
Feed ItemMekong Basin Planning: The Story Behind the Basin Development Plan
Click on "read more" for full info
Feed ItemThe Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and the Blue Nile: Implications for transboundary water governance
Click on "read more" for full info
Feed ItemRio Grande - David and Goliath: Texas v. New Mexico. Can a Court Create Water?
Follow this link : Water Rights and the American Southwest. Well researched discussion of the problems of water apportionment between Texas and New Mexico on the Rio Grande, USA.
Feed ItemThe Danube River Basin, shared by 19 countries, is now admired around the world as a model for integrated water resource management
Feed ItemIntroduction to the UNDP/GEF Kura Aras River Basin Project
Feed ItemHope for the Colorado River Delta
Feed ItemEco-TIRAS: International Environmental Association of River Keepers of the Dniester River basin
Follow this link : Eco-TIRAS International Environmental Association of River Keepers is created by environmental NGOs of the Dniester River basin, shared by Moldova and Ukraine, to help and advice authorities and population to manage the river in sustainable way, using Integrated River Basin Management Approach. In present it unites 38 NGOs-members.
Feed ItemLake Turkana under threat
Feed ItemSave River Basin - SADC transboundary dialogue
Follow this link : The Save/Sabi River rises as the Sabi south of Harare and flows southeast from the Zimbabwean highveld to its confluence with the Odzi. It then turns south, drops over the Chivirira Falls, and is joined by the Lundi at the Mozambique border. The river continues as the Save, following an east-northeasterly course to its mouth near Mambone on the Mozambique Channel of the Indian Ocean.
Feed ItemIncomati River Basin - SADC transboundary dialogue
Follow this link : The Incomati basin is shared by Mozambique, South Africa and Swaziland. These riparian states establised in 1983 the "Tripartite Permanent Technical Committee" (TPTC) to agree on water use in the shared watercourses enabling sustainable development.
Feed ItemMaputo River Basin - SADC transboundary dialogue
Follow this link : The Maputo basin is shared by Mozambique, South Africa and Swaziland and includes the tributaries Pongola and Usuthu Rivers and the estuary. These riparian states establised in 1983 the "Tripartite Permanent Technical Committee" (TPTC) to agree on water use in the shared watercourses enabling sustainable development.
Feed ItemPungwe River Basin - SADC transboundary dialogue
Follow this link : The Pungwe River flows from the Eastern Highlands in Zimbabwe into Mozambique and drains into the Indian Ocean. The river basin, with its abundant water resources, offers considerable potential for economic grow.
Feed ItemInventory of shared water resources in Western Asia - Orontes River Basin (ESCWA-BGR Cooperation)
ESCWA-BGR Cooperation, 2012. Inventory of Shared Water Resources in Western Asia (Online Version). Chapter 7: Orontes River Basin. Beirut.
Feed ItemUnderstanding the relationship between water, energy and food security
By Rebecca Welling, Project Officer with IUCN’s Global Water Programme.   Recognition and understanding of the closely-bound interaction between water, energy and food production and use – the 'nexus' – is established in these sectors, but perhaps for many, ‘this nexus’ is still not entirely understood. So the IUCN Global Water Programme decided to better […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...
Feed ItemIn good company: Learning about water management and risk
By James Dalton, Coordinator, Global Initiatives, IUCN's Global Water Programme. It has been over three years since we first sat down with CEMEX, the global building materials company headquartered in Monterrey, Mexico. It was one of those meetings where we were not sure what they wanted to talk about apart from the general subject of […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...
Feed ItemWorld Water Day
By Mark Smith, Director of IUCN's Global Water Programme "World Water Day is like any themed global day: it’s not really to ‘celebrate’ water, it’s about getting people to pay attention and decide they’re going to take action to solve water problems."  With this is mind, the day started well. BBC news had a series of reports […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...
Feed ItemOpening the cap on bottled water resource management
By Dr James Dalton, Coordinator, Global Initiatives, IUCN Water Programme. Corporate partnerships are big news nowadays – especially on water. The resource that many of them need or impact upon is fast becoming a focal point for discussions around sustainability. Water footprinting, stewardship, and the ‘nexus’ issues – the complex way water flows through the […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...
Feed ItemFirst Pacific Islands’ Catalogue of Rivers
Publication of the First Catalogue of Rivers for the Pacific Islands 9th May 2012: For the first time a selection of river characteristics from across the Pacific can be found in one book the Catalogue of Rivers for Pacific Islands. The book documents the main features and characteristics of the rivers in eight Pacific Island Countries and the available data associated with them.
Feed ItemPacific IWRM: Cook Islands IWRM Video
Cooks Islands IWRM: New Film Highlights Efforts of the GEF Pacific IWRM Project to Manage Threats to Muri Lagoon 16th May 2012: The following video documentary entitled “Protecting Muri Lagoon” was produced as part of the Cook Island’s GEF Pacific IWRM demonstration project. It shows the current threats to Muri Lagoon and efforts of the demonstration project to reverse current environmental degradation trends at this world class tourism destination.
Feed ItemPacific IWRM: Tonga IWRM Video Documentary
Tonga IWRM: New Film Shows Work of the GEF Pacific IWRM Project to Safeguard Groundwater and Nearshore Water Quality in Vava'u 19th May 2012: The following video documentary entitled "Tonga – Preserve Water, Preserve Life" was produced as part of the GEF Pacific IWRM demonstration project in Vava’u in the Kingdom of Tonga.
Feed ItemFSM’s First National Water Task Force Meeting
Strengthening National Coordination of Efforts to Develop IWRM Policy and Planning in the Federated States of Micronesia 7th June 2012: The Federated States of Micronesia’s National Department of Resources and Development convened the nation's First National Water Task Force Meeting from  23rd-24th May 2012. This meeting brought together water and sanitation related stakeholders from across the vast Micronesian region to launch efforts aimed at developing a National Water and Sanitation Policy and ...
Feed ItemMarshall Islands trials ECOSAN from Tuvalu
EcoSan Composting Toilets Designed and Tested by the Atoll Country of Tuvalu Piloted on Majuro Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands 27th June 2012: Pisi Seleganiu, Project Manager of Tuvalu’s GEF IWRM Project is leading the construction of composting toilets on Majuro Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, to trial how effective they are at reducing septic pollution of Majuro’s main groundwater resource, the Laura water lens.
Feed ItemMajuro Atoll EcoSan Featured on ABC Radio
Use of EcoSan to Safeguard the Laura Water Lens in Majuro Atoll Featured on ABC Radio 28th June 2012: Julius Lucky, Project Manager for the GEF supported Pacific IWRM Demonstration Project in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) was interviewed by Geraldine Coutts on ABC’s Pacific Beat today.
Feed ItemNauru Adopts National IWRM Policy and Plan
Nauru Develops IWRM Implementation Plan Aimed at Ensuring National Water and Sanitation Policy Leads to Strengthened IWRM and Water Security 4th July 2012: In February this year Nauru released its first National Water and Sanitation Policy to address the significant threats, identify key response areas and ensure the water and sanitation needs of a wide range of stakeholders is met.
Feed Item4th IWRM Regional Steering Committee Meeting
Planning the Scaling-Up of Efforts to Ensure Sustainable Water Resource and Wastewater Management in Pacific Island Countries 6th July 2012: The Fourth Regional Steering Committee Meeting for the GEF supported Pacific IWRM Programme will be convened in Nadi, Fiji Islands from 30th July – 3rd August 2012.
Feed ItemPacific IWRM: New Results Video from Nauru
Nauru IWRW: New Film Showcases Results of Efforts to Reform Water and Sanitation Management in Nauru 31st July 2012: The following short film entitled "Delivering IWRM Results in the Small Island Developing State of Nauru" was produced by the GEF Pacific IWRM demonstration project team in Nauru.
Feed ItemIWRM Delivering Water and Sanitation Results
Pacific IWRM Delivering Water and Sanitation Results in Pacific Island Countries 7th August 2012: After three years of hard work Pacific Island countries are starting to deliver significant results under the GEF Pacific IWRM Project. To celebrate the results achieved, a competition was launched this year with 12 countries submitting "Results Notes" to report on progress towards regionally agreed targets for water and sanitation management.
Feed ItemFirst Steering Committee Meeting
22 Nov 2011 in Ulan-Ude, Russia the First Steering Committee Meeting was held.
Feed ItemInception workshop
21 November 2011 in Ulan-Ude, Russia the Project Inception Workshop was held.
Feed ItemInception report
Feed ItemTenders and vacancies anouncement information
Feed Item"Clean Ice of Baikal"
Shoreline and ice cleanup public event
Feed Item"Clean shoreline of Selenga"
Shoreline cleanup public event
Feed ItemV International Scientific Conference “Selenga – river without borders”
Scientific Conference in Ulan-Ude
Feed Item"Baikal dialogue" Forum
"Baikal dialogue" Forum
Feed ItemAll-Russian symposium “Topical problems of analytical chemistry. Analytical methods of environmental objects analysis"
All-Russian symposium on analytical chemistry in Ulan-Ude
Feed ItemZabaikalsky National Park
Meeting in Zabaikalsky National Park
Feed ItemBaikal state nature biosphere reserve
Project Managment Unit group visited Baikal state nature biosphere reserve
Feed ItemNew tenders announcement
Feed ItemPress-conference on the Lake Baikal
Current problems of the project were covered by PM Sergey Kudelya.
Feed ItemNew tenders announcement
New tenders announcement
Feed ItemNew tender announcement
Feed ItemNew tender announcement
RFQ_EMO_2012-033 “Pilot construction of cattle mortuary in Barguzinsky district, Buryatia, The Russian Federation”, application period: 2012 September 21 - 2012 October 01.
Feed ItemWorkshop on transboundary diagnostic analysis
A Workshop on transboundary diagnostic analysis was held in Ulan-Ude on 18-19 September 2012.
Feed ItemShoreline clean-up campaign on Hovsgol Lake and setup of a water sanitation zone in Khatgal village
Feed ItemWorkshop on tourism development in protected natural areas
Feed Item2012 summary
Brief summary of the project achievements in 2012 year
Feed ItemModel Database
Database for modeling and simulation of pollutants transport in the Baikal basin waters.
Feed ItemJoint monitoring program
Harmonized water quality monitoring program for the Selenga Basin
Feed ItemSelenga Delta - water quality
Study on the Selenga Delta water quality issues
Feed ItemSelenga Delta - bentos
Study on the Selenga Delta habitat and the health of the benthic zone
Feed ItemBIC Conception
Baikal Information Center (BIC) Conception
Feed ItemEducation Plan
Ecological Education Enhancement Plan
Feed ItemTraining manual
Upgrade of competency of administrative staff in the field of ecology and sustainable development for Integrated Natural Resource Management in the Baikal Basin Transboundary Ecosystem
Feed ItemEducation Plan - Buryatiya
Road map of ecological education enhancement till 2015 at different levels (preschool, school, college education) has been developed.
Feed ItemStrategy for (dead) livestock disposal
End of works: November 2012 Final products: - Inventory of cattle mortuaries in Barguzinsky and Kurumkansky districts of Buryatia, assessment of their ecological and microbiological condition.
Feed ItemShoreline clean-up - Russia
Shoreline clean-up of the Baikal Lake and Selenga
Feed Item2012 Shoreline clean-up of Hovsgol lake
Shoreline clean-up of Hovsgol lake and setup of a water sanitation zone in Khatgal village
Feed ItemTourism plan for Baikal Bioshpere Reserve
Biodiversity compatible recreational tourism plan for Baikal Bioshpere Reserve
Feed ItemClimate Change Assessment for TDA
Feed ItemHotspot Assessment for TDA
Feed ItemPublic Awareness Plan - Mongolia
Communication and Public Awareness Plan for Conservation of Natural resource management in the Baikal Basin, Mongolian Part
Feed ItemPublic Awareness Plan and Tourist survey - Russia
Feed ItemScientific studies aid planning for Okavango River basin
Feed ItemOKACOM - KAZA Workshop
Feed ItemTDA and SAP discussed at OKACOM 16th Meeting
Feed ItemEPSMO Project evaluation team on tour
Feed ItemSharing the Okavango in Terraviva
Newsletter Article
Feed ItemCrossing Boundaries in Peolwane
An article in Air Botswana's Peolwane magazine features the work of the Okavango TDA.
Feed ItemProtecting the Okavango in Spore
Sustainable Management item in the SPORE newsletter, the magazine for agricultural and rural development in ACP countries, published by CTA.
Feed ItemWorld Water Week 2012
Welcome to the 2012 World Water Week Event Finder! This is an interactive tool to help you explore the World Water Week programme, find sessions that match your interests, and plan your time during the Week. You can use: • drop-down menus to filter the entire week's programme by theme, regional focus, time, venue, or event type. • keyword search box to find programme elements by specific terms such as convener name or topical terminology. To learn more about the different types of events, click http://www.worldwaterweek.org/eventfinder
Feed ItemCelebration of Lake Tanganyika National Day, 2012 edition
"If we do not take care, many human activities pose a threat to Lake Tanganyika," noted Mr. Gabriel Toyi, representing the second Vice-President of the Republic of Burundi, in the ceremonies of Lake Tanganyika National Day, July 22 nd each year. Dr. Henry Mwima, the Executive Director of Lake Tanganyika Authority (LTA) has recognized the efforts made by Burundi in protecting the lake and appealed to other Lake Tanganyika riparian countries (DRC, Tanzania and Zambia) to emulate the example set by the Government of the Republic of Burundi by setting aside one day to celebrate the unique and shared heritage: Lake Tanganyika.
Feed ItemBurundi industrialists called to contribute to protecting water resources
It was during a discussion workshop on the main provisions of the water code in Burundi that was organised by the Ministry of Water, Environment, Land and Urban Planning, in partnership with the Sectoral Programme Water and Sanitation of the Federal German Republic. The water code being disseminated for the implementation of the national water policy adopted in 2009, proves that water management and use are based on 10 key principles.
Feed ItemTanzania - Lake Tanganyika Integrated Regional Development Programme (PRODAP) - Supply and Commissioning of Four Surveillance Boats and Communication Equipment - AOI
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Feed ItemOptimized extraction of daily bio-optical time series derived from MODIS/Aqua imagery for Lake Tanganyika, Africa
Standard MODIS Aqua Ocean Color products were found to not provide a suitable calibration for high altitude lakes such as the Lake Tanganyika . Our results show that for the geographical, atmospheric and optical conditions of Lake Tanganyika : (i) a coastal aerosol model set with high relative humidity (90%) provides a suitable atmospheric correction;
Feed ItemPossible effects of global climate change on the ecosystem of Lake Tanganyika
Any change in the air temperature, wind speed, precipitation, and incoming solar radiation induced by increasing greenhouse gasses and climate change will directly influence lakes and other water bodies. The effects of a slight increase in lake water temperature on the Lake Tanganyika ecosystem might be mitigated by increased windiness, if the latter was sufficient to induce greater mixing.
Feed ItemNew Guide to some invasive plants affecting Lake Tanganyika
Lake Tanganyika Authority in collaboration with UNDP/GEF Project and IUCN Invasive Species Initiative organized a workshop on invasive species affecting Lake Tanganyika at Kibunoah Hotel, in Bujumbura - Burundi, for the Burundi and D. R. Congo Technical Teams on Environmental Issues. "From this 23 rd to 24 th August, 2012, you will be involved to how you can control species that have become invasive and be trained how you can prevent new invasions in order to develop a Monitoring Programme for Invasive Species for the four riparian countries of Lake Tanganyika” said Mr. Gabriel Hakizimana, Director of Environment of Lake Tanganyika Authority – LTA.
Feed ItemDelivering Practical Regional Biodiversity Information Systems (BioInformatics) in the Albertine Rift
Feed ItemThe NIGLAS Hosted a Training Workshop on Water Quality Monitoring and Lake Basin Ecosystem Management
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Feed ItemUNECE Water Convention could offer solutions to African countries for shared water resource management
UNECE Water Convention could offer solutions to African countries for shared water r